Rainey

Has your cat needed a gingivectomy (removal of gums)?

My 1 year old male cat has "overgrown gums" and needs a gingivectomy (removal of gums). This is a surgery that requires anesthesia and several hundred dollars.
Has this procedure been done on your cat?
Does a gingivectomy prevent tooth loss?
Will the gums overgrow again?
Even with the gingivectomy will I need to brush his teeth?
Does a water additive help in removing plaque and tarter? If so what product have you used?

Thanks everyone. I really don't wan to put my cat though this procedure unless it's absolutely necessary to keep him healthy.


Asked by Rainey on Apr 13th 2010 Tagged teeth, gums, surgery in Dental Care
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Linus (Dreamboat #72a)

Well, we are not vets here - only people who love cats. These questions should really be asked of your vet. If your vet is not willing to take the time to answer your questions and explain things to you, then find a new vet. You can always get a second opinion at another vet if you want. Dental health is very important as dental/oral problems can affect his overall health.

Tooth brushing is always recommended... but not every cat will tolerate it. Use only toothbrushes and toothpaste made for cats. After any oral surgery, it may be best to wait a few days for the mouth to heal before you brush - discuss that with your vet.


Linus (Dreamboat #72a) answered on 4/13/10. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


Harvey

Harvey had his gums shaved a few milimeters when he was around 10 months old. He had a red line at the base of his gums, and it was feared that he had the dread Lymphocytic Plasmacytic Gingivitis Stomatitis (LPGS). I had to see 8 vets (I kept on getting different diagnoses from different doctors), and the last vet, an animal dentist, said it probably wasn't LPGS, and that he should have a gingivectomy. It involved anesthesia, yes, and wasn't cheap, but now, three years later, although he still has a faint red line on his gums, the dentist says he's in good shape. She still doesn't know what he had/has. I use Biotene Veterinary Maintenance Gel. I'm supposed to "brush" his teeth daily with a Q-tip. The purpose of a gingivectomy is to prevent bacteria from collecting under the overgrown gums, thus preventing cavities and tooth loss. The gums will not grow back, as far as I know. If your vet thinks it's necessary, I'd recommend that you do it, but try to find a pet dentist.


Harvey answered on 4/14/10. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 1 Report this answer