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Ragdoll or Snowshoe?

I have a rescue cat. She looks like a ragdoll or maybe even a snowshoe. How can i tell the difference? When we first got her she was mostly white with a few markings. Now her back is a dark brown/black color. Are there easy differences between the two breeds which will help me tell.


Asked by Member 780852 on Dec 17th 2008 Tagged snowhoe, ragdolls in Snowshoe
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Atrus

If you have a rescue cat, you have a domestic medium hair. Without a pedigree and/or registration, it is impossible to tell a ragdoll or snowshow from a randomly-bred moggie. Both are new breeds and it is not uncommon for moggies to look very much like them. All pointed cats are born light colored and develop their points as they age. Moggies can be pointed without any purebreds in their recent ancestry. Congrats on getting what is probably a very pretty cat without having to pay $800+, but it is incredibly unlikely there is any ragdoll or snowshoe in her.


Atrus answered on 12/17/08. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


Squeaky

A picture of this will help very very much. You should join Catster and ask again. its fun and its free!

It's EXTREMELY rare to find a purebred cat at a shelter. especially relatively new breeds. It does happen though. there was a beautiful purebred flame point siamese at my shelter the owners gave up cause he was too talkative.

anyway, chances are your kitty is a domestic long hair (which i assume because you think it could be a ragdoll which has long hair) with darks points and white feet. many "moggie" cats can look like other pure bred cats through lots of mixed up geneology, but unless the cat has papers and pure bred parents. it's not really a "breed"

Maybe you can ask the rescue if they know anything about how the cat got there. a breeder would never allow their cat to randomly breed with any cat and have wild kittens roaming around.


Squeaky answered on 12/17/08. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer