Can Your Personality Influence Your Cat’s Health?

Data from recent studies show that your personality can have a serious impact on your cats health.
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U.K. researchers conducted a study to examine if pet owners’ personality and behavior could affect their cats. Cat owners answered questions about their cats and questions about themselves. The results, published in February in the journal PLOS One, were surprising. Humans who scored high in the “neuroticism” category had cats with more ongoing medical issues, including stress-linked illness, and anxious or fearful behaviors. These cats were also more likely to be overweight. At the other end of the spectrum, owners scoring high on agreeableness, extroversion, conscientiousness and openness were more likely to have cats with fewer health and behavior problems.

About the author:

Jackie Brown is a freelance writer from Southern California who specializes in the pet industry. Reach her at jackiebrownwriter.wordpress.com.

9 thoughts on “Can Your Personality Influence Your Cat’s Health?”

  1. Lucinda J Dustin

    My about to be 6 year old went from outdoor/indoor to indoor cat. I have severe anxiety and have become more or less a recluse. the only outsiders in Ghost’s life are the Vet and caretakers if I have to leave him alone. He mostly travels with me whenever possible, because he is also my calm med for when I have an anxiety attack. I sometimes worry about his being antisocial, although he isn’t mean or threatening to outsiders, he is just gone from sight. He wants for nothing and yes he does have some of my personality traits. He is very healthy, loving and exceptional . And it is an honor to be his keeper. I leave in a small apartment and my entire deck has been made into a catio so if he wants to view the outside world , he can. Cats are able to adapt to their environment. If they are loved, and not smothered or mistreated, I believe they thrive. If your cat is sick, maybe it is time to rethink behavior influences but if happy and attentive, then they are happy.

  2. I am pretty grounded around my 4 uniquely different cats, in fact, they ground me! I have a deep connection with all 4 cats and I communicate intuitively with them all the time. They love being with me and enjoy having human visitors. All 4 are recues with dire origins, from the same shelter.

  3. I have an older cat that I rescued from a shelter. He’s a very shy cat, was in that place for 7 months, and was extremely stressed out. When I brought him home, he’d pulled all the hair off his stomach from overgrooming (a common stress reaction). He pulled out fur in lines along his back legs; all the fur was gone from his ears, and his eyes ran from a serious herpes virus, aggravated by stress. The folks in the shelter were wonderful, but it was extremely noisy — the dogs never shut up.

    The first day I brought him home, he followed me around all day and purred. He was so grateful to be out of that place.

    I have given him an overload of love. Now, four months later, all the fur has grown back, even on his ears, and I can tell he relishes the quiet of my house. I’m home most of the time, so he gets tons of attention. Now he’s eating better and running around the house instead of limping. I really believe the love and the calm atmosphere has been very healing.

  4. I have 3 cats – they are all very different personalities: a commanding in charge female, a smart playful tuxedo, and his sissy buddy. None mimic my personality – I am their daddy.

  5. Kelli Clicquennoi

    Hi, I do believe greatly that a pet owners personality influences your cats health. I adore cats as have 1 in my home, 1 at work that care for outside and one at a bar/restaurant that I attend. The cat at work was abandoned at around 3 years old as found him by the dumpster. He has become my guarding angel. I have 2 houses for him and a separate feeding area. I care for this cat as a child who needs a mother. It took me 10 months for him to become my best friend but now is an absolute vocal/love bug to me. The cat at the bar/restaurant was born feral out in the woods. He has remained here for now 4 1/2 years as I feed him almost every night but 2 per working late. The customers adore this feral cat but he will only allow me to pet, hold and kiss him. I feel that if the pet owner shows unconditional love and attention to their animals the animals will have a healthier life.

  6. I completely disagree about the cat owner thing, I have severe mental health issues, am a natural introvert and have extreme anxiety but at home with my cats we all have a content life and my cats are fine thank you very much. Introverts tend to be better cat parents anyway I think. I think cats get annoyed by the loud, in your face personality of extroverts, I have Autism and cats have very Autistic personalities.

    1. Being an extrovert does not mean ‘loud in your face’ personality. It just means we like being around people more than we like being alone.

      I have two wonderful puddy cats and they love me like I love them.

  7. Pingback: Can Your Persona Affect Your Cat’s Well being? – Cute funny cat kitten pictures videos

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