Postings by Paul Hewson of ExaltedCat

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Cat Health > Please help cat with neuro/possible FIP
Paul Hewson- of- ExaltedCat

Z Paulie Kitteh
 
 
Purred: Thu Apr 28, '11 12:13am PST 
For a viral infection that's been identified for almost 100 years, so little is known about FIP. Fortunately, the Winn Feline Foundation has been and continues to fund research and more has been discovered in the past 10 years than the previous 90 or so. In a nut shell, the intestinal corona virus is allowed to mutate BY SOME INDIVIDUALS. Once the mutation has occurred, each cat's body handles the virus in its own unique way which explains the incredible variation among symptoms. (Some research indicates that each mutated virus is unique.) I suspect that FIP is way under-diagnosed for this reason. The mutant FCoV, known now as the FIP virus--even though it's indicated that the virus may no longer be contagious at this stage and doesn't always involve the peritoneum--attacks and enters the macrophages, a type of white blood cell and an important part of the immune response. Therefore, in order to fight the virus, the cat's immune system must attack itself.

Neurological symptoms are commonly associated with non-effusive FIP. I suspect it's because some of the viruses have entered the meninges. In addition, I also wonder if many cats who have been diagnosed with cerebellar hypoplasia aren't FIP positive but maintaining. Dwarfism is also commonly associated with FIP. Steroidal treatment has mixed reviews as it suppresses the immune system. Hopefully some viable treatments will be discovered soon for this horrible disease.

I'm so sorry that Stitch had to leave you so soon but know that you gave her every possible chance to fight this formidable disease. For all who have been touched by FIP, please consider making a donation to the Winn Feline Foundation so that more research can be done.
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» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by Max, May 9 8:21 pm

Raw Food Diet > Less human allergies around raw fed cat?
Paul Hewson- of- ExaltedCat

Z Paulie Kitteh
 
 
Purred: Mon Jan 24, '11 11:09am PST 
Ooohh, your comments and observations are fascinating to me. I have been researching systemic yeast infections and diet for some years now. In fact, dandruff is often the result of a yeast infection, usually considered topical, though I suspect otherwise. I believe that many of the maladies suffered by humans and companion animals may be caused by a systemic yeast infection fed by and creating an insatiable craving for simple carbohydrates by competing with the brain and other organs for glucose, eventually resulting in thyroid "burn-out". A healthy body is pretty efficient at keeping things under control--once an equilibrium is established--through the waste removal systems and it's usually in those locations where yeast infections are commonly diagnosed. Actually, they all share one common denominator: skin (or mucus membranes). So a body eliminating yeast will NEED to shed more skin and hair. When the skin becomes overwhelmed, symptoms develop that are generally associated with an "overactive immune system", as well as "fat deposits", tumors, moles, etc. So I deduct that because you are feeding raw, you are not feeding the yeast and there's less need for the elimination process.

Interestingly, I've found that I am more reactive to animals I suspect have a heavy yeast infection. That may explain why some people have allergic reactions to some animals and not others. Of course, for those who have less reaction to longer-haired animals, maybe they also hold in the dander more. Either way, I have found that my allergy symptoms have subsided as I have attempted to eliminate and treat my own systemic yeast infection. It's amazing to be able to inhale the fragrances of Spring through a clear nose and without repercussions! big grin
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Paul Hewson of ExaltedCat, Jan 24 11:09 am


Raw Food Diet > Always Hungry....

Paul Hewson- of- ExaltedCat

Z Paulie Kitteh
 
 
Purred: Sun Jan 23, '11 10:23pm PST 
Carbs are apparently addictive so, if you've switched from dry, the cats that still act starved may just be going through junk food withdrawals. Some of our gang did overeat their raw food in the beginning but, just as they learn HOW to eat raw, they also learn how MUCH to eat. Some may be a bit more gluttonous, however, and throw up the excess. Generally speaking, I don't think a cat fed a proper raw diet will get fat, though most of our raw fed Ragdolls do have their characteristic "enlarged fat pad". big grin

We have seen that if the cats aren't allowed the opportunity to gnaw on their bones, they are not as satisfied, even if they consume the same volume of food, and will stampede to the kitchen any time a "food noise" is made. In addition, Pumokin may need to eat more frequently...kittens' metabolisms are much faster than an adult cat's.
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Paul Hewson of ExaltedCat, Jan 23 10:23 pm


Raw Food Diet > Giving up

Paul Hewson- of- ExaltedCat

Z Paulie Kitteh
 
 
Purred: Sun Jan 23, '11 10:00pm PST 
BRAVO Basics is made of raw ground "chicken frames and bones". That might help get her through. We've also found that some of our cats prefer a quieter dining area away from the other rowdy little carnivores. There are days when some skip a meal if they ate really well the meal before too.
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Princess , Jan 29 11:19 am


Raw Food Diet > Texture of The Honest Kitchen Prowl?

Paul Hewson- of- ExaltedCat

Z Paulie Kitteh
 
 
Purred: Sun Jan 23, '11 9:52pm PST 
I believe it's probably supposed to resemble canned food more than soup but whatever works for the kitty! I'm disappointed to see potatoes in the ingredient list as I believe starches to be a filler with potentially negative consequences, making the formulation no different to a super-premium dry food with water added. Hopefully she'll transition to a balanced BARF diet soon!
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Paul Hewson of ExaltedCat, Jan 23 9:52 pm

Raw Food Diet > 20yr old cat on raw?
Paul Hewson- of- ExaltedCat

Z Paulie Kitteh
 
 
Purred: Sun Jan 23, '11 9:40pm PST 
My old kitty-man, Haynes, who left us at the age of 19 1/2, would have LOVED the raw diet we're feeding now. I wouldn't hesitate to offer raw to your kitty, just make sure she's eating enough. Assuming her teeth are in great shape, she probably lacks the jaw strength necessary to properly eat a BARF diet immediately. We started out kittens out on raw pretty early but had to cut the meat into small pieces that we gradually enlarged and it wasn't long before they were gnoshing on whole pieces with supplements of organ meat and some veggies. As with all dietary changes, I'd suggest starting slowly since there could be some digestive upset, which is more problematic in a senior than a young adult. I have tried Nature's Variety and BRAVO and like both but prefer BARF for the dental benefits derived from the whole bones. Our cats relish their bones and get such satisfaction from chewing on them at length. Gotta watch the dogs or they'll sneak in a grab the bones but they do get the leftovers. wink
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Paul Hewson of ExaltedCat, Jan 23 9:40 pm


Cat Health > Sicker than ever

Paul Hewson- of- ExaltedCat

Z Paulie Kitteh
 
 
Purred: Fri Feb 12, '10 7:46am PST 
I have been doing much research into systemic yeast infections in both people and animals. I have studied several animals with similar symptoms, three of which are or were my own. Others with whom I was involved in basic care on a routine basis. Our cat and very small dog have both had an alteration in body shape...as if the spine is rising, causing then to appear "ribby" without weight change. The visible bumps generally appear seasonally, winter and spring, and are, I believe, dead candida that the body is eliminating. Unfortunately, since many intestinal systems have been wiped out, some repeatedly, by antibiotics without repopulation of the good gut bacteria, the normally resident but pathenogenic candida is allowed a good foothold then fed carbohydrates that are undigestible to the cat or dog but easily converted to simple sugars to feed the candida. So, for starters, the most immediately contollable variable is to eliminate all-or as many as possible- carbohydrates from the diet and supplement with a good pre- and pro0biotic supplement. The addition of defrosted or lightly cooked green beans and green peas may assist with the removal of stagnant waste. Some cats love 'em, some not. If they'll start playing with them, there's hope. Paulie likes to toss green beans in the air before devouring them; watches the others eat peas but can't quite figure out why yet. smile Often the candida perforates the intestines, allowing for the leakage of waste, which the body must eliminate in the most efficient way possible so, depending on its location, it may be encapsulated and pushed as far to the surface as possible (possibly exhibiting as a fatty cyst or tumor) or, in the case of a more widespread infection, as multiple small bumps. As stated in a previous post, many times animals with allergies have yeasty ears, which can be explained in most dogs by their floppy ears. However, many cats are diagnosed with recurrent yeast infections in their ears but no one is questioning WHY when their ears allow for more than adequate air flow to prevent them from being the ideal "warm, moist environment" on the outside. Logically, that would imply the infection is coming from within.

All of this will help and may eventually eliminate the systemic infection but the scales are so far tipped already, that something else to treat the candida specifically will expediate the process. In addition to the above, I have been using OxE Drops with success but it's a LONG road and marked improvement may be slow to come. I have been surprised to discover that the animals that suffer from the itchies seem to really appreciate a good scrubbing with a stiff-bristled brush to help exfoliate those bumps, which is why they chew and scratch. Start slowly since it'll probably be a new experience for Tigger but gradually offer a more vigorous stroke to see if she's receptive. Some topical olive oil may look funny for a day or two but seems to help. If ears are a problem area too, add a few drops there too.

Hope this helps get Tigger and her person feeling better!
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Paul Hewson of ExaltedCat, Feb 12 7:46 am


Cat Health > Need Prayers Please

Paul Hewson- of- ExaltedCat

Z Paulie Kitteh
 
 
Purred: Fri Feb 12, '10 6:58am PST 
Hey there,

We're all so glad to hear that Maggie is showing some good improvement after her odd neuro incident. Just a few thoughts to add to the great suggestions and ideas you've already received.

Have you considered consulting a chiropractor? Depending on the laws in your area, there may be some who specialize in critters. Otherwise, many human DCs will also treat animals. I once referred a client of the veterinary office in which I worked as a tech to one when cortisone didn't completely resolve a similar issue in a dog and she was considering euthanasia. The dog made a full recovery after only a few inexpensive adjustments. It's great that the prednisone has helped reduce the inflammation and subsequently the symptoms and possibly the entire issue; however, if you don't see a full recovery, I think a good animal-loving chiroprtactor could help Maggie May.

The curling under of her paw is common with neurological injury and often the last thing to return. She may have had a previous injury or weakness not apparent on palpation as it's unlikely a "mis-jump" to cause such severe symptoms. Cats are just so darn flexible, a trait we should all aim to emulate for our own benefit!

As for expressing her bladder being painful, if not done with excessive force of course, in an incapacitated animal, it's more like assistance with the release of uncomfortable pressure (assuming the nerve issue isn't actually preventing her from feeling that her bladder is full). I recently provided hospice care for my cat, Haynes, who was having similar issues passing urine and stool. When he still had the strength to push the urine and stool from his bladder and bowel, I would periodically place him in the box and gently massage his abdomen which was enough to stimulate him to go. As his muscles atrophied, he was no longer able to do this so I had to simulate the action of his muscles to assist with the start and finish of his urination (the latter in an attempt to hopefully flush as much of the potential sludge as he had been diagnosed with Chronic Renal Failure four or so years before), but he assisted by handling the in-between time. Basically, after 19 1/2 years, he quickly caught on to that little routine, which is similar to "letting the dogs out". In other words, more time consuming than dealing with a "regular" cat's elimination needs but manageable if desired.

Try feeding her green beans, green peas, or pumpkin. Baby food's fine ifor now if she won't eat the whole defrosted or lightly cooked ones right away, but keep offering them by themselves first then with quality canned food if necessary. Sometimes it takes them a while to warm up to them. They're all really good for getting in some extra water as well as fiber. Personally, I think they benefit from the cholorphyll too. That's lacking in most commercial foods; basically cats were created and have evolved quite nicely eating birds, mice, and rabbits in their entirety, which includes the digest of a small herbivore or omnivore that eats it's natural diet. Many foods contain poultry digest, from chickens who eat other chickens, or tripe, which is beefo digest. That comes from an animal with a four-chambered stomach who has most efficiently extracted every nutrient from the contents thereof. (That's why cow poop is black.) Oh, and add a few drops of olive oil to each meal.

Carrying Maggie around with you will be helpful to her. Immobility on the outside leads to immobility on the inside. Haynes was not particularly fond of being held but, as he aged, he sought it more and more, finally reaching the point he would literally jump up, from the floor, into our arms...when we weren't looking, it was sometimes challenging to catch him! In his last years, that became an insistent pawing request to be draped over my arm or shoulder when moving and my lap when still. When he was no longer able to move on his own, the last week, we had his first constipation episode I recalled that I hadn't had him out as much since he was recovering from a sinus abscess and didn't feel much like moving. Through it all, he didn't throw up or lose his appetite until the day he died. Such a strong heart that ultimately did beat just for me. I started to get him out and carry him some and found that each time, he would suddenly start meowing then empty his bladder. Gravity works! Luckily I learned quickly to wrap him in a towel. A gently circular massage with a flat hand as well as some deeper abdominal massage would probably feel good to her and may be helpful in stimulating lymph and blood circulation.

It's been a while since there's been a post about you. Sure hope you're continuing to improve and would love to hear!
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» There has since been 10 posts. Last posting by 13calicos, Feb 18 4:40 pm


Cat Health > me-OWch :o(

Paul Hewson- of- ExaltedCat

Z Paulie Kitteh
 
 
Purred: Fri Feb 12, '10 5:49am PST 
Lucky,

I'm so glad you've made your way to a caring human who's very worried about you. It does sound like you're very sick but without some more information, it's difficult to even speculate what may be wrong with you but parasites or a virus are two likely causes. Since you're already so debilitated, a fecal to determing what type of parasite you may have and treatment with a parasite-specific dewormer is probably better than just using an general dewormer. Your person is doing the right thing, trying to keep you warm. A heating pad would be great, if not then a direct light. If she doesn't have a clamp on light, a lamp next to you would be helpful. The bulb must be incandescent (flourescent ones don't offer much heat) and as high in wattage as the fixture will allow. You probably won't feel much like eating until she's able to figure out why you're throwing up. She could try some plain Karo syrup, just a few drops on your tongue, to help provide you some energy until you can get to see the vet.

Best wishes to you and your sweet human,

Z Paulie Kitteh
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Paul Hewson of ExaltedCat, Feb 12 5:49 am

Raw Food Diet > My first time getting called \"evil.\"
Paul Hewson- of- ExaltedCat

Z Paulie Kitteh
 
 
Purred: Sat Feb 6, '10 3:59pm PST 
One of Paulie's vets and I were discussing commercial diets recently and he said the ideal meal would be blended mice. Of course, they don't have to be blended but many people are so far removed from their own food sources and are averse to associating hamburger with an actual cow so I'm not surprised that many can't embrace the concept of feeding companion animals what nature has designed them to eat. Of course, those same people fail to realize that feeding things that nature didn't intend resulted in Mad Cow Disease. I am not currently feeding live raw but am considering it. After reading through these posts, it just occured to me that we could actually raise our own cat food since we have chickens...but I don't eat chicken, beef, pork, or lamb and seeing meat pretty much turns my stomach PLUS feeding MY babies to my other babies is really counter to any of my previous actions regarding any chicks we have hatched (like saving them rather than killing them). So it looks like that will have to be a back-up plan should it ever be required and I'll have to go buy some chicks that aren't part of the family!thinking Where do you get your chicks and mice? And are they live, refrigerated, or frozen?
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» There has since been 27 posts. Last posting by Aura, Feb 25 1:16 pm

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