Kittens

Looking for a kitten? Have a kitten? Learn about kittens from the experts.

There's nothing sweeter than a curious kitten with big, bright eyes, playful paws and an appetite for adventure. Our kittens section covers all you need to know about these adorable little guys, from the time you take one home to the moment you can call your kitten a full-grown cat. Learn how to prepare your home for a kitten, get the lowdown on what vaccines are needed at each stage of your kitten's life, and bone up on basic litter box training. Our experts provide advice on how to deal with house training, spaying or neutering, keeping your kitten’s claws off the sofa, and then some.

Talk About Kittens

How to Stop Your Kitten from Biting and Scratching

First of all, take note that your baby is being a baby! He is teething, and will go right on teething until he is about 6 months. Discourage your kitten by walking away or gently picking him up and placing him on the floor. NEVER chastise. Your baby is just like a human baby. They need to be shown the right thing to do, not the wrong side of your hand! The same goes for scratching and climbing. Gently pick him up and place him by his scratching post - do not shout as he will take this behavior as a good way to get your attention. When he scratches his post on his own, then reward him with lots of "Good Boy!"s. Treat climbing the same. Place him at the bottom of his activity center if he starts on the curtains!

North-West S., owner of a Siamese

How to Stop Kittens from Playing too Rough

Get your kittens used to having their claws trimmed now. Ask a vet, a vet tech or a groomer to show you how to trim their claws. If you start now, they will be used to it by the time they are adult cats and won't fight you. Also, understand that you are now the "mama cat." When the kittens start going at it and you see it's getting rough, separate them even if you have to put one in another room until it calms down. When they realize they will be separated from the fun, they'll think twice before being so rough. You can also wear them out by playing with them yourself. This is important in socializing them. Get a feather teaser pole or a laser light and play with them. You can also try furry catnip mice, and other toys to keep them occupied. They'll get tired out and won't be so rough on each other.

Joy W., owner of a Maine Coon mix

See full discussion »