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Do intact males always spray?

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Remulos

Saber-toothed- House Cat
 
 
Purred: Tue Mar 15, '11 11:53am PST 
Remy was neutered at 6 months so that's not why I'm asking. I'm just curious.

Do indoor intact male cats always spray or is it just more likely than with a neutered male? I understand spraying isn't the only reason to neuter (pet overpopulation, health reasons, roaming, fighting, ect.) but I'm just curious about the spraying. Are there ways to prevent/discourage a male from spaying short of castration?
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Abbi

Chunk
 
 
Purred: Tue Mar 15, '11 12:51pm PST 
I have always found that entire toms spray a lot. The stray that we feed comes in sometimes and sprays round the litter trays.
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Penn & Teller

Masters of The- Multiverse
 
 
Purred: Tue Mar 15, '11 1:54pm PST 
Some guy at Pets Mart said moth balls. Worth a shot?
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BooBoo

headed for the- light.
 
 
Purred: Tue Mar 15, '11 9:44pm PST 
When there are toms in a cattery, most spray, some don't. These are cats kept in just about exactlyy the same conditions, so I'd say it just varies from cat to cat. You can maybe use mothballs or whatever to keep a cat away, but a sprayer is probably going to just go somewhee else to do it. It's best to neuter before they ever stop if they already have the habit, neutering doesn't always help.
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Miss Edith

Oh rly foo?
 
 
Purred: Wed Mar 16, '11 6:58am PST 
Some say if you neuter before kitty puberty (age 5 months or so it depends on kitten) they won't do it. If you do it after, they will still do it from time to time when presented with territorial issues but rarely. If you wait longer, with each passing year or month depending, the kitty will be more apt to spray after neutering because old habits die hard. It's a behavioral/territorial act. We have an 18 yr old dude at my neighbor's house right now and all I can think of is he was neutered late in life because he sprays EVERYTHING haha. My porch stinks the high heavens because if he comes over on good food day and tries to eat my porch cat's food they get into spray wars. Both cats are neutered. I think sometimes even cats that never spray will spray when the super spray happy cats start trying to mark all of their stuff.

I dunno! Just my theories on them cat affairs!
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Umesaburo

I'm a stud!
 
 
Purred: Thu Mar 17, '11 5:03am PST 
As BooBoo says, not always. I have one stud in my cattery (Umesaburo, who is intact, natch), and he doesn't spray. He was my breeder's stud, and didn't spray when he was there, either. However, he's never lived with another stud, or a cat who does spray. He might start spraying if I get another stud, but maybe not. A breeder friend of mine who has several studs says she uses "mind control" to keep her boys from spraying. (She tells them that they'll have to go back to their cages if they spray.) It may depend to a degree on breed, but some Maine Coons are real sprayers. It might also depend on a cat’s background. Spike marks clothing left on the floor, although that could be more of a complaint that the toilets are dirty than anything else. He was a rescued feral, so he may be more territorial than cattery cats. Catteries, obviously, must keep their intact males and females separate, but the intact boys are often kept in a separate room or outbuilding, and/or in cages, in order to contain the odor. This is one aspect of breeding that I’m not fond of. A stud’s career can be as long as five years, and it can be a lonely five years if they are caged and isolated. Some people use diapers or stud pants for their intact males. As for hormonal or other treatments to keep an intact male from spraying, I haven’t heard of those. I have heard of “teaser toms,” who are males who have not been castrated but have had vasectomies. They are capable of mating with sexually frustrated females but not of impregnating them. I have also heard of using hormones to regulate the heat cycles of intact cattery queens, but don’t know of anyone who resorts to this. Umesaburo sees and smells the intact females, and shows no evidence of sexual interest in them. He may have a weak libido.
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Kosco - 4/97 ~- 8/5/07

Sweet Memories
 
 
Purred: Thu Mar 17, '11 11:54am PST 
I used to have an indoor/outdoor male unneutered cat that never sprayed in my house. He was an awesome cat, did all his business outside, and was very clean.
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Remulos

Saber-toothed- House Cat
 
 
Purred: Thu Mar 17, '11 11:27pm PST 
Thanks for all the responses! I probably won't ever keep an intact kitty but it's always interesting to learn new things about cats kitty
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Umesaburo

I'm a stud!
 
 
Purred: Fri Mar 18, '11 4:55am PST 
Yeah, I can't see the point of having an intact cat unless you're a breeder. They say that neutered males, in general, are the most affectionate of all cats. Right now, I need a stud to service the three of my queens who are Umesaburo's daughters, but before I buy one (I'm dilly dallying over color), I'm going to get stud service from my mentor's cat, who is, apparently, a big sprayer. She's offered to sell him to me, but...
thinking
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Hawkeye- (Rainbow- Bridge)

Yeah,- Whatever....
 
 
Purred: Fri Mar 18, '11 7:43am PST 
I'd rethink the mothballs. Our vet warned us about mothballs when we asked about keeping kitty cat out of the house plants. Mothballs are poison. Some cats will play and lick on them. Other cats will even eat them.shock. Mothballs are also dangerous to dogs and wild critters.

We have chicken wire down in places in the yard and so far that is working.
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