Marlee

Deaf cat meows all NIGHT! HELP!!!!

I adopted another cat 1 week ago. She is 3 years old, pure white, spayed, declawed and she is Deaf. She is beautiful. At the beginning she was hissing with Marlee and cat fighting but Marlee does not even mind. At night is when she meows really really loud. I know a deaf cat meows louder than a normal cat but is there anything that I can do to curb this....sleep is taking a beating on me and my boyfriend. She does sleep all day and by 10 or 11 at night she is raring to go. This morning I was up at 3:45am with her and decided to feed both at 4am. After that she took her usual place on the computer chair and since then has slept. I don't know if her squalling at night means she is hungry or what. Any ideas or suggestions would be awesome. Thanks a bunch.


Asked by Marlee on Jul 13th 2009 Tagged behaviour, noisiness in Noisiness
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Izadore (Izzie)

If you haven't yet had this kitty to the vet, then you need to go. Have her checked out to make sure she's healthy, and then go from there. She is spayed, right? A week is not a terribly long time for a cat to adjust to new surroundings, especially if she's been tossed around from home to home in her life. She has one less sense to rely on, and although she has more than likely accommodated herself to being deaf, she probably is frightened and at a loss. Cats are nocturnal and if she sleeps all day, when you're home, she wants playtime and loving-on. Make sure you're not too busy to spend an hour or so focused on just her to make her feel comfortable with you, Marlee and her new surroundings. She's probably not hungry, just lonely. Can she sleep with you?
Good luck and please keep us updated on how your new baby is doing. Purrs!


Izadore (Izzie) answered on Jul 13th.

Other Answers


Answers

Guest

I have a feral cat colony I manage which has a white (deaf) cat. She is spayed, but will start crying when night time approaches. She has two littermates, one of whom is particularly sensitive to her cries. Fortunately, her sister comes running when she starts her crying. I don't think it is unusual behavior, but you might want to try playing with her and wearing her out before you go to bed. You also might want to try feeding her a bedtime snack, or leaving her special little treats on her usual computer chair. Make sure she has plenty of toys to keep her occupied. You could also try giving her some catnip late at night. These are just some suggestions, and hopefully something will work to help you catch some zzzs. Best of luck.


Member 185886 answered on 7/13/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 4 Report this answer


Minuit AKA Miss Meany

Get yourself some ear plugs and ignore her. Cats are smart, she knows meowing will get you up and get her some attention and food. I always free feed Miss Meany, so possibly doing so yourself will ensure it isn't a hunger issue with your little girl or give her a bit of food before you go off to bed.
Instead of allowing her to sleep all day, wake her up and get her playing throughout the day, especially before going to bed.
Have a good one.


Minuit AKA Miss Meany answered on 7/13/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 4 Report this answer


Lola

My cat show club includes breeders of white Turkish Angoras, Maine Coons, and Norwegian Forest Cats, and the deaf ones can get very vocal. The other posters have given you good advice. I am just telling you that you are not alone.


Lola answered on 7/13/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 1 Report this answer


Cooper

My cat is not deaf, but he is definitely a talker. When we first got him from the SPCA, he would often stand outside our bedroom door meowing late at night or very early in the morning. Finally, I asked the SPCA for guidance. They offered several suggestions, but here is the one that worked:
Another option is to create a nice, comfy space for him to be confined in at
night - with a litterbox, toys, bedding or kitty condo. You can try leaving on a
radio and see if that has a calming effect on him (especially if you think he
might meow a lot). With some kitties, being confined at night teaches them that nighttime is quiet-time, and eventually they can be re-integrated into the house at night.

For the record, my kitty has not been able to be reintegrated, but he does just fine (no meowing) in his own bedroom at night and is perfectly happy to see me in the morning! Good luck with your new kitty.


Cooper answered on 7/14/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 2 Report this answer


Ridley

Other posters who know Deaf cats have given you some good advice, but I just wanted you to know that it might also be a new-kitty thing, since you have only lived with your new little girl one week. When I was new to my forever home two years ago, I was up all night and had a lot to say. I wanted Mom to wake up and be with me. An early breakfast was nice, too, but I think I just felt lonely in a strange place and wanted to be with an awake person. I hate to tell you how long it took me to get over it -- a couple of months at least -- but now I sleep most of the night.


Ridley answered on 7/14/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 3 Report this answer


Guest

It's an attention getting device. Mine has started this recently. I now make sure there is food in the bowl when I go to bed. It seems to do the trick. When it's just attention, I whistle like for a dog and she comes running to the bed. I give her some petting, and when she's purring really good, we're both back asleep. Probaby a combo of food and attention with food also being attention Good luck!


Member 256691 answered on 7/14/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 4 Report this answer


Sam

We do not have a deaf cat, but four cats and had many more over the years.

In the beginning we had cats meowing early in the morning at our always closed bedrooom doors, waking us up.

The way we resolved that was in several ways:

1. We weaned the cats to a different eating pattern/time, being two times a day, one time at 8 am and one time at 5 pm, and leaving always dry food out in a bowl.

2. We bought a 'noise machine' for our bedroom. It is quite soothing for sleeping, filtering away any sound (can be combined with ear plugs) and it muffles our own sounds, so the cats cannot hear those.

3. We usually put away any cat toys that a cat may consider prey to be delivered at our door, because some of the cats would pick that up and make a racket in front of our door, delivering it to us.

Result: cats only come every morning to meow at our door at normal wake up time, just before their own breakfast time or if they hear our alarm clock. No more early wake ups.


Sam answered on 7/14/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 3 Report this answer


Oscar

We found that putting night lights around the house helped our older deaf cat feel more secure. Did cut down on some of the crying!


Oscar answered on 7/14/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 3 Report this answer


Legolas

When I first adopted my deaf white cat, Legolas, he would walk around the house crying at the top of his lungs every morning from about 4:00 in the morning until about 6:30. After about 6 months of this, the crying decreased significantly. I have had him five years, and now he will sometimes let one or two cries around 6:00 in the morning, but he hasn't done the continuous 2 hours of crying in over 4 years. The crying may decrease once the cat has had time to settle into her new home (and we all know cats can take months to settle). Until then, tire her out with play before bed, and feed a small meal if you think she is crying due to hunger. Don't get up and give attention when she cries or she will learn that crying makes you come running. Pull a pillow over your head and try to ignore her. Good luck!


Legolas answered on 7/14/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 3 Report this answer


Boo Zelda

I agree that it's typical cat behavior, not just for deaf cats. My cat meows at night for attention, too. I ignore her and she eventually shuts up.

If, before I go to bed, I play with her until she's had enough and leaves the room, she is much less likely to meow. She lets me know she wants to play around 11pm by rolling around on the living room floor and looking all cute and meowing at me. I think she meows after I go to bed if I don't play with her to say, "Hey! I told you I wanted to play, ya meanie! How hard is it to dangle a fuzzy ball over me while I bat at it for a few minutes?!"


Boo Zelda answered on 7/14/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 2 Report this answer


Mr. Wolffieman

I am thinking she is trying to adapt to her new surroundings and at night is when she is finding it the hardest. With the days activity ending she maybe feels lonely and acts out because she is not distracted with day time activity...... when I bring a new cat home it takes about a month before they are 100% OK......I wish her the best.....hang in there....Time is a great healer...The Ragdoll Clan


Mr. Wolffieman answered on 7/14/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 3 Report this answer


Miskena

I have a blue Burmese cat who wails...loudly...when she is playing with her toys. She will carry them in her mouth and cry at the same time. I give her very positive attention which has cut down her wailing. She also brings me her toy now and I reward her with love and a snack. I take her toy then and hide it under the blankets and she will sleep with us until morning. She is now teaching Kitty Grumbles (who cried for her kittens for 3 weeks when I first got her).


Miskena answered on 7/14/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 2 Report this answer


Maryam

It looks like you have a plethora of good suggestions from other posters. Mine would echo theirs: play with her shortly before going to bed, and entice her to sleep with you, showing her plenty of loving attention. Pretty soon she will undoubtedly settle in, knowing that she is finally safe and loved for LIFE.


Maryam answered on 7/14/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 2 Report this answer


Petruska (Rainbow Bridge 2002)

Hi there,

I am wondering if your new kitty is looking for you at night. When I was with my Purrents they would go to bed and suddenly the whole house was dark! I would use my voice to try and find them. They would call to me and I'd hear them and come running.

Since your new kitty is deaf maybe you could work with her on instead of sounds, vibrations. Maybe you could make some noise or walk on the floor so she can feel the vibrations and follow you into your bedroom. Perhaps you could "prepare" her that you're going to bed - turn off the lights, take her in the bedroom with you, put her on your bed, etc. This also helped me know where my Purrents went at night.

Soon your kitty will get into a regular routine and will know when you are going to bed. Perhaps you could play with her some before you go to sleep so she gets tired too. A bed in your room might also help.

Good luck with your new kitty. I am sure she will be very happy!


Petruska (Rainbow Bridge 2002) answered on 7/14/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 1 Report this answer


Gysmo, (Always in my heart)

When Mylo and Felica were getting older they both meowed loudly at night. Not the same meow as in the day. It was almost like they were in pain, or confused. Our Vet said to leave on the radio and a light, which worked ( I know your kitty is deaf, so the radio may not help). Also putting her in a separate room with food, water and her box is another suggestion he made, as did others here. If all fails..earplugs work great!


Gysmo, (Always in my heart) answered on 7/14/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 1 Report this answer


Dallas

It turned out that a friend of mine had her kitties crate trained. They had all their comfies in the crate and spend the entire night in the crate. Blankets, toys, food, water, etc was all in there. I would wonder also that the deaf cat is wondering what she is feeling with her paws. She might not be able to hear but at night I would bet that things physically feel different since the sounds of the day are no longer creating any vibrations that she would feel other times. Some how confining her as was described in other answers might be very helpful and help her to feel so secure that her wailing won't stop. Also, some kitties have saved some lives by wailing when there's something very wrong. A fire or other something going on. Cats can be sensitive to that sort of thing and really need to be heard. Of course, some kitties wonder if we speak "meow-cat-ese". Of course not.


Dallas answered on 7/14/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


Miney Moe

My cat is a 'night meower" too. Feeding him right before bed didn't help because he scarfed everything down in like 5 mins - so by 3am he was hungry again! And try not to give in and go out when you hear "the call" (no matter how pitiful the meow sounds!) They learn that MEOW=person coming out and they NEVER stop!!
You could try meowing back - (it throws them off for a bit!) but they catch on to that trick pretty quickly. :)

Here are my two suggestions:
1. Try putting out a night light
2. Buy one of those "timed" feeders and set it to pop open at 3am! Kitty gets fed, you're still asleep, and everyone's happy.

Good luck!


Miney Moe answered on 7/14/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


Guest

First, you're obviously wonderful and caring people to take such a lovely kitty into your home. It has only been one-week since she arrived, so it's still extremely early in the game. I would think it probably is a security issue. Perhaps she feels worried about being abandoned, depending on ther previous circumstances. Do you let her sleep with you, or do you close the door? If it is closed, perhaps leave it open so she can have the opportunity to come cuddle. Also, does she have these fits only in the middle of the night, or during the day, too? If it is at other times, maybe take her to the vet just to ensure she isn't in any pain. Try playing with her more in the early evening to tucker her out so that she won't be as raring to go at 11 p.m. Sometimes, though, it's just a cat's nature, although I really do think it will eventually calm down. My two 13-year-old cats still get me up early around 5 a.m. for food. And, like a silly fool, I get up!!!


Member 224645 answered on 7/14/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


Frankie a.k.a. Binkie

My cat used to do this when I shut the bedroom door and kept him out at night. It was miserable from 3-6 a.m. Ignoring him didn't help me go to sleep. I now keep the door open and let him come and go as he pleases. He occasionally wakes me with a light nudge or cuddle but that's minimal. He just wanted to be able to sleep near me. I also bought a food timer that feeds him at 6 am so I don't have to get up and do it. A personal fan or white noise machine by your bedside will help mask any stray meows. After a month or so the new cat may become friendlier with Marlee, and may prefer his night-time companionship over yours. Good luck!


Frankie a.k.a. Binkie answered on 7/14/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


Rocky

My Ragdoll Rocky started meowing in the middle of the night about 3 years ago. We've tried everything to get him to stop! Ignoring him doesn't work. He wakes us up with his howling anywhere from 3am to 5am because he wants food. It doesn't matter that there's food down, he wants fresh food! We've finally been able to stop his meowing by feeding him his dinner later at night (right before we go to bed). So, try feeding your cat as late as possible and maybe that will help! Good luck!


Rocky answered on 7/14/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


Bob

Try not to feed them that early in the morning. By feeding her at 4am, you are reinforcing the fact that meowing is going to get good results, even that early. My cat Bob (pictured) is also an early riser. I've trained myself to ignore him until I'm ready to get up and now he stops the meowing early. There is also the option of putting them on the other side of the bedroom door, but they hate it and sometimes it makes them even louder.


Bob answered on 7/14/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


Guest

Feed her right before you go to bed and let her sleep on your bed. My boys sleep in fleece beds at the foot of the bed. Luckily, I am short. If they are not allowed in they carry on until, I let them in.


Member 814302 answered on 7/14/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


Seven of Nine

If your cat is home alone all day, then she is likely sleeping all day. Just before I go to bed, I have some intense play time with Dad that wears me down (about an hour does the trick). I sleep through the night.


Seven of Nine answered on 7/14/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


Autumn Rainbow Germiquet

Hi I would suggest ignoring it. Don't give her attn when she cries or she will continue to do it. I have a Calico Autumn (using her profile here) Who does the exact same thing she is quiet all day and at night starts up with the incessant meowing. It used to be really bad but I decided one night to start ignoring her and let her cry. Now she'll cry for a bit and realize she isn't going to get what she wants which is the attn and just end up sleeping either a) on my pillow above my head or b) at my feet and at times will just run around the house and play by herself. IF your little girl is used to being fed at night then she will do this until she gets used to being fed at the time you've started feeding her at also. Don't give into the meowing you are just praising the behaviour and she starts to see she can get away with it. God bless and good luck
Tara


Autumn Rainbow Germiquet answered on 7/14/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


Rose

Depending on how long since she's been away from her old home, she could be missing it or just be confused. If this is the case, she will soon enough realize she is in a good place, and that it's home!



Rose answered on 7/14/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


Saki

Hey Marlee! I've seen some good suggestions. It is true for deaf cats to meow a lot. If it's possible, try seeing if she will play during the day. Maybe wearing her out of energy, she might sleep more at night.

Be sure she is doing her routines normally. Saki wouldn't stop meowing once and she turned out to be sick. It could be that she is hungry, but because she is new, she will have to get use to your feeding schedule.

My cat Leo cries sometimes and I'll call for him and he comes running to me. She probbly wants to play or have attention or just know where you guys are. Being new can sometimes be scary for a kitty.

Don't forget to look over everyone else's suggestions. Keep trying to calm her down and hope things pull through for you! Good luck!


Saki answered on 7/14/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


Tigger

You may want to try a Feilway diffuser to calm her down or Bach Remedy. Can she be played with before you both go to bed. Maybe she needs some run time to wear her out.


Tigger answered on 7/14/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


Izzie

The main reasons I meow:

-Attention
-Wanting to play (literrally picking up the toy and tossing it across the room)
-Looking for my 'sister'

If you are home during the day, try playing with her throughout the day so she's tired at night time.

It could be because shes hungry, so you should change her feeding schedule and maybe make sure there is some hard food out all the time.


Izzie answered on 7/14/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


Guest

Hi.

Well for me there are two things I would change if my cats did that. First of all, by feeding her when she meows, you're actually reforcing her behaviour, that way she knows everytime she meows you'll give her food.
Personally, i always keep food out for my cats during the night. They sleep with me, so I notice that they'll always get up to get some food and water and then go back to sleep.

Though cats tend to be more active during the night, i try to ware them out a bit during the day make them understand that it's sleep time when I sleep, so they'll sleep with me,which they do.


Member 761153 answered on 7/14/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


Summer

I had a very old cat that started yelling at night. It was my first warning that he was going deaf. I really think it was because he would wake up and not know where I was. I admit I was a softy, and would turn on my bedroom light, get up and bring him to bed. After awhile all I had to do was turn on the light and he'd come running to me. Then he settled down for the rest of the night.


Summer answered on 7/14/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 1 Report this answer


Tyson

Our litle girl Faithe is the same ..pure white and deaf . She did meow in the night but mum soon learnt that she was looking for someone so had a stick by the bed that when she cried she banged it on the floor and she would come running and get on the bed and go to sleep .. Now she is good and only cries like that when she cant find her or us other cats . And we go running so no problems . Mum "calls" her by banging on the floor so now she knows where we are .


Tyson answered on 7/14/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


Tam

I have a deaf Maine Coon kitty that we rescued. He was/is VERY vocal at night. I have found that feeding Tam just PRIOR to going to bed and having a "play session" will keep him quiet MOST of the night. Rebel is the other kitty in the family, who is older and LOVES to sleep, so he does not come running when Tam starts crying. I have also found, as most of you have said, that it is just a matter of being lonesome. Tam does not like closed doors and if the bedroom door is closed at night, that will make him cry more. I also think prior to our rescuing him, he was kept "closed up," which would accentuate the problem. But, with the "play session," he will be quiet a GREAT percentage of the night. I thought it was just "our kitty," so it is nice to know that other deaf cats suffer the same problem.
I am glad to see this kind of feedback. I think it will help us in understanding the problem.


Tam answered on 7/14/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 1 Report this answer


Guest

I have a cat (Duchess) who is blind and often wakes from a deep sleep with frantic meows. All I have to do is say her name or otherwise let her hear my voice and she's okay. I'm guessing she's disoriented and scared. Your cat probably has the same thing but since she cannot rely on her hearing, you will need to comfort and reassure her with sight or touch. Maybe if she slept in your room and could see you if she woke in the night? Or if she was on your bed and could feel your presence? Perhaps if you took a piece of your clothing, etc that had your scent on it and left it where she sleeps this would help too. I would also advise playing with her and feeding her before you go to bed, that way she's eating and then has a full belly. Good luck!


Member 323519 answered on 7/14/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


Lucifer James Gibbs

Oh how sweet Marlee !
Don't know if I can help but, here's what my solution is for both my boys.
First of all Luci loves the sound of his own voice, okay ? Merlyn couldn't be bothered unless there's major human food available.
So, I too was getting up every morning at 2:00 am to get them their breakfast. Until I noticed out our back patio (they have their own door to our front patio), our huge tree loaded with squirrels, so I started leaving nuts & a water bowl with the screen always closed.
My boys are addicted to simply & quietly, QUIETLY Marlee, sitting perfectly still, watching all the action, anywhere from 6-8 hours per day. I also leave crust crumbs which attracts small birds to entertain them too !
Resulting......in them sleeping nearly as long as I do ! (around 6-7 hrs)
Don't know if you've got a patio or not, or big tree's either, but its worked & works daily in our house.
Good luck kiddo & God Bless !
luv sheila j.g.


Lucifer James Gibbs answered on 7/14/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


Guest

I don't know if I would do this with a deaf cat, since they may not realize they are meowing or how loud it is.. but when my cat gets to bugging me in the middle of the night... I break out the squirt bottle.


Member 614873 answered on 7/14/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


Guest

My guess is that your new kitty's behavior mostly has to do with being in the adjustment phase, as other posters have pointed out. Here's what I was advised to do when my new kitty was howling during the night: go to the cat and reassure her. Of course I wasn't thrilled about getting up in the middle of the night, but after a few weeks, my new kitty no longer awoke us. I would go pick her up and bring her to a big kitty bed or onto the guest bed and spend time patting her until she went to sleep. This probably took no longer than 45 minutes. It was a wonderful way for us to bond as well. My opinion is that you should NOT ignore your cat's meows; she needs to know that she's secure in her new environment, and when she feels that way, I'll bet the nocturnal interruptions will stop. And definitely put away her toys before your bedtime, as another poster advised. Best of luck!


Member 812153 answered on 7/14/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 1 Report this answer


Marshall

Both of my kitties do that, it drives me nuts, BUT i very quickly learned that once night hit and i hoped in bed it would start...i've tried food, or playing or checking cat box or maybe something i missed then i realized ihave to intereact with them in order to check this stuff...they're lonely i just call for them they hop up in bed with i give them some love till i doze off and they are content. So maybe your kitty just wants some love, bring kitty into the bed with you (if your okay with that)


Marshall answered on 7/14/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


Courtney and Sammi and Presouz

I have had many cats over my 53 years this happened with 2 cats over the years, I will tell you my story for them. One was my old man, he was going blind and getting old and was confused and would cry cuz he couldnt find his way at night, once I left lights on for him it seemed to get better, maybe she is hard of seeing too? Maybe leave on lights for her at night, like night lights all over. My other cat would cry to get me up so I can give her a treat or if she wanted something they are very smart and some are smarter than others. I had to stop giving out treats to her or she would bug me day and night for them once I started leaving out canned for before I went to bed and stopped the temtation treats she got better.. I hope this helps.. or try waking her up during the day to get her clock with yours..


Courtney and Sammi and Presouz answered on 7/14/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 1 Report this answer


Guest

Adjustment is a big thing with some cats and that can sometimes take up to a month. She may be feeling some stress in her new surroundings and to another cat. Perhaps try putting your kitty in the carrier with only her own scent on the towel on whatever you put in there for her to sleep on. There is also a spray called "feelaway" that can be calming to most kitties. I am not sure of the spelling, but it is a fairly commont product and often used with great success. Keeping her awake for lengths of time during your awake hours will help alot and will also help her to adjust to you. Food about an hour before bedtime will help as well. She will probably groom after she eats and may even want to play for a while before setting down for the ight. Good luck with your new gorgeous kitty.


Member 425783 answered on 7/14/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


STINKY-PIE

HI THERE.....I HAD TWO CAT-COUSINS THAT DID THIS.... THE FIRST ONE WAS 9YRS.OLD AND I WOULD GET UP AND TURN THE LIGHTS ON AND SHE WOULD STOP, WE FOUND OUT LATER THAT IT WAS THE DARKNESS THAT MADE HER CRY, HER EYE SIGHT WAS NOT AS GOOD AS IN EARLIER YRS. SO WHEN ALL THE LIGHTS WERE OFF SHE COULDNT SEE AND IT SCARED HER I GUESS. THE SECOND CAT WAS HUNGRY....WE WOULD FILL HER BOWL UP, SHE WOULD EAT AND THEN GO ABOUT HER BUISNESS. IN BOTH CASES THEY STOPPED THE CRYING(MEOWING) AFTER I DID THOSE THINGS. SO TRY LEAVING A NIGHT LIGHT ON OR FILLING HER FOOD BOWL UP RIGHT BEFORE YOU RETIRE FOR THE NITE. I HOPE I HELPED...GOOD LUCK.
STINKY-PIE >"<


STINKY-PIE answered on 7/14/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 2 Report this answer


Beau

I adopted a pure white, deaf cat named Beau and he does the same thing. He gives operas about 3am every night if I don't keep him awake during the day. Give him toys to play with or other mind stimulating things to do during the day to keep him up (or go over and pet him here and there). I use a faceted crystal suncatcher in my window. Beau loves to chase light and shadows and he spends hours wearing himself out chasing the rainbows when sunbeams hit the prism.


Beau answered on 7/14/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 1 Report this answer


Crybaby

Just an idea, but you could try to get her on a schedual. To do this you will need someone home all day. Keep her from napping, sounds simple enough but it is harder than it sounds. Keep her active and playing most of the day and when you see her getting ready to nap, pull out the treats and play a game of find it. To play this just get very fragrant treats and let her have 1 or 2 and then show her that you are going to hide them or put one in an empty wash basket that has holes big enough for her to easily get her paws in. Hopefully if you keep her busy all day she will sleep through the night. Good luck!!


Crybaby answered on 7/14/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


Brian

My Dad appeals to my natural instincts. We're night creatures and we like to hunt. Dad plays with us before bedtime with a toy that appeals to our hunting instincts (small fishing pole with mouse attached, etc) and eventually we capture it (hunting instinct solved) and we all get rewarded with a tasty (but healthy) snack treat (we ate our prey solved). Lights out, bedtime. Took about three weeks or so for us to get into the routine but it works for us.


Brian answered on 7/14/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 1 Report this answer


Guest

Hi there. What you should try to do is to keep the cat as active through the day as you can. Play with her if she's so inclined, when she goes to sleep wake her up. She's got her internal clock screwed up. By no means cater or give in to her by getting up & feeding her at an hour that is not convenient for YOU, otherwise the behavior is being reinforced. If you can lock her out of the bedroom & close the door, do so. If necessary, have her sleep in a different room completely. You can discourage the behavior by keeping a squirt bottle or gun near you as well, & when she does it in the middle of the night, squirt her. It will shock her enough to shut her up, then you can go back to sleep.

Deaf cats can be tough to live with. Shooter is 11 now, & he came to us when his owner, a dear friend of ours, passed away going on 3 years ago now. I can relate.


Member 307306 answered on 7/14/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


MoMo Anguiano Smith, RIP Jan 1

My daughter has a deaf dog. When it is dark she looses the sight sense and that scares her. We make sure that there is light in the house and cuddle a lot with her when she's awake. I think your cat hasn't gotten used to her new surroundings and will eventually calm down. Spend time with her and eventually she will gain self confidence in her new home. Don't give up on her. Lots of luck


MoMo Anguiano Smith, RIP Jan 1 answered on 7/14/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 1 Report this answer


Screech

So I have a few questions myself. Is anyone home with her during the daytime? How many times a day and when do you feed her? Do you let her sleep in the bedroom with you? It could be caused from a lot of different things. You might have to make a few changes in your daily routine, but not anything drastic. I had a deaf cat when I was younger. He was also white. He was a great cat. There were a few things we had to change for him and get him used to.

I look forward to hearing from you.

Megan!


Screech answered on 7/14/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


Lahna

Feeding before bed time is a good plan, BUT, try playing with her before you want to go to sleep. Wear her out. Get her interactive toys that she can play with while you sleep. Some cats sleep through the night, but since they are nocturnal, many are awake.

Cat's need exercise and they need attention. The more you can give her during waking hours, the better chance she will sleep and so can you.


Lahna answered on 7/14/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


Guest

Ask deaf humans for ideas. They'll know first hand what upsets a creature in a new environment with a new owner who doesn't read sign language!
Spend lots of time honing communication, noticing things that vibrate, flash, and aren't constant. Your kitty needs to know how to predict what will happen without sound cues.
You could try turning off all the sounds/volume that you can, than feel and see what your cat feels and sees. Do you give a signal for meal times? Startle her because she doesn't see you coming? There are things hearing people just don't have a clue about unless they live without sound signals. Try it!


Member 745834 answered on 7/14/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


Frasier

I have had a deaf cat for 5 years now. He screams pretty much every night around 4 or 4:30 in the am. I just get up and make sure he sees me and most of the time he will run up the stairs and then lay down with me and my hubby. For the most part I think he just gets lonely and is not sure if we are home or not.

Hope that helps, I have a feeling it might be normal and since she is new to your house she might be checking to make sure you are there and she is not alone.

Hope that helps you


Frasier answered on 7/14/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


Eartha Kitty

Just as with children, you must keep her awake and busy throughout the day. Spend a few days getting her used to her new sleep schedule by investing time playing lots of games, and just keeping her at the center of attention. Do what ever it takes to keep her from getting in a cat nap.

Then, as others have posted, give her the highest protein meal before bedtime (followed by a few tarter control treats to clean her teeth). Try a cat food that is primarily turkey for that evening meal...the tryptophan should help make her sleepy. Then have some quiet bedtime cuddles in your own sleeping room, and she may settle right down.


Eartha Kitty answered on 7/14/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


Petey

Well, our cat, Boo, is about a year and we just got her spayed actually only about a week ago, and so when u said meowing through the night i thought of her because she would do that before, but now ive only spent one night there and she was quiet because she was hiding about all day because she was in pain and still had stitches, but maybe your cat is in pain...do u know if anything happened to her before she started this? Also, my grandparents have a 16 year old and she is deaf but she meows when you pet her and/or she wants attention, maybe your cat is really needy, i know my sister's cat, Rebel, is.


Petey answered on 7/14/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


Guest

When I first got my kittens many years ago I was told they needed to get on a schedule a lot like children and the best thing to do was to play with them thru out the day so they could not nap and that way by the time it was time for everyone to go to sleep they would too. And all would sleep thru the night. it worked and it's worked on the older cats I have since adopted....good luck Sydney, Sami and Sebastian


Member 603498 answered on 7/14/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


Frankie

I can relate. I adopted Frankie from the shelter in Oct. 06 - he was around a year old then and has been deaf since birth. The first couple weeks I had him home, all he did was HOWL (especially at night) and swat at me. I'm sure I cried more than he did, out of frustration and lack of sleep! I just didn't know what to do for him and thought I'd made a horrible mistake. Long story short, it took a month or so, but Frankie did start mellowing out and quieting down. My only real advice is PATIENCE & LOVE. I also give him just enough food before I go to bed to tide him over till morning. I think a deaf cat takes quite a bit longer to adapt and feel safe in his/her new surroundings. Frankie's still a loud talker, but not constantly. I'm starting to understand his various "speeches". Mostly he's just bored, hungry or wants a little attention. Nowadays he's a big old lover boy, funny & a little too smart sometimes. Love him like crazy... Hang in there - it does get better!!


Frankie answered on 7/14/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 1 Report this answer


Guest

I'm not a cat expert by any means but my last cat would meow in my face and smack me in the face with his paw or continuously bang the cabinet door where his food was kept until I got up and fed him. This cat I just adopted doesn't do anything like that but I'm in the habit now of putting food out before I go to bed so I would suggest you try that and see if works. She might be used to eating at night.


Member 574347 answered on 7/14/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


Captain

When my kitten was new, he slept (or rather, stayed up all night meowing) in a room separate from my other cat. Turned out, he needed a night light! Sounds silly but it cut his crying drastically. He's still prone to crying at night when he's bored and wants to play, so I've just had to move him and his sisfur to their own bedroom at night. I lock them in a large room with thier litterbox and food and water. He can cry all he wants and I can't hear him.


Captain answered on 7/14/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


Guest

Always leave a bowl of dry chow available for her to munch on when ever she may have a hunger pain. My calico does this crying at night, I just grab her, cuddle her in my arms and put her on my chest and she'll settle down and go to sleep. Then her only problem is ahe starts purring and when she purrs her nose runs and she sneezes all over me. Try and see if this helps, good luck.


Member 531413 answered on 7/14/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


Toby

My sister has had a couple of deaf cats, and they do meow alot at night, because the house is silent, and they are looking for someone. they are very special cats, I have one at my house that has been here for a month, someone dumped him here, but my cat in the house wont let him in. I'm hoping to find him a home, because I'm afraid he will go in the street and wont hear the cars


Toby answered on 7/14/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


Guest

My cat is 14 or 15 years old. He has always lived with 2 other cats, but is somewhat of a loner as he has been diagnosed with feline AIDS, has had his eye removed and has become deaf within the last 7 yrs. His vocalizations increased when he became deaf. Three years ago I had serious dental problems and had to take meds at 12:30 and 3:30 AM. Bogey would get up with me to keep me company. He still wakes me at those times every night by pawing my face or pulling my hair. It DOES disrupt my sleep, but I think how grateful I am to still have him around to do that! I found if I get up and give him some attention and food and treats the first time he might go back to sleep the second time if I pet him for a minute. I think your cat may be lonely or frightened since she is new to her surroundings. Try some TLC until she feels more comfortable or bring her in bed with you to cuddle. Or give her a cat bed, which worked with our other two! Good luck!


Member 641834 answered on 7/14/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 1 Report this answer


Guest

My old Joop is 17 and now deaf. Since she has FIV, has had it all her life, she has had to be sequestered from all the other cats in the house. Now that she is deaf she becomes anxious and disoriented. She needs to know where I am and then she calms down. She sleeps in a big berber ball next to my side of the bed. She can hop up anytime she wants and be next to me. Try some Feliway spray. Its a calming pheromone and works wonderfully to calm cats. Also, get the plug-in Feliway difusser which lasts for one month.I order both from Drs. Foster&Smith as it costs less from their company. You can get it at Petsmart or Petco. Petsmart is cheaper. beth jolliffe


Member 643289 answered on 7/14/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


Baci a Red *Angel*

Nothing to do with being deaf or not - I'm almost 14 yrs old and I've done this weekly forever. I live with 2 great meowsters, got cat roommates, me and abundacat love galore. It's as if I got myself an invisible friend who arrives at 3am each morning and I meows to the furiend. My humans wake up - shout "Hey stop that" .. so I do and we all go back to sleep.

The humansnever get out of bed for this middle of the night meow ... it's just what Idoes - and it's not for food as I free grazing here in the house. Not to worry it's just a cat being a cat which is why da humans love us felines and our distinct PURRsonalities! Oh by the way, I'm not deaf, I hear PURRfecly!


Baci a Red *Angel* answered on 7/14/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


Guest

Where does your new friend sleep? I was fortunate enough to be blessed with an all white/blue eyed male. He was rescued by my daughter and I loved that baby so much. He was an older cat though and has gone over the Rainbow Bridge.
You might try letting this one sleep with you or at least in the same room. Also, try gently disturbing her sleep during the day, play with her or just gently wake her and get her up and moving..little snacks could help but be careful not to over do those as she may gain weight. Noticed another answer which is good, besides disturbing her sleep during the day, try playing with her for an hour before bedtime and then a snack. She sounds insecure right now and your patience will go a long way! :0)
Good Luck!


Member 490570 answered on 7/14/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


Guest

I would take her for a checkup with the vet first. I have found that introducing any new animal into the household takes about three weeks. Because this cat is deaf, she may require extra time to become familiar with her surroundings. You have placed her in unfamiliar territory. Depending on her life before you got her, she may be feeling insecure (especially since she is deaf). Imagine yourself being uprooted from the only life you've known and not being able to hear...be patient, make sure to show her attention and be consistent with all activities--from feedings to playing, keeping location consistent as well. This helps her with feeling secure. Once she is comfortable and establishes a routine, she should be fine. Show her that night time is the time people sleep. It just like dealing with a baby sleeping through the night. Limit your contact with her--if all her needs are being met, leave her be. Whatever you do, do not play with her during the night.


Member 485076 answered on 7/14/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 1 Report this answer


Guest

Hi--
You're probably going to have problems if you feed her when she meows--you are rewarding the very behavior which you want to eliminate. Try the Animal Medical Center on East 62nd St. in Manhattan, NY. They have specialists in every area, including psychology and probably hearing for animals.
Hope you get some relief.


Member 774456 answered on 7/14/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


Taz

I didnt go through everyone else's answers but I personally think you might try some cat nip before your bed time. Tire her out and she may sleep through the night. It may take a while for her to adjust to your schedule.. a cats normal schedule is to hunt at night.. just make her worn out and she may sleep. I dont suggest feeding her in the middle of the night, she will come to expect it.
Good luck.. I had a deaf white kitten once but when I was moving, my friends kids left the door open and she got out and she hid under the truck that her husband drove away in and killed her. :( I miss her greatly. Watch your doors.


Taz answered on 7/14/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


Sloppy

my slops, tho' not deaf, can get extremely vocal when she's in a new environment. when i moved to my new place it took her more or less a week to adjust. she'll cry every night but it lessened within the week after moving. after she's familiar with every nook and cranny of the new place, she settled down considerably.


Sloppy answered on 7/14/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


Lyle

Well, my litter sister isn't deaf, but she is senile at the age of 17. She howls all night long and has done this for the last 10 or so years. She also has a LARGE collection of stuffed fur babies that she moves around the living room at night and howls twice as loud if she can't find one of them. Our momma found that she makes sure Blaze has a night light and momma has a loud fan in their room at night to make white noise so Blaze doesn't wake them up. It took our new daddy about a month to get used to Blaze howling all night. He makes sure Blaze is in a separate room after she stood in the middle of the bed and howled one night. It's not a food issue as momma "free feeds" us in a big container full of IAMS multi-cat.


Lyle answered on 7/14/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


Guest

Marlee;
My first cat, Tinkerbell, did this at night after her second litter of kittens was born premature and stillborn. She would make the most heartbreaking howling noises in the middle of the night. The vet was baffled and concluded it was pyschological. Sooo, when she would start the howling, one of us, usually me, as she was my cat, or my mom, would get up, go get her, pick her up, cuddle her and take her back to bed with us. She's spend a few minutes murmuring at us, then start purring and then settle down. It took a few weeks before it settled down enough for us to be able to get her settled in just a few minutes versus a long time. Drove my dad bonkers, but ironically, in her later years, he was the one who cuddled her the most at night. that was 20 years ago. I now have Silver, who kinda does the same thing, and cuddling and petting has taught her to settle on the bed and sleep instead of yowling. Try settling her on the bed with you and see if it helps.
Dici


Member 665682 answered on 7/14/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


Guest

The answer might be very easy. Does your kitty have a catnip toy? The ONLY time my Jazzy meows during the night is when she finds her catnip toy and brings it to me to be "praised" for her beautiful trophy. She will meow (sounds more like a howl) all the way up to the side of my bed. As soon as I pet her and tell her "thank you for showing me this beautiful find" - she STOPS meowing. And I can go back to sleep. Works every time. Put the catnip toy "away" before bed and you'll have no more MEEEEOOOWWWWWWWWING.
Good luck. Jazzy's mom.
P.S. My other kitty, Tink, has ABSOLUTELY no interest in catnip toys, so she NEVER meows during the night.


Member 514458 answered on 7/14/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


Mikey

With most cats, meowing in the middle of the night could be a sign of diabetes or high blood pressure or other illness. With a deaf cat however, this is the norm. Sorry, not the answer you want to hear I am sure but you get use to it. LOL I live with 2 deaf cats, Mikey and Daisy and usually it's about being bored. It's important for you and your cat that you spend some quality time together each day, even if it's only 10- 20 minutes, as long as it's quality time it will help. With Mikey, I brush him in the evening usually close to bed time, this helps him mellow out a bit and he loves the attention. With Daisy, I just make sure there is nothing on the floor at bedtime that she can see as a toy because once she does she will talk to it for an hour.
Also, during the day, wake her up if you are home, as often as you can, this will force a different schedule and has worked for me. My cats still meow at night sometimes but not all the time.
Good luck and she is worth it.


Mikey answered on 7/15/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 1 Report this answer


Isis

You have lots of wonderful suggestions so far from people with deaf cat experience. However I have experience with breeding cats and as such have to deal with breeding females "calling" occasionally, they too wail loudest at night and many breeders deal with this by giving a small dose of Piriton (it's an antihistamine, that's pet safe). Just 1/2 tablet will calm a girl down enough to sleep at night, without making her excessively dopey or giving any negative side-effects. However don't get up at night to her, and don't fuss her when you'd like to be sleeping or you'll be reinforcing her undesirable behaviour. Make a bedtime routine you can live with and stick to it, using Piriton occasionally for a few days at a time to get her into a better sleeping pattern. Though play with her in the evening before doing this so that she is actually tired before you ask her to sleep.

All the cats here sleep at night after a good evening of play and some bedtime cuddles!

Good luck! :)


Isis answered on 7/15/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


Dolly

Is it possible to contact the previous owner ( or have the adoption agency contact them ) and find out her feeding schedule in her previous home? She might have been fed at bedtime or they might have been early risers and fed her at 4AM. Any clue as to her previous schedule could be helpful in resolving the issues you are having with her.

I leave dry food out at all times and put down a few mouthfuls of wet food before bed. My adopted kitty seems happiest with this arrangement. If I forget the wet food I get an early morning wake-up call :)

Best wishes with your new furbaby! She sounds like a sweetie.


Dolly answered on 7/15/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


Oscar

Try keeping her up when your home,by playing with her. Then she may settle down and sleep when you do.
If this doesn't work try feeding her in the evening or leaving out some dry food .
Both of these ideas have worked for me,and Mommy and Daddy have a peaceful sleep.


Oscar answered on 7/15/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


Guest

This is pretty rare but it did happen to me so I feel I must put in my two cents. My cat Blue started howling every night and did so for about 4 or 5 months. I had taken him to the vet when he first started and my vet could find nothing wrong. All of a sudden one day he fell into my leg while we were both going downstairs in my house and later on in the day it was obvious he was losing balance. I rushed him to my vet who sent us to a a vet who specialized in neurological medicine. He thought my Blue had Vestibular Disease or a brain tumor. The only way to find out was with an MRI. Vestibular Disease is a problem with the inner ear that can be corrected and does cause howling. Unfortunately Blue had the tumor, we lost him in January. THe only good thing to come out of it is that most people never heard of Vestibular Disease including me, I try to pass my experience on. You might ask your vet to about VD or tumors, just something to think about.


Member 599523 answered on 7/15/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


TUX

I've had cats my entire life & every one of them male or female have howled at night. Cats are nocturnal & domestic or not they still have instincts! I have a house with a wall that does not connect to the arched roof between two rooms (supposed to be a "decor" shelf) but I can not put anything there because Tux likes to get up there at night & howl like he's on a fence at the moon! LoL* Remember the old cartoons!?! Well.....It's the cat thing to do?! I've had Tux since he was 8weeks old & he's 4 now. He's always meowed at night. Now....I dont even hear him! LoL*


TUX answered on 7/15/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


Guest

First of all, give her at least a month to adjust to her new surroundings. If she still cries, you may have to get up and spray her with water with a squirt bottle. I put up with one of my cats crying and waking me up in the middle of the night for over a year. (The other cat would never do such a thing.) I tried just ignoring it, but that didn't work. I finally had to get up and spray him in the face with water to train him not to do this. I did this for about a week, and he hasn't cried in the middle of the night for four years now. I was hesistant to do it, but it does not hurt your cat. Make sure you give her lots of love in the morning when you do finally get up to let her know that there's no hard feelings for what happened at 3am.


Member 828787 answered on 7/15/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


Guest

My cat Amber tends to do the same thing. She'll sleep all day, then want to stay up all night. She'll meow because she wants us up with her too. I usually spend ten minutes combing/brushing her and giving her a little personal time. Most of the time that works, but not always. If it continues, I agree that maybe she should be checked out by a vet to be sure there aren't any medical issues. We all know cats rule. I wish you the best.
Karen Hearn
eadmin@verizon.net


Member 785992 answered on 7/15/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


Guest

Some good advice has been given. Start with a vet check up. Night light, Wake up during the day. I call mine from work periodically to wake them up. When I get home its definate wake up time, followed by food time and play. when the night light goes on they know its sleep time again. If you don't mind the baby sleeping with you either in bed or in its own little bed, that could be an alternative. I bought a beautiful doll bed that I had turned into a kitty bed, right next to mine. I don't like the locking them up or seperating idea. I feel that just contributes to their loneliness and then acting out.


Member 654052 answered on 7/15/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


Guest

My cats used to sit outside my bedroom door and meow and claw at it all night wanting attention. If I let them in, they jumped up and down on the bed and moved around all night so we could not sleep. In our first house, I fixed up beds for them in the laundry room where we kept their food and litter box. I trained them to go to bed at the same time I did by offering treats if they went voluntarily. We had a few occassions of chase the kitty, but they wanted the treats. One continued to meow off and on so the vet suggested feliway spray or plug ins. That soothes him and stops the problem. in our new house, they have their own bedroom and there is a feliway plugged in there at all times. All I have to do is start walking towards the hallway at night and they run for their room. We have a bedtime ritual with ear rubs and treats. All is quiet until they hear me up and moving about in the morning.


Member 349183 answered on 7/15/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


Sammy

Try to keep her busy during the day with toys. Buy some new ones and rotate different toys. You can also get a kind of toy like a automatic mouse that goes when it sees motion(walmart),a toy that you can get at petsmart that has a laser light that goes without having to touch a button. By keeping her busy in the day she will be more tired at night. But if she insists to sleep during the day keep her busy at night by doing the same thing that I suggested during the day and another good idea is to hide treats and fun toys around your house that they can find. I hope I could be of help.


Sammy answered on 7/15/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


Snyder

Good Morning!
I had a deaf cat, Kissa, and she was a loud meower for sure! I did treat her a bit differently...only by holding her more than the other cats. I also bought a harness and took her for little walks...that may work for your cat...tire her out in the evening. Hint: put the harness (not the leash) on her first, and let her wear it around the house, so she becomes comfortable with it. I tend to use sign language with my cats, and I always smile when I speak to them. Your life can only be more fulfilling with her in your life. Good luck and take care.


Snyder answered on 7/15/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


Guest

Keep her awake all day and bring her to bed with u at night thats what i did with my kitty hes nutts.


Member 850733 answered on 7/15/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


Shadow

I often show them where I will be sleeping and that helps. The thing I found helps the most is a nightlight it seems to comfort them.
When you go to bed take her with youu sit her on the bed or on a bed beside you with a shirt that smells like you.
Hope this helps


Shadow answered on 7/15/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


Guest

My cat, Matthew, drove me crazy with his crying at night. I took him to the see the vet and found out his anal glands needed to be expressed. He now sleeps at night. If he hadn't of become very noisey during the day I may have not paid any attention. So take your kitty to the vet, have her checked from top to bottom. Usually only dogs have the problem with their anal glands, or so the vet said. I still feel terrible that I waited so long to take Matty in.


Member 808572 answered on 7/15/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


Sophia (Angelica)

hi There Sleepy, I have a kitty ---Sophy, who is 1/4 siamese and she is a talker. I had the notion that if I gave her her own sleeping spot she'd quiet down. Hurrah! I bought her a cushiony bed at a major PET ITEM supplier (petco) and she LOVES it. She kneads the soft sides and settles in. Also, because yours is deaf, you may have to TIME things at precisely the same time every day. I suggest a "treat" when you get out of bed. I say, "good morning, Sophy." And then head for the kitchen, open a drawer, get out her Temptations, pour out around 10-pieces, and she's HAPPY. Write to me directly for more! adreamforum at yahoo dot com. Best of Luck! ---Michael


Sophia (Angelica) answered on 7/15/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


Guest

I too had a cat that cried all night. I didn't know she was deaf until our fire alarm went off in our building and she laid sound asleep on the living room floor. I worked during the day and was away from home so she slept all day. Like your cat, when I was ready to go to bed she was raring to go. I slept on the sofa with her up until 3 or 4 a.m. when she would wake up. I thought she was hungry so I fed her but that didn't help. Finally when I had to get up to go to work she was ready to go to sleep. That went on for 2 years. I never found a solution. I realize now that she was crying loud because she couldn't hear. It's a difficult situation to live with but just give your cat as much love and attention that you can. As hard as it was not to get any sleep for 2 years I wouldn't have given anything for the time spent with my cat.


Member 613615 answered on 7/15/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


Guest

wOW so many responses. Young Living OIls has an oil called peace and calm. I have used it on all my cats at one time or anothers. I just put a drop in my hand, rub my hands togehter and then starts at my cats head rubbing them. Calms down immediately. If interested check out their website www.youngliving.com/judihammond


Member 837225 answered on 7/15/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


Guest

Adopting a new cat is stressful the entire first month.
Please leave out dry cat food and water, clean litterboxes, as well as nightlights .
Until your new cat is adjusted to her new home and OLDER, ( our cat meows at night too, jumps atop the bedroom door,etc.) please try sleeping with the new cat. If this still does not work, close the bedroom door and hope she settles down eventually.
Also try wearing ear plugs at night.
Please be sure that the new cat is held, and loved, and played with every night before bed, and anytime you may be up a few minutes during the night.
Thats the problem with cats. When young they only want us while we sleep, and when older they get sick and die !
Treat her like any other baby. Tend to her as much as possible, love her and use lots of patience.
You need to do this NOW as she is testing you for the rest of her life as to who the BOSS is at night. The BOSS should be YOU not the cat.


Member 612411 answered on 7/15/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


Ajaxx Anthony Fisher

We don't have any experience with deaf cats but my mama has a little trick that might work on tuckering her out at bedtime. Get some catnip & put a teaspoon or so in front of her in her bed & if she's anything like us, she'll get all buzzed out on the catnip & that should lead to some sweet dreams soon after. Mama did that last night to distract us from a project she was working on & noticed shortly afterward that we were all sleeping soundly.

Good luck with your new kitty!!! I'm sure she'll adapt to her new surroundings soon!


Ajaxx Anthony Fisher answered on 7/15/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


Askem

I see you have only had her a week. When Askem came to live with us a few years ago (at age approx. 8 or 9 years) he was up all night yowling. It was so irritating, especially when I had to get up and go to work the next day. My husband & I put up with it because we loved Askem as soon as we saw him and we knew he had gone from pillar to post before he came to us. After a month of this, one night just like a switch had been turned off, he climbed up on the bed with me and slept all night. He's been fine ever since. Just keep letting her know you love her and that she is in her forever home and I think she will eventually come around and relax.

From
Askem's Mom


Askem answered on 7/15/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 1 Report this answer


Sassy

I have had deaf cats and dogs, all of which were very vocal at night when alone. Sometimes a night light worked but with others it didn't. However, I talked my dad into allowing them to sleep in my room. I kept an old blanket on the floor and gave them a cuddle animal, just a stuffed animal they could sleep with. One dog started carrying his "teddy" around with him. Most of these were deaf due to age so a heating pad inside the blanket helped as well. And if you can find one, an old fashioned wind up alarm clock helps. Even though the animal can't hear the ticking, with it inside the blanket, they can feel the vibrations. A radio on during the day kept them calm as well, again, they don't hear it but like deaf people, they can feel the vibration. And I had one that a fan blowing calmed him but he was going blind as well. She is prob just scared and trying to find you because she feels safe with you.


Sassy answered on 7/15/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 1 Report this answer


Jasper

Jasper too was adopted and found it hard to adapt to a house schedule, the concept of being quite at night was difficult as he was used to the noise of a shelter. The BIG thing is DON'T feed them in the middle of the night! Break up your feedings to twice a day; first in the morning when you're getting ready for work, and second just (and I mean just) before you go to bed. Not only is this better for their system but it will keep them occupied during the night.
Second, get some interactive toys and play with them a couple of times a day. The laser did wonders with Jasper. Play with them a couple of times a day for about 10-15 minutes, or when they lay down deciding they've had enough fun. What you're trying to do is get them to adapt to your schedule. Cat's are VERY much creatures of habit and once they figure out you sleep at night it becomes a little easier. Worse case, make a room for them to sleep/meow in at night and in a month or two try having them out at night again.


Jasper answered on 7/16/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


smudge

its alright she just wants attention like with my old cat bunjee....so give her alot of attention or like she said put ear plugs in
so no worries you will be ok


smudge answered on 7/16/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer


maitai

I had a cat that use to do that. I started her playing with a shoe string or any fishing type toy before bedtime to get her tired. It work !she would sleep through the night. Good luck.


maitai answered on 7/16/09. Helpful? Yes/Helpful: No 0 Report this answer