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Bones or no bones?

This is a dedicated place for all of your questions and answers about Raw Diets. There are also some really cool groups like "Raw Fed" on the topic you can join. This forum is for people who already know they like the raw diet or sincerely want to learn more. Please remember that you are receiving advice from peers and not professionals. If you have specific health-related questions about your cat's diet, please contact your vet!

  
Patricia

The Old Lady
 
 
Purred: Wed Jun 6, '12 1:06pm PST 
I read online cats should never eat bones. Some people who feed their cats raw food said bones are needed for calcium. Naturally, I am confused about whether my cat would get sick on bones or not. Does it really matter?
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Merlin - An Angel- Forever

*Poof*
 
 
Purred: Wed Jun 6, '12 4:56pm PST 
Finely ground up bone (like almost powder-like) is fine to provide calcium. Raw poultry neck bones can be given to help clean the teeth. A cat will gnaw on the bone to clean the teeth.

If you worry about bone in homemade raw food, you can use a calcium supplement instead.

Cooked bones should never be given because the cooking process makes the bones really fragile and easy to splinter.
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Shade

My name is not- Kittyfloss!
 
 
Purred: Wed Jun 6, '12 5:52pm PST 
Hi Patricia. Yes, it does matter. A properly constructed raw diet consists of 80% muscle meat, 10% bone, 5% liver, and 5% other secreting organ (like kidney). If you buy a commercial raw diet like Nature's Variety medallions, they have ground bone in them along with the other ingredients. If you were to decide to make your own ground raw food, you must either put bone in it or put in a replacement for the calcium like ground eggshells or a commercial raw supplement. If you were to feed a prey model diet, which consists of chunks of meat etc., you must feed raw meaty bones, such as game hen pieces, chicken necks, and rabbit boney pieces to provide calcium.

Small raw bones will not hurt your cat; as previously mention by Merlin, it is cooked bones that you must never feed to a cat or dog as they splinter.

I hope this helps a bit.

Purrs,
Shade
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Patricia

The Old Lady
 
 
Purred: Wed Jun 6, '12 6:53pm PST 
Thanks for clearing that up. I definitely do not want to give my cats calcium supplements when the whole point of a "natural" diet is to avoid supplements.
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