Cat staring at raw chicken.
Cat staring at raw chicken. Photography © RealCreation | iStock / Getty Images Plus.

Can Cats Eat Raw Chicken?

Can cats eat raw chicken? Can cats eat other types of chicken and chicken bones? We answer your most pressing questions about cats and chicken right here!
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Eating raw meat isn’t a good idea for people because of the bacteria and parasites it can contain. Raw meat can make you very sick — but what about cats? Can cats eat raw chicken? The answer might surprise you.

Can cats eat raw chicken? The basics.

Cat at a table staring at a chicken bone.
Can cats eat raw chicken? What about cooked chicken and chicken bones? Photography © Annashou | iStock / Getty Images Plus.

If people get sick from eating raw chicken, what makes humans think, “Can cats eat raw chicken?” People might easily assume that they can feed their cats raw chicken thinking that our cats’ ancestors survived just fine from hunting and eating raw meat. So, the answer to, “Can cats eat raw chicken?” should be an obvious yes, right?

According to Emmy award-winning vet Dr. Jeff Werber, the domestic cats in our homes aren’t equipped to process meat the same way that wild cats were. “The intestinal tracts of today’s cats and dogs are not the same as their wild ancestors, who tore animals apart and ate them raw,” he says.

Can cats eat raw chicken? The risks.

The biggest risk to cats who eat raw chicken is parasites and intestinal infections. Raw chicken can bring “the potential for parasites such as salmonella, E. coli, listeria and campylobacter,” explains Dr. Werber. He discourages feeding cats any kind of raw meat.  

But can cats eat raw chicken as part of commercially available raw food diets?

If you’re asking, “Can cats eat raw chicken?” and you’re thinking in terms of a raw food diet, the answer is a little bit different. Some vets and cat guardians swear by raw food diets. There are pros and cons to a raw food diet for cats.

Commercially available raw food diets that contain raw chicken are different. These foods are usually manufactured utilizing flash-freezing or high-pressure pasteurization processing (HPP), that kills off harmful bacteria in raw food.

“For those of you who have been feeding your cats a raw diet without a problem, that is fine for your cat,” Dr. Werber advises. “Be cautious, though, about encouraging other cats to ingest raw food that has not been subject to the process of bacteria elimination.”

Can cats eat raw chicken as part of home-prepared raw food diets? Insight from a homeopathic vet

But what about cats who eat raw chicken as part of home-prepared raw diets? Can cats eat raw chicken this way?

“Raw chicken is a perfectly balanced protein for cats to eat,” homeopathic vet Dr. Charles Loops says. “It is suitable as the main protein in a cat’s diet or one of a variety of protein sources. Raw meat is the perfect food for carnivores and cats are carnivores.”

What should cat guardians keep in mind when purchasing raw chicken to use as part of their kitty’s raw diet? “Organic chicken is always preferred but buying chicken, the freshest possible, is the most important,” Dr. Loops advises. “All chicken producers in the US are forbidden to use antibiotics or hormones in growing their chickens.”

How can those feeding cats raw chicken avoid bacteria? “Chicken should always be handled minimally and carefully for the protection of humans,” Dr. Loops says. “Cats are not as susceptible to salmonella bacteria as we are and cats will generally not eat chicken raw if it is not fresh. Raw chicken needs to be discarded once it has reached room temperature for more than a few minutes, so raw chicken can’t be left out for the cat to come back to later.”

Dr. Loops offers some final insight for those who choose to feed raw chicken: “There is really no risk to cats eating raw chicken as long as the above precautions are adhered to,” he states. “It is an excellent protein source for felines.”

How can you prevent cats from eating raw chicken by accident?

As we all know, cats are sneaky. And unlike the chicken mentioned above, which has been carefully selected for raw consumption, some raw chicken might be problematic. Know where your cat is while you’re preparing any food — especially raw meats, like raw chicken — to prevent your cunning kitty from running off with food from your counter or even your stove.

What happens if a cat eats raw chicken by accident?

On another note, you might have searched, “Can cats eat raw chicken?” because your cat accidentally ingested raw chicken that you did not purchase as part of a raw diet.

If your cat accidentally eats raw chicken Dr. Werber encourages cat guardians not to panic. “Keep an eye on your cat,” he explains. “Monitor his/her behavior and eating/elimination activities. If you become alarmed, contact your veterinarian.” If your cat eats some raw chicken, he may experience vomiting or diarrhea. Any kind of intestinal upset is a good time to contact a veterinarian.

Can cats eat raw chicken on the bone?

Another common question associated with, “Can cats eat raw chicken?” is, “Can cats eat chicken bones?” Although feeding cats raw chicken in any form is not recommended by some veterinarians, there is an extra danger associated with chicken bones. Dr. Werber explains that chicken bones are “soft and easily broken and have sharp edges that can injure internally.”

If your cat swallows chicken bones, do not try to induce vomiting as the bones can cause more harm coming up. Dr. Werber advises feeding your cat bread to try to coat any sharp edges as they pass through your cat’s digestive track and contact your veterinarian immediately.

Can cats eat cooked chicken?

Most cats, unless they have sensitivities to poultry, can eat cooked chicken. However, serve your cat plain cooked chicken only. Chicken should not be breaded, greasy or prepared with any sort of spices or seasonings, which can be dangerous or upset your cat’s digestive system. Only feed small quantities of cooked chicken to your cat as a treat. Feeding large amounts of chicken to your cats won’t provide your cat with a balanced diet and can lead to digestive upsets.

Thumbnail: Photography © RealCreation | iStock / Getty Images Plus. 

This article was originally published on March 14, 2019 and modified to include insight from a homeopathic vet on March 25, 2019. 

 

Read more about what cats can (and can’t!) eat on Catster.com

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42 thoughts on “Can Cats Eat Raw Chicken?”

  1. LOL sort of lost your credability as a scientifically correct article when quoting a
    “homeopathic vet”.
    It’s amazing that someone that actually has some kind of medical training (albeit for animals so I guess the standards aren’t as high as “real” med schools) seriously is promoting homeopathy. Insane, really. Someone that understands anything about how basic chemistry works should understand that if you dillute something untill there is not a single molecule left of it, it’s not going to have any effect as a medicine since, well… It’s not there anymore. A child would umderstand this. But apparently not “homeopathic vet Dr. Charles Loops” you quote in this article.

    These insane people are seriously DANGEROUS to our animals. We can make choises if we want to trust homepathy as a treatment instead of medicine, but animals CAN’T.

    Here is an article where a thousand come together to ban this pseudosciense from being practised by veterinarians in the U.K.
    I was surprised that a developed country even had enough people seriously believing in this “snake-oilery” nonsense to have to make a petition like that. The more you know.

    Anyways, terrible article that I don’t trust at all. I will go back to google and look for the facts somewhere else.

    1. The above writer clearly has never experience the effectiveness of homeopathy. There was a time that the US had multiple homeopathic hospitals. The only reason we don’t have them today is that the AMA ran off the competition. Europa still uses homeopathy today due to its effectiveness particularly for chronic conditions something Western medicine fails to resolve. They can treat you and get you on the drug gravy train which you never get off. In fact every drug on the market has side effects. If taken long enough you too will developers side effects. To which you will be given another drug to treat. This goes on and on. Some folks are in 11-17 drugs. None of which have ever been tested on how they effect one another. It is a conundrum. I’m not against Western Medicine. If you have a stroke don’t go to a homeopath but post sequelae or other conditions look elsewhere that Western Medicine and get your health back. .

    2. Ah, another close-minded pet owner that has never REALLY researched ALL the facts and research available. Dr. Loops is bravely offering alternative info but yes more cited research on both ur parts wd have been more informative for us consumers.

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  5. I’m so happy to see so many responses pointing out the misinformed & fear mongering about raw. To take a phrase from the pro-choice movement “We won’t go back” to commercial kibble. My sister’s cat had 4 kittens, I took 2, she kept 1 & gave 1 to a friend. I feed mine mostly raw or whole prey with some canned or dehydrated foods. My boys were the 1st & last born(the runt). The runt did not even recognize dry food as editable when my sister tried to feed them as kittens, thank goodness. Looking at the other 2 brothers who are in homes feeding kibble, you can see they are…mushy. This is how I was used to thinking of cats before I switched to raw. My boys are so muscular and lean looking, like the gods they are! They just feel different & my sister comments how soft their fur is. She is beginning to see the light & make better food choices even if she can’t go where I am. My 4 cats eat plenty of raw 1 day old chicken & mouse/rats bones when they eat whole prey I buy frozen online. 1 cat has communicated to me that he requires the chicken feet to be cut off before serving. They are dirty & scratch his lining on the way down and could cause problems/illness sometimes. Since he told me this, I cut off the feet & he has had NO issues in many years since. Sometimes my husband will try to give him a chicken I haven’t prepped yet but on those occasions he leaves the toes or throws them up. I have also found that I can feed them chicken that has gone really bad because I left in the fridge bin for over a week, by cooking it in a crock pot for a day, thigh/leg bone and all with a teaspoon or 2 of vinager to soften the bones. I even ate the meat to test it on myself, not only did I not get sick, but it tasted ok! Good to know in a survival situation. After that the bones are so soft I can squeeze them in my fingers & they turn to mush. I still send them through the grinder to be turned into mash. This bone mash is what gives pate canned food it’s consistency. Sometimes I mix the bone mash into natural peanut butter cookie treats for our dog or leave the softened whole bones for the mice outside my door during the winter. It helps me see where their active holes are & keeps them out of my garage/house looking for food. Zero waste and win/win for a whole ecology of critters! You couldn’t even pay me off to switch back…unlike what commercial food companies are doing to young vets & anyone they can. Even the FDA tries to stop the raw food companies by storing samples at incorrect temps. then testing & accusing the little companies of being in violation b/c samples have bacteria. It’s truly sick how they try to destroy these little companies. They can’t afford the loss from recalls, puts them out of business. This is what almost happened to my supplier Hare Today, Gone Tomorrow. Had they not scrambled to research & think to request the temp. storage data of samples this would have been them. This war against raw is a racket. I understand there are lots of reasons not everyone can do raw foods just like not everyone can breastfeed their kids for 2yrs. Fine, do the best by your pets that you can & give us the freedom to do the same. No need to constantly demonize raw & spread lies. Even with the truth, plenty of people will still choose to buy canned & dry because of convience. Just stop with the lies & misinformation ok?

    1. I will say this article at least provided a narrow path in which it could be ok to feed raw so thanks for that small…bone?

    2. Melody Maynard

      Natalie W. Thank you for all of the information that you so kindly provided on this site. I am interested in trying to start my purebred Persian cat on a raw food diet because I was told by another person that it was best and have been looking for information but a lot of it is so contradictory so I am not sure where to go for the best information. If you happen to have any additional information could you plz let me know.
      My persian who’s name is Isabella is 6 years old now and I’ve noticed her coat is thinning and not as lux as it once was and seems like she doesn’t stay interested in food that I buy her. She grows bored of it very quickly and I have to switch to another brand and style often. I am wondering if a raw food diet is what she prefers instead. I have tried to feed her small pieces of raw defrosted chicken breast that was flash frozen but she will resist so I hand fed to get her to take a taste. She is finicky to say the least and it is ALWAYS an uphill battle trying to find food that she will be interested in.
      Thank You so much in advance.
      Have an excellent day
      Melody M

      1. If a cat is vitamin deficient he will avoid foods that make him more so, thus one reason they will ‘burn’out’ on some brands, or the company changed to cheaper ingredients to make more money etc.
        Mercola.com has people and pet supplements and his Vet partner Dr Becker has tons of articles, videos that will help u.

  6. I’m extremely disappointed to see catster post such inaccurate information. I sincerely hope everyone who reads this post will take everything said with a grain of salt.

  7. This is mostly false information.
    I know many families who’s cats thrive on a raw food diet. Even my four cats have for over a year. There’s always the risk of e.coli or other harmful bacteria, even in commercial pet foods. That includes raw, wet/canned and dry/kibble.
    Raw is the most biologically appropriate diet for cats, followed by high protein canned foods. Kibble lacks the moisture and minimally processed protein that cats need to thrive.
    Stop spreading false information.

  8. This article is factually incorrect (grossly incorrect) about feline evolutionary biology and the modern cat’s digestive tract. This article should be removed.

  9. Raw saved my cat’s life. Food allergies, poor motility and a sensitive gut made it impossible for him to keep commercial food down. Raw keeps him strong, healthy and not vomiting. When I got another cat, I fed him raw too.

    Both my raw fed cats are by far more lean and muscular than my prior cats who were fed dry and canned commercial food. I feel great knowing that I control the quality of the meat and supplements in the raw food diet that I make at home.

    Never going back to commercial food ever! Anyone reading this considering a raw food diet – do it!!! Feeding your cats raw meat as nature intended is one of the best ways of caring for them.

  10. Ahhahaha, written by a fantasy fiction and dog lifestyle writer. What were you thinking Catster? Perhaps leave writing about nutrition to someone more informed, like Dr. Eric Barchas for example, who says in the Catster article about cats eating eggs that an awful lot of cats are doing very well on raw diets, and that if you accept the risk and wish to feed raw then that is your business. Cat parents who feed fresh are networking and supporting each other despite the ongoing anti-raw campaign pushed primarily by the pet food industry, the same industry that has been treating our pets as living landfills for decades! We can, are, and will continue to do better by our cats. Fear mongering and positioning an entire industry against feeding a fresh and balanced species appropriate diet is not the right answer.

  11. Ahhahaha, written by a fantasy fiction and dog lifestyle writer. What were you thinking Catster? Perhaps leave writing about nutrition to someone more informed, like Dr. Eric Barchas for example, who says in the Catster article about cats eating eggs that an awful lot of cats are doing very well on raw diets, and that if you accept the risk and wish to feed raw then that is your business. Cat parents who feed fresh are networking and supporting each other despite the ongoing anti-raw campaign pushed primarily by the pet food industry, the same industry that has been treating our pets as living landfills for decades! We can, are, and will continue to do better by our cats. Fear mongering and positioning an entire industry against feeding fresh food is not the right answer.

  12. I am so disappointed about the lack of knowledge about cat nutrition and about cats in general! It shows clearly that you aren’t an expertise centre, but only another site in the claws of the major pet food manufacturers who will have us believe that their food is best. How can we ever believe any of your advice after this load of nonsense?
    Why do I think this? My cats were sick on those ‘highly-recommended processed to death’ foods and have been happy and healthy since switching to raw. I make my own, use a lot of chicken (which my cats love) in a balanced mix.
    Anyway, I now know that I won’t have to bother visiting your site for advice on cats in future!

  13. Cats are unique in that they remain virtually identical both physically and genetically to their wild counerparts and ancestors, even after thousanda of years of (self) domestication. Cats and dogs naturally harbor salmonella and E. coli, as well as many people do.The difference is that cats and dogs are biologically designed to be able to handle much higher levels of contamination than people. Their digestive tracts are short and highly acidic, with cats having the shorter of the two, and their digestive tract is more acidic than dogs and most of the animal kingdom. All that said, that doesn’t mean that bacteria can’t make them sick, because it can. It’s also not a raw specific issue. Salmonella is a huge issue in kibble as are heterocyclic amines that aren’t even measured in pet food. Their immune system has a threshold, but we don’t really have a way to know what that is or how contaminated any given food might be – and think about it, your salad is just as dangerous.

    Over 70% of the immune system is in the gut so while the highly acidic environment is one piece, the other is a healthy gut microbiome and many things can affect that. Probiotics can help to combat Salmonella, Listeria, E. coli, and other pathogenic bacteria. S. boulardii is especially effective against Salmonella and E. coli with some advantage over Lactobacillus because it is resistant to antibiotics. Digestive enzymes can also help support a successful transition when their stomach ph adjusts back to what it should naturally be.

    As for bones, RAW meaty bones of an appropriate size are excellent for cats. Cats get smaller bones, basically any bone you can snap with your fingers. Only feed raw meaty bones, never ever cooked bones and only bones with the meat still on – hence the term “raw meaty bones (RMB)”. I stay close by to supervise, but have never had an issue. Chicken wing tips and the middle flat section, chicken necks, duck feet, small rabbits, cornish hen, quail, thin poultry rib cage bones, and mouse (of course) are all good options. Kittens would start out with something like a chicken wing tip, piece of cornish hen or quail, and perhaps a small section of chicken neck or soft rib section. CatCentric.org, Feline-Nutrition.org, and catinfo.org are a few highly regarded resources for anyone wishing to learn more about how to feed a fresh and balanced species appropriate diet to your obligate carnivore.

  14. Both of my cats were on homemade raw chicken diets. One of them died at 16 from an aggressive cancer. The other developed CKD at age 8. We hydrated her, eventually daily. Except for the CKD, she was very healthy and lived to be 22. BTW, the only food transmitted illnesses they ever had (one each) were caused by soil borne pathogens from the small amount of carrot in their diet.

  15. we have a Bengal crossbred 5yo boy, and a male and female younger cats under 2
    they LOVE raw kangaroo meat so I give them little bits chopped finely as an occasional treat they just keep wanting more and know the smell of it in the groceries so try to rip it out of the packet before I can put it away is it okay for them to eat this meat ? ive tried giving it to them plainly cooked but they turn up their noses and refuse to eat it cooked they also love chopped cooked vegies like what we eat and my 2yo boy Simba loves cooked carrot and potato especially mashed potato and will steal it off our plates if he gets a chance are all these foods okay for our fur babies to eat????

    1. Yes, cats should be fed raw meat and raw bones and raw organs. The ideal balance of a raw diet for a cat is 82/83% muscle meat / 7/8% bone / 5% liver / 5% other secreting organ and a rotation of not less than three different meat proteins. Cats should not be fed carbs as they do not digest them easily and what is digested turns to sugar and makes them gain weight…If you want to read about cat nutrition I recommend the websites Catcentric. org that taught me a lot about what I really should have always been feeding my cats, and aslo Feline_nutrition. org. If you feed kibble, you really should educate yourself about why it is the worst possible thing to feed cats. I am aware that raw feeders like me sound crazy to most pet owners. Only because most pet owners are not informed about nutrition for their pets. Look up the definition of an obligate carnivore and what they eat. A domestic cat is an obligate carnivore.

  16. That’s true about some meat packing companies not handling their meats properly, and therefore causing people and animals to become sick. But over all, I agree that it would be a good idea to either boil the meat or at least cook it in a pan to kill all the bacteria. At least it won’t be over processed like the commercial foods. I realize that most of the commercial pet foods are “junk” but if you’re on a limited income like me, then it’s easier and cheaper to feed cats the commercial foods. My cats have been eating foods like Fancy Feast, and Friskies canned foods for most of their lives and so far they are doing fine. They might be a bit overweight, (not fat) but at least they are healthy. But if I were going to feed my cats chicken, turkey, fish, beef, or pork, I would either boil it, or brown it in a pan just to kill most of the germs. As they say, better safe than sorry.

    1. Nancy overweight cats are not healthy. Please cut back a little on their canned foods and encourage plenty of exercise to help them get back to a healthy weight. Feeding lightly cooked meats as a snack is fine, just make sure not to give them more than about 10% of their total daily intake in these meats, without balancing them. As you can see by the other posts here, balanced raw feeding isn’t dangerous, should you ever decide to try it.

  17. This article exemplifies the nutritional ignorance of vets who do no further nutritional education beyond what is required of them.

    Of all domesticated pets, cats are actually biologically closest to their ancestors. Humans have only been feeding commercial food since the 50s. Dogs and cats both still digest food exactly the same now as they did before we started making “pet food”. In fact, just like humans, cats, dogs, parrots, hamsters, fish, etc, all thrive on real foods. Just like fast food is bad for your kids, processed food is harmful to your animals.

    Yes, when you’ve been feeding your animals processed food for years, they’re going to have stomach upset briefly the first time you give them real food. If you grew up on french fries and tried to eat carrots for the first time, you’d likely get digestive upset. Does that mean stick with french fries? No.

    All kibble is high in carbohydrates! You can’t make kibble without a binder, otherwise it can’t keep it shape. Binders are always made up of ingredients high in carbs. Look to see how many carbs are in any bag of kibble. What, you can’t find the carbs count on the bag? It’s like they don’t want you to know! Here’s how to figure out how many carbs are in bag of kibble: Add up the percentages of protein, fat, fiber, moisture, and the last couple of % from the tiny extras, then subtract that number from 100. The remainder is the percentage of carbs in the food.

    These types of articles are so frustrating. And with the growing number of raw feeders out today, I’m surprised you’d run this type of article and expect to retain readership.

  18. Some ignorance in this article. First off, and most glaring is the statement about raw chicken bones splintering – that is FALSE! Raw bone granulates when crunched on into harmless, but nutritious tiny spheres. There is no danger from feeding raw chicken bone. Cooked bone will splinter – do NOT FEED cooked bone. Second point – the most nutritious and healthy food for a cat is raw chicken/turkey liver. In my 65 years I have helped many cats heal from a variety of issues (including cancer) by feeding raw chicken liver. If a cat will not eat, liquify the liver in a blender and use an oral feeding syringe. Also a good idea to add a bit of cooked brown rice for bulk (and a supplement like Nuvet.com). Keep in mind that a cat that will not eat does not mean the cat is not hungry – it means the cat cannot smell the food.

  19. I have an adult female cat who only eats cooked chicken and cooked beef (like a roast) she will eat a small amount of grain free dry cat food that is all she has ever eaten now she was 2yrs old when I saved her from being put down at the pound . I do not know what she was feed prior to that she was very skinny when I got her she I a very sweet cat now she is about 7yrs old now. I do foster and last year I fostered 5 kittens and ended up keeping 2 of them they both eat cooked meat and love it they are both black and super shinny. I also have a male who will not touch any kind of cooked meat it has to come out of a can or be dry food. So as you can see there are all kinds. I also feed feral cats and they have no problem killing and eating raw meat.

    1. You are partially right about how you are feeding your cats, but you do need to learn a bit more about cat nutrition and the optimal diet for a cat as some of what you do is not the best way to feed a cat. I recommend reading about this in the website Catnutrition. org. ad feline-nutrition. org. Before you become offended, do the reading. If after that, you find that what I have said here is wrong, then be offended. You will be pleased that you did the research. I was. And both my cats are raw fed a balanced raw diet.

  20. To add ….
    All the pet foods (Iams, Hills Science, Friskies, etc.) are owned by companies that make junk food (Mars, Inc,) and personal hygiene products (Colgate Palmolive, Proctor and Gamble) for humans.
    ?????????
    Is that who you trust with your treasured fur family members for their nutritional health?????

  21. This article is not accurate at all. Frankly, I’m surprised a site dedicated to cats wouldn’t do proper research on raw feeding chicken, or any other protein. Cats are obligate carnivores.
    Where do you buy your chicken if you’re concerned about parasites and samonella. The danger is mishandling of it by humans!!! You feed your cat the same chicken you would buy for yourself. The only raw flesh you need to worry about is hunted meat you hunt yourself. That needs to be frozen for at least two weeks before serving it up to your pet.
    Non weight bearing bones are perfectly fine to give to cats. It keeps their teeth pearly white and clean.
    My cat has been raw fed chicken, duck, beef and rabbit for four years – bone and all. His fur has never been silkier and he hasn’t had a mat in those four years. BTW, he’s a Maine Coon and 17 years old.

  22. This article is not accurate at all. Frankly, I’m surprised a site dedicated to cats wouldn’t do proper research on raw feeding chicken, or any other protein. Cats are obligate carnivores.
    Where do you buy your chicken if you’re concerned about parasites and samonella. The danger is mishandling of it by humans!!! You feed your cat the same chicken you would buy for yourself. The only raw flesh you need to worry about is hunted meat you hunt yourself. That needs to be frozen for at least two weeks before serving it up to your pet.
    Non weight bearing bones are perfectly fine to give to cats. It keeps their teeth pearly white and clean.
    My cat has been raw fed chicken, duck, beef and rabbit for four years – one and all. His fur has never been silkier and he hasn’t had a mat in those four years. BTW, he’s a Maine Coon and 17 years old.

  23. Our Pixie Bob has been on a combination of high quality grain free chicken kibble and raw chicken since he was a kitten. The breeder advised it. He gets free feed kibble and a serving of raw chicken every other day. He’s 8 years old and quite healthy. I know many other Pixie owners that do the same thing.

    Mind you, we cut the chicken into portions and freeze it. Whatever is left by the time we go to bed is disposed of.

    1. Kibble is the worst possible food that a cat or kitten can be fed…And feeding kibble along with raw meat is not advised. A cat who is fed canned food can be fed up to 15% raw meat without having to balance it. After that it must be balanced . Read about cat nutrition in the websites Catcentric.org and Feline.nutrition.org and what is meant by “balanced” before you dismiss what I have said. I raw feed my two cats but had five cats live with me over the previous twenty five years and wish that I had known then what I know now about feeding them a diet that an obligate carnivore needs to be fed to thrive….. Any company that sells dry food for cats and dogs does not have the best interests of our pets. What I have learned about how dry food affects our pets, long term, has taught me that dogs and cats should never have been fed this kind of diet. Dry dog and cat food has made many pets very ill with kidney and IBD and cystitis and diabetes and cancer. These diseases are now common among our pets, but were apparently almost unknown before the introduction of dry pet foods.

  24. Mr. Lowrey,
    There are many recipes out there on how to safely make raw food yourself at home.
    Just make sure:
    You buy it from a trusted butcher (fresh)
    not grocery store (they freeze and then thaw)
    You don’t buy it already ground (grows bacteria faster)
    You freeze it (for the first time) for about 5 days to make sure you kill all bacteria.
    You will have 20 years more to take care of your babies cuz they will thrive!!

  25. I have fed my cats a raw meat diet for decades and they have never had a problem. I use TC Feline mix with raw ground turkey and beef.

  26. “Well, the domestic cats in our homes aren’t equipped to process meat the same way that wild cats were. ”
    So every feral cat that you see, even the ones that live long lives, surviving on nothing but rodents and birds are a figment of all our imaginations? You start off the article with a complete fabrication – The domestic cat is far more similar biologically to its ancestors than dogs.
    This silly site gets almost every fact wrong when it tries to be “scientific” and the reason is obvious, they’re trying to push retail pet foods. Gimme a break… unsubscribed

    1. What an absolutely idiotic argument. Feral cats? “Even the ones that survive a long time”? That is like saying “Smoking is GREAT! My grandmother smoked a pack a day and lived to be 94! Taking anomalous samples…like feral cats that live beyond the average feral cat lifespan of LESS THAN TWO YEARS, shows that you either have zero education, or were hoping others didn’t. And it is clearly the former.

      But I guess when you saw the frantic posting on catcentric about his article saying “We MUST go to that article and spam the comment section! Everyone will think we all just found the page separately…all on the same day, and posted basically the same copy pasta!” you thought you did your good deed for the day. But know this…your cat wants to eat your corpse. Because it is hard for a cat to realize that it is smarter than its human. But your cat figured that out when it was still a kitten.

  27. A few months ago I switched my cat to a commercially processed frozen raw/freeze dried raw diet. She loves it. The positive changes that have occurred are quite remarkable. I wouldn’t trust myself to attempt feeding her raw otherwise for fear of improper food preparation.

  28. Janice Giannolla

    I have been feeding my 14 year old cat raw chicken for years. Once in the morning, rest of the day dry and canned at dinner time. I only buy trusted popular brands. So far, so good. But this article was great and I will always continue to monitor the litter box.

  29. Funny this was written by a person who it looks like deals mostly with dogs—although I feed my dogs raw homemade chicken as well as my 32 cats (it’s a rescue). Maria is absolutely correct that kibble is the absolute worst—especially for obligate carnivores. I’ve been feeding raw for years with no problems (I also am very careful). Look at all the recalls of manufactured food—dogs and cats dying right and left—even and especially Hill’s Science Diet foods. Nope, I’ll continue feeding my animals a species-appropriate diet just as I feed my poultry, goats, and horses species-appropriate diets.

  30. So, what is your stance on raw food for cats made by companies, or owners at home making a balanced raw food for their animals? What about chicken necks, duck necks, or turkey necks?
    Kibble is never the answer. A vet telling owners to buy a bag of dry kibble to feed for the rest of their lives is like a doctor handing parents a bag of food saying this is what you’re going to feed them for the rest of their lives. It makes no sense. Kibble is highly processed- dead crap. Yes, there are high quality kibble companies out there, BUT it still is not good enough for our fur babies. Yes, cats and dogs can live long lives on kibble, but that doesn’t mean they are thriving! To me it is common sense, we have learned over the years that processed food is NOT GOOD FOR US, so why is it okay for animals? It isn’t. This article . Why is obesity and diabetes in pets so high? Why are animals starting to have teeth issues as early as the age of 3?!?… DIET.

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