GO!

BUN and creatinine levels in raw fed cats

This is a dedicated place for all of your questions and answers about Raw Diets. There are also some really cool groups like "Raw Fed" on the topic you can join. This forum is for people who already know they like the raw diet or sincerely want to learn more. Please remember that you are receiving advice from peers and not professionals. If you have specific health-related questions about your cat's diet, please contact your vet!

  
(Page 1 of 2: Viewing entries 1 to 10)  
Page Links: 1  2  
Pooka

Do the Pooka- Polka!
 
 
Purred: Mon Aug 6, '07 10:35am PST 
Well, I took my Pooka in today to get neutered. cry . The vet did call me later in the morning though to say that all the bloodwork was normal, except for the BUN and creatinine.

I told my vet that it was normal for raw fed animals to have slightly higher levels and that I was not concerned about these levels. I was hoping that I could find something in print regarding this issue, though. I did find an article regarding raw dogs and their normal levels, but it would help if I could find a specific article regarding kitties.

Oh, this was kind of funny; my vet asked me if I was sure that Pooka was getting all his vitamins and minerals. I was rather nonplussed by this, but said, yes, of course he is. He eats a very well balanced raw diet. Then the vet asked: "But is he getting enough taurine. Cats need high levels of taurine."

I said: "Well, of course he is! He gets a chicken heart every day! He gets tons of taurine."

Dead silence on the other end of the phone... then my very nice, but befuddled vet said that he would go ahead with the surgery. thinking
[notify]

Jabba the- Cat

PURRPURRPURR
 
 
Purred: Mon Aug 6, '07 11:34am PST 
Those levels have to do with kidney function as well, is kitty drinking enough water?
[notify]

Pooka

Do the Pooka- Polka!
 
 
Purred: Mon Aug 6, '07 1:48pm PST 
Yes, Pooka gets plenty of water, as well as moisture from his food.
[notify]


Jabba the- Cat

PURRPURRPURR
 
 
Purred: Mon Aug 6, '07 2:49pm PST 
Did you ever get any blood work done before kitty was on the raw food diet maybe kitty's levels are naturally a bit high???
[notify]

Pooka

Do the Pooka- Polka!
 
 
Purred: Mon Aug 6, '07 3:04pm PST 
No, this is his first. Pook's only 13 weeks old now.

Slightly higher levels are normal for cats and dogs on raw diets, so I really am not concerned. But it is hard to find studies regarding this on the 'Net. I did find a report concerning dogs, but I'd like to find a study regarding raw fed cats.

BTW - Pook came through his surgery with flying colors, and is resting comfortably. shh
[notify]

Luna

Don't ignore me!
 
 
Purred: Wed Aug 8, '07 2:22pm PST 
Im going to get in trouble for saying this, but cats fed raw will have kidney failure faster and younger. Cats are dying from kidney failure later in life as they are living longer lives. As a rule a cat with high kidney values should be fed a low protein diet.
I know raw seems better, but it seems to me as its a trend and scares me being a technicina for 12 years. We are seeing more kidney enzymes burned out by raw diets. Balance is the key. A kitten with high kidney values is strange. I would pull him off raw, put him on a well balance high grade kitten food, some canned and some dry and get his kidney level checked again.

Ve tech
www.cathealthnurse.blogspot.com

Edited by author Wed Aug 8, '07 2:22pm PST

[notify]

Luna

Don't ignore me!
 
 
Purred: Thu Aug 9, '07 8:42am PST 
Dogs and cats are completely different in how the break down proteins.
The reason there is not alot out there in the net, is plain and simple, there is not enough research on it.
Be careful.

vet tech 12 years
cathealthnurse.blogspot.com
[notify]

Pooka

Do the Pooka- Polka!
 
 
Purred: Thu Aug 9, '07 8:19pm PST 
Hmmmm. My last cat ate dry cat food, and died of CRF. Her mother ate dried cat food, and died of diabetes. But of course, it could not have been the food that killed them.

I think I'll give raw a chance.
[notify]

Luna

Don't ignore me!
 
 
Purred: Fri Aug 10, '07 6:30pm PST 
Well, dry food will not keep a cat from getting kidney failure or diabetes or prevent any disease. A cat will eventaully as it ages get some sort of ailment. I was concerned as you have a kitten with high levels already. Raw might not be the best. I gave a suggestion.


Vet tech 12 years
cathealthnurse.blogspot.com
[notify]

Nya - In loving- memory

Princess- extrordinaire!
 
 
Purred: Sun Aug 12, '07 12:42pm PST 
Interesting that you were told high BUN and creatine levels were normally higher in raw fed cats. I had *slightly* elevated levels on my bloodwork as well (unfortunatley, I don't have a pre-raw feeding baseline to go from, so we don't know if they were high before). I wonder if my vet knows anything more about it, I'll have to ask smile

However, I completely disagree with raw causing kidney issues. High protein does not cause kidney issues, unless the kidneys are already compromised, and I know of several "kidney cats" who feed raw (though well monitored) and are maintaining health. Keeping the moisture high, and the QUALITY of the protein high is more important for kidney health than any other factor.
[notify]

  (Page 1 of 2: Viewing entries 1 to 10)  
Page Links: 1  2