FURMINATOR GIVEAWAY
FURminator and Catster are giving away one FURminator classic a day to cats who are members of Catster’s FURminator group. Click here to enter — you can enter once each day through the end of the contest.

GOT CAT HAIR?

If you read Skeezix’s review of the FURminator a few months ago, you’d know we swear by the tool as the most effective way of grooming cats to remove loose hair and prevent hairballs. I’ve been a huge FURminator fan since the tool was launched and was recently given the opportunity to test drive a pair a new-and-improved FURminator shedding tools: the FURminator Double Edge deShedding Tool and the fur-ejecting “FURminator FURejector.”

The timing was excellent. We’d just had a couple of back-to-back heat waves that invariably ratchet up the amount of fur that the cats shed. Trying out each of the two tools on three different cats, I removed the hair shown in the pile in the photo above after just one session. Although FURminator classic scarcely needs to be improved upon, these new tools offer some benefits that might fit your grooming needs.

FURminator Double Edge deShedding Tool
<With two blades instead of one, this version of the FURminator removes cat hair twice as fast. This is a boon for two of my cats, Rocky and Trip. Rocky suffers from hyper stimulation on his back, a common affliction that causes discomfort after a only a little bit of petting or grooming. If you have a cat who recoils when pet or brushed on her back, you know what I mean. Rocky enjoys the FURminator — he settles in and purrs like crazy when I FURminate him, but he gets overstimulated quickly along his back which ends the session (I usually groom him everywhere else and leave the back for last). The back is the area that needs the most grooming, however — it’s the point most difficult for cats (especially geezer cats like Rocky) to reach.

The double-blade FURminator proved to be helpful with Rocky because I can capture twice the hair with each stroke.

Trip (shown in the photo above) is a formerly feral cat who still has the soul of a wild child, and he’s not always convinced that my grooming him is a good thing. Sometimes he glares at me with a look that cries, “Why are you stealing my furs?” He starts each session well, cranks up his purr-o-meter, appears to be lovin’ it, but half the time will get bitey a few minutes into the session. He tips the scale at 20 lbs. and sports needle-sharp teeth, so I’m not inclined to argue with him.

Since he’s young, he grooms himself more aggressively than my other cats, thus he tends to ingest a lot more cat hair, which translates into more hair balls. So he needs more FURmination.

As with Rocky, the double-blade FURminator grabs twice the hair with every stroke, so that even though many of his grooming sessions are short, they’re twice as effective. It’s a win.

The FURminator FURejector deShedding Tool
This FURminator has an ejector blade that self-cleans when depressed, making grooming faster and easier. This is handy; I really liked the feature. It’s an excellent solution if you have squirmy cats and need a hand free to hold them in place during a grooming session.

SUMMARY
Both are exceptional grooming tools. The pile of cat hair shown in top photo resulted from just one FURmination session with three of my cats.


The Double Edge FURminator cuts grooming time in half, very helpful if your cats don’t tolerate grooming very well, or if you want to get the most bang out of each minute spent grooming. The FURminator FURejector is especially handy if you can benefit from one-handed grooming, as you might when dealing with energetic, squirming cats. I eagerly await a double edge version of the FURejector.


WHAT WILL YOU DO WITH ALL THAT FUR?
Here are some suggestions:

  • It’s a great material for birds to use as nesting material. Put the fur in a clean wire mesh suet container or mesh bag and hang it in a tree in the Spring and early summer.
  • Make your cat a wig.
  • Make a cat hair handbag.
  • Make a felted animal figure representing your cat.