Kittens

Looking for a kitten? Have a kitten? Learn about kittens from the experts.

There's nothing sweeter than a curious kitten with big, bright eyes, playful paws and an appetite for adventure. Our kittens section covers all you need to know about these adorable little guys, from the time you take one home to the moment you can call your kitten a full-grown cat. Learn how to prepare your home for a kitten, get the lowdown on what vaccines are needed at each stage of your kitten's life, and bone up on basic litter box training. Our experts provide advice on how to deal with house training, spaying or neutering, keeping your kitten’s claws off the sofa, and then some.

Talk About Kittens

Introducing Your New Kitten to Your Older Cat

Kittens will most likely get along great because they are so young, although it may take a day or two. My two cats were about 10 months when I brought home two kittens and it didn't go smoothly at all. The young kittens were excited to meet the older cats but the older cats were petrified of them. What I learned is that cats react to smell and it's best to introduce them that way first. The advice from a cat expert was: keep them separate and give them each something that smells of the other one (towel/blanket etc). Once that goes well, then introduce them physically. It was fascinating because when I presented my cats with the towel smelling like the new kittens, the cats hissed and swatted at it, then ran in fear. Eventually they started to investigate it. You may not need this step but I wanted to share it just in case.

Cindy W., owner of a Breed Unknown

How to Keep Your Kitten from Eating Your Food

You will need to become super vigilant about picking up wrappers and throwing them away. If you put the trashcan in a cabinet, purchase those child safety locks and put it on the cabinet door. Rinse and wash all plates right after you're done. If you like to sit and chat around the dinner table, you'll have to do it without your dinner plates in front of you. You can put him in the other room while you eat. If you truly want to break him of this habit, you'll need to make sure that no human food is left out anywhere in your apartment. You can also purchase "canned air" from an office supply store and when he jumps up to scarf food off your plates, give him a blast of the air (but not in the face). It takes vigilance and dedication on your part and that of anyone else who lives with you, but your cat can be trained to leave your food alone.

Joy W., owner of a Maine Coon mix

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