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why does my cats hair get so matted?

my cat has long hair and it keeps getting very matted and like knots even after its brushed. I am unable to take her to the vet at this time. I have cut the knots out but she becomes matted again.


Asked by Member 967528 on Feb 23rd 2010 in Home Grooming
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Izadore (Izzie)

You don't need to take your cat to the vet's for a matting problem. I have a long-haired cat who I had to have shaved last summer she got matted so badly. The groomer told me that long-haired cats need twice the brushing that a short haired cat needs. You need to get behind the ears, under the legs and tail, the chest, etc. I use a steel comb on Delilah, and at this time of the year, I spray her brush with human hair conditioner watered down a little and comb it through her fur. Be careful when you cut so you don't get her skin. Been there, done that, felt AWFUL!!!


Izadore (Izzie) answered on 2/23/10. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


Stella

If your cat is matted at this time Id go to a groomer as you may just need to get her shaved and start over. Brushes like slickers are great for shedding but it only gets the top of the fur not right down to the bottom which is where the mats start to form. You need a medium tooth comb (you can get this at any pet store really.www.deboergroomingsupplies.com Something like that. It will get right to the bottom and prevent any mats. Long hair cats need to be combed everyday to stay on top of it. As a groomer I have read persians should be combed twice!!! If you hit a snag or a bit of a matt this is what I use and love www.aristopet.com.au Its sharp but you slowly just use it to comb through the middle of the matt and slowly get it out this way. Then comb over that section to make sure. NEVER use scissors to cut out matts it is very dangerous no matter how careful you are.


Stella answered on 2/23/10. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


Charlie

The other posters had some great advice. I just also wanted to reiterate that you must be very careful when cutting out matted fur with scissors. Its very easy to cut your cats skin and then you are stuck with taking her to the vet for stitches. I would just work on breaking up with matts with a brush or take her to a professional groomer to have her hair clipped.


Charlie answered on 2/23/10. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


Elise

Thanks, Stella, for the information on the Mat Breaker! I have a bunch of Maine Coons (purebred, with relatively short fur that meets the breed standard for "silky but shaggy"). No one has had any matting problems until Elise. You can find recent posts about how I managed to nick her skin with scissors when I tried to remove petrified Klingons and matted fur. I swear I was just aiming at the upper part of the mats, but I somehow ended up cutting her in three places, which required an emergency vet visit and stitches. For some reason, her fur quality is different from that of my other MCs, who are all related in some way. I figured out that this is one cat who needs a regular comb out in her hind area. Longhair breeders and cat show exhibitors swear by their metal combs--they penetrate deeper into the fur than brushes do. Also, the occasional bath can help get rid of loose and dead fur. Harvey hasn't been bathed since last April, and today upchucked a big hairball. Good luck!


Elise answered on 2/23/10. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer