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Behavior & Training > Unprovoked, without warning Vicious attacks while petting.

Simon

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Purred: Tue Feb 5, '13 7:10pm PST 
It may still be over stimulation. She comes up and initially wants contact, you stop when you notice she puts on her crazy face, which by then may be too late. Try stopping the affection while she is still in lovely dovey mode and see what happens. Sometimes it only takes one pet too many for a cat to decide they've had enough so by stopping before you've reached that point and leaving her wanting more it should (hopefully) just eradicate that behavior all together.

I know what it's like to be unemployed and worried about fur-baby health so I feel your pain! Vet bills are never cheap!! Hang in there, I'd try the "I'll only touch you a little bit" method and see if that works at all, if not then I would put it down to medical issues and have her tested. I hope it's not a brain tumor!
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» There has since been 11 posts. Last posting by Julian, Dec 15 2:45 am

Behavior & Training > Unprovoked, without warning Vicious attacks while petting.
Simon

I'm awesome? I- know! ^w^
 
 
Purred: Tue Feb 5, '13 11:37am PST 
Over Stimulation and Excitement Aggression

"An often perplexing case history involves a cat that one moment lies peacefully purring on the owner's lap, happily accepting affection; and the next moment, erupts into a rage of claws and teeth. The owner is shocked by the sudden attack. It's actually normal behavior for cats to have quick reversals of mood and behavior. There's a fine line between enjoyable petting and irritating handling. Once the petting reaches a certain threshold, the cat will reject any further touching. The cat says, "Stop it!" by biting or scratching. Perhaps a sensitive or painful area was unknowingly touched. Continuous pleasurable stimulation can overexcite the cat causing aggressive behavior. The cat becomes sexually excited and the resulting aggression is a part of normal sexual behavior." (Taken from http://www.perfectpaws.com/agg.html )

I wonder if you stopped petting her, just get up and walk away from her, before she attacked if she would eventually stop this behavior? What you describe sounds a lot like she is being overstimulated though if she is spayed I'm not sure if the 'sexually excited' portion would apply or not.
It would be beneficial to have her in to the vet for blood tests just to check that there isn't anything else going on. I'm assuming also that this is a recent problem and that she has been good over the last 8 years. Has anything in your household changed lately? Have you or other house members been stressed out at all?
I would keep a blanket handy so when she starts to go into attack mode you can safely pick her up and get her off the couch, though the slipper seemed to work OK lol, quick thinking!

Hope that helped some, keep us posted! I'm curious to see what other members suggest as well.

~Simon and Hunter
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» There has since been 13 posts. Last posting by Julian, Dec 15 2:45 am


Behavior & Training > Got A Haircut Now I Wont Poop In Litter

Simon

I'm awesome? I- know! ^w^
 
 
Purred: Mon Feb 4, '13 9:10pm PST 
Day 3 of Simon's new shave down. Yesterday and the day before I noticed one of the cats has pooped just outside of the litter box. I'm not 100% sure which cat is doing this but I highly suspect it was my 6 year old DLH Simon because it started the same day he got his new fancy shave.
If it is Simon I'm confused as to why, he seems to LOVE his new haircut, he's been a ton more active and affectionate. Even going as far as playing regularly with my younger cat Hunter. Is it possible that being shaved has somehow messed up his great litter skills?

Back story here: I have not changed the litter brand, or added any new deodorizer to it. It has not changed locations at all either. I have 2 boxes, both covered and in the entry way, they are fairly close together as I don't have sufficient space to separate them any further but this has never been a problem before. The poop never appears in the morning, only after I've gone to work and returned home.
Both cats have been checked by a vet and had blood screens done within the last month and are both healthy. The only thing that has changed since the pooping has started has been the shave on Simon (first poop found the same day), the cats no longer sleep in my bedroom (they have the whole main level of the house now, it had been that way for a week before the pooping started) and I dewormed everyone.

After I cleaned up the mess I deodorized the area and moved the one box a few inches to cover the original spot and the next night when I returned home from work I noticed that the chosen area for soiling had switched also. I removed the cover on one of the boxes hoping that would correct this problem, I'll find out tonight if it worked.

I'm a bit distressed by this recent litter mishap, if anyone has experienced similar problems I'd love to hear the why's and how's of it all. I love my cats but I do not love them soiling on my carpet!
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by , Feb 4 9:10 pm


Grooming > Hairballs Ick! Vaseline Recommended?

Simon

I'm awesome? I- know! ^w^
 
 
Purred: Mon Jan 28, '13 7:18pm PST 
I have had my Hunter-cat almost a year now and he has never spat up a hairball. My newest kitty addition however is a different story.
I'm new to being a cat mom so when I came home from work and saw the hairball behind the couch I panicked and assumed it was feces. I couldn't for the life of me figure out why all of a sudden someone was pooping behind my couch! The other day I was in bed and woke up to Simon horking up a lovely mess of food/hair only to finally clue in that what I had found behind my couch was from the other end of the cat. Simon is a 6 year old DLH with feline asthma (I dont know if that matters but the more info the better) and has had 2 hairballs in the last month.
A friend of mine from work told me that her cat Ringo had terrible problems with hairballs and her vet suggested a little bit of Vaseline every so often would help him pass them. I'm not 100% sure if I should be letting him eat Vaseline though, seems kind of iffy to me. I broke down and bought a jar of it but have had it sitting on my counter for about 3 weeks. I would rather keep him shaved down if the Vaseline is bad for him but I really enjoy his long, silky fur and it would be kind of sad to clip him short.

Has anyone used Vaseline for hairballs? If so how much should I be giving?

Thanks in advance for your replies! cat on moon
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by , Jan 28 7:18 pm


Behavior & Training > How can I get my cat to use his new cat bed?

Simon

I'm awesome? I- know! ^w^
 
 
Purred: Sun Jan 20, '13 8:41pm PST 
Catnip is a magical thing! Along with the hot water bottle I would add a used pillowcase from one of your pillows so it smells like you guys, depending on how old he is he might just be missing all his siblings and finding it hard to adjust to having his own bed. A ticking alarm clock placed by the bed will simulate heartbeats and relax him.
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» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by Tia, Feb 6 3:51 pm

Cat Health > Asthmatic Cat- Alternive to inhaler while we go on vacation?
Simon

I'm awesome? I- know! ^w^
 
 
Purred: Wed Jan 2, '13 6:40pm PST 
My kitty Simon has asthma as well, though I give him pills and not the inhaler. He was diagnosed Dec 18th 2012 and the one time I left home for a few days I took him with me lol. Would it be possible to leave him in one room where he cannot escape or hide good enough he cannot be found and have a friend come and give him his medication or does he get too aggressive to handle? I know the vets here will let you board/kennel your pet there and they will give him his meds but depending on where you go it can get kinda pricey.

Good luck!
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» There has since been 8 posts. Last posting by Charlie, Jan 24 9:53 pm


Behavior & Training > Pet Ease/Feliway Diffuser for a scaredy cat?

Simon

I'm awesome? I- know! ^w^
 
 
Purred: Sun Dec 30, '12 4:56pm PST 
I just finished reading a book on cat behavior and the author uses Feliway a lot in her book. She recommends that you get the spray and put some on the shoes/feet and cuffs of pants of new people (or your parents lol) and have them just ignore the cat completely. It can be kind of scary for a cat to have people trying to pet him/her if they arent comfortable with that level of contact yet. Cats absolutely LOVE my dad, who isnt a cat fan in the least, because he doesn't try to force interactions with them.
I don't understand why people have animals if they aren't willing to do the work, let alone mistreat them. I think Jude knows that you took him from that place and provide him with great care and love. Try getting your parents to do the feeding and watering so he can build a bond with them without them handling him directly. Food goes a long way when it comes to trust.
As for everyday noises like doors banging closed or chairs scraping against the floor I would start exposing him to the noises, I'm new to cats but there are some techniques that work wonderfully with very shy dogs that may be helpful. Audio recordings can get the cat (or dog) used to the sounds that startle him but can be monitored and controlled according to how fast your kitty is comfortable with being exposed to things. Record (or download) noises that he is sensitive to and leave a CD playing for him when he's in a calm and relaxed state. Start out with the CD playing very quietly and slowly increase the volume as he gets more comfortable. As he gets less and less fearful try actually making some of these noises.
You can also try getting your parents to move at a slower pace without looking at him and make sure not to coddle him when he's in a fearful state. If he's nervous or shy and you pet and praise him it just enforces the behavior of hiding as the right thing to do.
My cat Simon used to run and hide when I got up every time and just with me ignoring him he became more comfortable because he wasn't worried I was going to try and touch him. As he got more and more comfortable we would have 'cat chats' to get him used to being addressed directly. I would tell him about the weather or what I needed for groceries that week. Feliway (or any calming diffuser) placed in high traffic areas would be very beneficial I think. As soon as I get a day off I'm planning to pick some up for Simon (I just found where they sell it after a few phone calls!) so I'll keep you posted on how it's working out with him!

Hope you and Jude work things out! Keep us updated on your progress and good luck smile

~Tara
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Felix, Jan 2 2:31 pm


Cat Health > Feline Asthma

Simon

I'm awesome? I- know! ^w^
 
 
Purred: Sat Dec 29, '12 9:05pm PST 
Thank you Sammie and Merlin for your responses!

@ Sammie> We're on one pill every second day for another week and a half then I switch to one pill every 3 days and see how that goes. I still get kinda wheezy but mom thinks that it's the carpet, it's old carpet that she really, really wants to rip out as soon as she gets enough money to do it!

@Merlin> My vet didn't suggest an inhaler, I'm kind of glad though because I don't know how I would take to that, I'm usually a good boy and take my pill really well, though she smooshes my whiskers when she opens my mouth. frown

kitty Thanks again guys!
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by , Dec 29 9:05 pm


Cat Health > Feline Asthma

Simon

I'm awesome? I- know! ^w^
 
 
Purred: Thu Dec 20, '12 11:44pm PST 
What is Feline Asthma?
Asthma in cats is a chronic inflammation of the small passageways of the lungs (bronchioles). When your pet has asthma, these passages thicken, and collapse when the cat inhales, making it difficult for the pet to catch its breath. All degrees of asthma exist. In severe cases, coughing, wheezing and exercise intolerance occur. In these cases, large numbers of bronchioles plug up with mucus and the smooth muscle that surrounds these tubes go into spasm, restricting breathing. Other cats have only a mild cough or high-pitched wheeze that comes and goes. It is estimated that one percent of all cats suffer from asthma. The incidence of the disease is highest in Siamese cats.

The chronic bronchitis of feline asthma usually first occurs between the ages of two and six. It starts as a slight cough and mild respiratory distress interspersed with long periods during which your pet appears normal. These early signs are often overlooked or are mistaken for hair balls.

Cats in the midst of an acute asthma attack have very hard time breathing. They assume a praying position and concentrate on obtaining the air they need in deliberate breaths. These breaths are deep, labored and abdominal. Sometimes they will vomit. A severe asthma attack can be life threatening.
(http://www.2ndchance.info/asthmacat.htm)

I got my new fur-child, Simon, 7 days ago and on day 2 I noticed he wheezed a lot. The poor little guy just seemed like he was working way harder than he should have been to breathe. I asked a co-worker who had known him in his previous home and she told me he's been wheezing for years. I called the vet and made an appointment, which was last Tuesday, and he had to get an X-ray done of his chest to see what was going on. The vet diagnosed him with Feline asthma and prescribed him Prednisone, which is a steroid. I should learn not to google thins though because the side effects kind of scare me. He seems to be doing really well on them though, it's day 3 of his pills and I can already notice a difference in his breathing.
For the first 7 days he takes one everyday, then 2 weeks on every second day, and after that every three days he gets one.

Has anyone dealt with Feline Asthma?
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» There has since been 3 posts. Last posting by , Dec 29 9:05 pm

Cat Health > Do you collar your indoor cat?
Simon

I'm awesome? I- know! ^w^
 
 
Purred: Thu Dec 20, '12 11:33pm PST 
Both of my house cats wear collars with ID tags in the house. I have room mates and all 3 dogs (my two dogs wear collars with ID tags in the house but my room mates dog doesn't wear one ever)go in and out to pee so the door gets opened a lot. My new cat Simon used to be an outdoor/indoor cat so he still tries to sneak out there and I'd rather he have his ID on him if he does get out. My 2 dogs are both micro-chipped but my cats are not. I don't worry that they will get caught up in the house because all collars are the right size and fit correctly, plus I don't have any hazards in the house they can get caught on lol.
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» There has since been 18 posts. Last posting by , Jan 25 1:46 pm

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