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No Cat Left Behind: It's Adopt a Less-Adoptable Pet Week

Black cats, senior cats, special-needs, and blind cats -- they deserve forever homes as much as "perfect" kitties.

 |  Sep 19th 2012  |   17 Contributions


As if it isn't hard enough for "perfect" cats to find homes because to the overwhelming number of them in shelters and rescues, just imagine how much harder it is for a cat that is slightly less than perfect.

"Why won't you listen to me?" Ginger cat by Shutterstock.

Black cats are often overlooked because they look boring or not as cute as cats with spots or stripes or splotches. Senior cats are a tough sell because, well, they aren't cuddly kittens anymore. Special-needs cats, like those who are FIV+ or have other medical or behavioral issues, are passed up because they may need more vet care and treatment. And people are worried that blind cats will be unable to adjust to their homes.

Whatever the reason, 99 percent of shelters in the U.S. report that they have totally adoptable pets like these, who often wait four times longer than others to get adopted -- and some of them wait for more than two years.

Mangy-looking cat by Shutterstock

So that's why we love Petfinder's Adopt-a-Less-Adoptable-Pet Week. We're all over any excuse to highlight some fabulous cats who need a little extra help finding their forever homes -- maybe it's your home?

Black Cats

The plight of black cats is near and dear to my heart. They are the least likely to make it out of shelters, simply because they have no distinct markings, so people choose other "prettier" or "cuter" cats first. I say that's crazy! Black cats are gorgeous. 

Pharoah is at Cats Exclusive in Margate, FL. I have met him, and he is a love. He was dumped in a box in a parking lot and brought in by a Good Samaritan who found him. He comes when you snap your fingers or pat your hands on a lap -- he thinks he's a dog! For more info on Pharoah, visit his Petfinder page or call Cats Exclusive at (954) 975-8349.

FIV+ cats

Feline immunodeficiency virus, or FIV, is a virus that can be spread to other cats -- but don't stop reading just yet. It is spread through aggressive contact and crazy cat fighting, so most cats will never have this issue. FIV+ cats can be tremendous loves, and as long as you don't have any super-aggressive cats in your household, they can live great with other cats without FIV. FIV+ cats can live long, wonderful lives, and deserve homes just as much as any other cat. 

Sylvester is with Fancy Cats Rescue Team in Herndon, VA. He is FIV+ and loves to snuggle up on a fluffy blanket and be scratched behind his ears and on top of his head. For info on Sylvester, see his Petfinder page or email info@fancycats.org. See some of Fancy Cats' other FIV+ cats here. (I especially love Lorenzo the Lover, as I was a big part of his rescue from a high-kill shelter in Georgia.)

Senior Cats

While we're on the subject of living long, wonderful lives, why not consider adopting a senior cat? When these cats end up in shelters, it's likely because their owners surrendered them. These wonderful cats deserve to live the rest of their lives in a happy home, not in a shelter. Older cats are usually calm and quiet and easier to add to your home than a rambunctuous kitten. 

Dash is a sensational senior man-cat at Texas Cares in Plano, TX. He is a mellow fellow who would love to keep you company and read or knit with you. And if you scratch him just right, he'll even do a somersault! For more info on Dash, check out his Petfinder page or email adoption@texascares.org.

Blind Cats

Just because blind cats can't see doesn't mean they can't love you. And they can live in your home easily, too, since cats are tremendously adaptable. A cat missing one or both eyes is the same on the inside as any other cat with both eyes -- perfect.

Lenox is a blind boy who just recently lost his best friend and brother, Diamond. Lenox was born with eye problems and had to have them removed. He's totally fine now and has been in search of his forever home for years. He is currently in foster care for Animal Aid. You can read more about him in this post I wrote or email animalaidinc@aol.com for more info.

Special Needs

Some cats just need a little extra care or maybe a few extra vet visits to keep them happy and healthy. It may take a little more time or money on your part, but giving them a home can be even more rewarding.

Webster is a 13-year-old tabby at Tabby's Place with heart disease and a few other issues. He requires medication and an echocardiogram every 4 to 6 months, but he's an affectionate lap cat who would love to live in your home. For more information about Webster, check out his adoption page

Disabled Cats

Animals don't get hung up things like losing a leg or an ear. Many times, these cats function and go about their day just like normal cats, and you wouldn't even know the difference. And yet, because they look different, they are often passed over.

Lucky Lucy was brought in to Spalding Animal Control (a high-kill shelter) in Georgia as a tiny kitten with one of her legs hanging on by a thread. Winging Cat Rescue rescued her and amputated the leg, and now she is 100 percent fabulous and friendly and perfect -- and yet, a year later, she is still looking for her forever home. For more info on Lucky Lucy, visit her Petfinder page or email blowe@optonline.net.

How Can You Help Without Adopting?

One way is to look at Petfinder's Less-Adoptable-Pet Gallery and share one or two cats in your area with your Facebook or Twitter friends. Getting the word out helps. Who knows who might see it?

Have a blog or Web site? Place one of Petfinder's Less-Adoptable-Pet Week badges up and help increase awareness for these special pets. 

Every single pet deserves a home. Let's make a push together to help them this week ... and every week!

 

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