GO!

When the time comes, what do I do??

Whether a cat dies, is lost or stolen, or must be placed in a new home, this is the place to gather together to give and receive love and support when you experience the loss of a beloved cat.

  
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Oscar-Teachi- ng Angels to- Love

With mom from- Oct '97 - Aug '09
 
 
Purred: Sun Jul 26, '09 11:16am PST 
Little Oscar is suffering from liver disease. He has been losing weight, he still eats OK, and today I noticed his skin is beginning to turn yellow. So one of these days it may be time.

If I find him one day gone, or he seems too sick to go on and I have to help him, what do I do?

We went to one nearby vet but he isn't good and I don't want to go back there. I don't yet know what to do with the body. How much is this all going to cost?

Thanks.
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Oscar-Teachi- ng Angels to- Love

With mom from- Oct '97 - Aug '09
 
 
Purred: Mon Jul 27, '09 8:10pm PST 
ooook I'll keep looking.
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Tully

The Tullster
 
 
Purred: Mon Jul 27, '09 9:17pm PST 
We are so sorry to hear that Little Oscar's health is failing. If Oscar should pass away while he is at home, there are places you can take your pet's body to, depending on how you would like to handle the remains.

Our Mom's previous kitty, Carlos, passed away from lymphoma last fall and died at home. It was very sad to say the least since he died very quickly and it was not expected that he would pass at home. He had been to the vet's the previous night for hydration and antibiotics so it wasn't expected that he would take such a turn for the worse that very night. She and Daddy found a place on-line nearby that cremates pets and they put his ashes in a beautiful urn with his picture on it. Mommy keeps it on her dresser.

If Oscar should get to the point where he cannot eat, walk, or seems like he is in pain or uncomfortable, we would take him to a vet to see if it is time to euthanize him.

We know how very painful it is to see a beloved pet in failing health and we hope that Oscar stays as comfortable as possible in the days he has left. Big hugs to you hug
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Aragorn (In- Memory)

One Cool Cat

moderator
 
 
Purred: Mon Jul 27, '09 10:01pm PST 
I did a search for Groups in Ohio and came up with quite a few:

Ohio Groups

You could check out the list for groups closest to your town and join the group or contact some of the members to tell them your situation, looking for a vet. If Oscar quits eating, most likely you will have to make the decision to have a vet help him to the Rainbow Bridge, as you don't want Oscar to suffer. There are various prices vets charge for that.

Another cost depends on what you want to do after Oscar passes. Leaving a pet's body for the vet to dispose of is the least expensive. Cremation, with the ashes placed in a plastic container, returned to you costs more. Ordering a specific urn for the pet's ashes for you to keep can range anywhere from $40 to "the sky's the limit".

Purring for Oscar and you.
hug

Oscar-Teachi- ng Angels to- Love

With mom from- Oct '97 - Aug '09
 
 
Purred: Fri Jul 31, '09 9:24pm PST 
Thanks guys. I'll have to think about the vet thing because I don't want to take him to the one awful place I took him to in town. The only other place I've taken him to around here is a holistic vet about a 1/2 hour away.

The thought of having an urn here at home seems pretty depressing and dark, but yet I hate to just hand him over to strangers, too. What a difficult decision.
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Emma (in- memory)

63543
 
 
Purred: Sun Aug 2, '09 6:34am PST 
If you have a back yard maybe you can bury him. I know most places won't "let" you. A cat is small and you can bury him close to a tree away from utilities .(Emma is buried in my grandmas back yard.) If the kitty is cremated, you can bury him or let his remains out just about anywhere. Maybe in your garden?
We are purring for you.
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Oscar-Teachi- ng Angels to- Love

With mom from- Oct '97 - Aug '09
 
 
Purred: Sun Aug 2, '09 10:22am PST 
We do have a back yard, but we rent so I don't want to leave him here. I'm thinking I might cremate him and keep the ashes but I don't know! I think at first it will be very painful to see the remains around the house, but after the years pass it might be more comforting.
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Tully

The Tullster
 
 
Purred: Sun Aug 2, '09 11:41am PST 
When Mom and Dad first picked up the urn with Carlos' ashes, it was very painful and Mom cried practically every day when she looked at it. There is a beautiful picture of Carlos on the urn, and now it gives her great comfort to know his remains will always be with her. If she moves to another house, she can take the ashes with her.

It is personal preference, and I'm sure you will decide what is right for you and Oscar.
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Aragorn (In- Memory)

One Cool Cat

moderator
 
 
Purred: Sun Aug 2, '09 7:27pm PST 
Some people scatter their pet's ashes -- an open prairie -- a pretty area in the forest preserve -- over a lake or a private place that has a special meaning for you.

Beatrice- (Miss You!- '94-'12)

The very Beast- of all

moderator
 
 
Purred: Sun Aug 2, '09 10:55pm PST 
Mom had Arthur's ashes returned. The place that performed the cremation returned them in a metal box which was placed inside a silver bag. For now, the bag is in the cloth basket where Arthur loved to nap. cry

We're not going to get an urn because mom doesn't intend to keep the ashes forever. She thinks they'll eventually be scattered or maybe she'll bury the box, probably near where we all first lived together in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan.

Our vet helped Arthur to cross over. That cost about $60. The vet clinic uses an outside service for cremation, and to have that done and the ashes returned was $180.

Purrs for you, sweet Oscar, and hugs to your human!
hug

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