Kittens

Looking for a kitten? Have a kitten? Learn about kittens from the experts.

There's nothing sweeter than a curious kitten with big, bright eyes, playful paws and an appetite for adventure. Our kittens section covers all you need to know about these adorable little guys, from the time you take one home to the moment you can call your kitten a full-grown cat. Learn how to prepare your home for a kitten, get the lowdown on what vaccines are needed at each stage of your kitten's life, and bone up on basic litter box training. Our experts provide advice on how to deal with house training, spaying or neutering, keeping your kitten’s claws off the sofa, and then some.

Talk About Kittens

How to Stop Your Kitten from Biting and Scratching

First of all, take note that your baby is being a baby! He is teething, and will go right on teething until he is about 6 months. Discourage your kitten by walking away or gently picking him up and placing him on the floor. NEVER chastise. Your baby is just like a human baby. They need to be shown the right thing to do, not the wrong side of your hand! The same goes for scratching and climbing. Gently pick him up and place him by his scratching post - do not shout as he will take this behavior as a good way to get your attention. When he scratches his post on his own, then reward him with lots of "Good Boy!"s. Treat climbing the same. Place him at the bottom of his activity center if he starts on the curtains!

North-West S., owner of a Siamese

When to Vaccinate Your Kitten

Kittens need their combo vaccine (FVRCPC) starting at 6 or 8 weeks and it is a series of 3 shots, with 2 or 4 week intervals in between. This is essential for building a healthy immune system, so no you cannot delay them or what would be the point of vaccinating? Rabies would not be necessary for an indoor only cat, nor feline leukemia. I do not vaccinate for these if indoor-only because of the unnecessary risk of side effects. But this does mean your cat must remain indoor only. Definitely do de-worming and stool tests for parasites. Vaccines are -not- expensive. If you have to ask about cost concerns on here, then definitely do not get two cats. If you have to ask about whether or not you can delay vaccinations or not give them at all, please consider not getting a cat. A FVRCPC shot or a vet visit cost about the same amount as a high quality bag of cat food, so if you can't afford that, please don't get a cat and then give it mediocre care.

Chrysee H., owner of a Ragdoll

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