GO!

eating pets = eating cows??

  
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Oscar

Meow...
 
 
Purred: Mon Jan 5, '09 5:26pm PST 
This is such a weird idea...
I mean I kinda understand the idea that meat is meat
but honestly, pets are companions not food!

I can't believe some of the responses I read to this poll

Eating Pets

kitty
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kaya skye

not fighting my- demons-we joined- forces
 
 
Purred: Mon Jan 5, '09 8:40pm PST 
try this. pets are companions, and no, companions are not food. but it is not true that for all people in all places and times that "dog" or "cat" equals "pet". if you made a pet of a cow, i'm sure you would have a harder time eating beef. i've had pet rabbits, and can no longer even consider eating rabbit.
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Chibi

Proud mother of- the Gang of- Four!
 
 
Purred: Mon Jan 5, '09 8:45pm PST 
I couldn't find the responses, but I did read the main article.

I think that most of us who are animal lovers AND eat meat have to shut our eyes a bit. Not only does eating meat mean killing animals, but they usually don't have very good lives until being slaughtered, either. If all of us thought really hard about what this means, more of us might be vegetarians. I prefer just not to think about it and continue eating meat.

But...like most of us, I couldn't eat cat meat. Rabbit meat, yes. Dog meat, maybe (sorry...I've never had a meaningful relationship with a dog). Monkey meat, probably not (they're too much like humans). Living in Japan, and having been to several other Asian countries, I've eaten a lot of weird things: sea urchin and squid, sparrows, snake, frogs and toads, grasshoppers...but I still can't imagine eating cat.

Everyone has to decide for themselves what they can and can't eat. My best friend is a vegetarian, but he eats dairy products and eggs (unless they're fertilized). Some people will eat fish and chicken, but not other kinds of animal products.

Personally, I am less concerned about people eating chickens and cows than about how the livestock industry is managed. I'm no fan of PETA, but the gruesome videos they show of turkey farms and such probably give an honest picture of what is going on behind the scenes. I don't think we could ever convince most people to become vegetarian, but we can improve the way in which the meat we consume is processed.
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kaya skye

not fighting my- demons-we joined- forces
 
 
Purred: Mon Jan 5, '09 8:47pm PST 
then again, as the article points out, there are societies which make one animal the family dog, give him a name, etc...while consuming his siblings. a matter of expectations, i suppose. THIS animal is our friend, while THIS animal is dinner. i suppose if we can blithely consider cows and pigs and chickens food while making pets of others, i can see how comparmentalization can be even more fine-tuned.
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Boris

I'm cute and I- know how to use- that :)
 
 
Purred: Tue Jan 6, '09 11:28am PST 
Part of it all is that most human cultures not only sanction eating some type of meat, but a whole gastronomic milieu grows around it, such that it becomes easier to just compartmentalize and keep going.

Mom and dad are doing a vegan challenge. It all started with dad saying he could be a vegetarian if he wanted to in front of a friend who was. His friend said "yeah, vegetarian is not that hard, but vegan sure is [note: he has a brother who is in fact vegan]. I doubt you could last even a day". This somehow evolved into a bet, and so January became vegan month for dad. Mom decided to also eschew meat, dairy and eggs for the duration, since she reasons that otherwise dad will have too many temptations not to stick with it.

She says it sure is hard to do in modern culture, where animal-produced food is pervasive. She has had to read every label, and had had to give up pasta too, which she hadn't envisioned (see, most pasta is made in facilities that also handle milk/butter, which is a no-no for vegans). She hasn't been having cravings for pasta yet, but she says it's probably going to be inevitable. She also can't make a lot of the recipes she loves without having to do a lot of substituting, to the point where the recipes might not taste the same, and wouldn't even be worth it.
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kaya skye

not fighting my- demons-we joined- forces
 
 
Purred: Tue Jan 6, '09 1:56pm PST 
boris, tell your mom to check out epicurius.com (i think i'm spelling that right). they have recipes for every gastronomic niche. diabetic, gluten-free, vegan...if he weren't fictional, hannibal lecter would probably find epicurius.com instructive. but don't let that stop you.way to go
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Boris

I'm cute and I- know how to use- that :)
 
 
Purred: Tue Jan 6, '09 9:56pm PST 
Yes, mom is familiar with epicurious.com. But it doesn't solve the problem of having to use Earth Balance instead of butter, and soy milk instead of milk, and so forth.

Mom says she would kill for a piece of cheesecake right about now.
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♥- Suey- ♥

Loved
 
 
Purred: Tue Jan 6, '09 10:25pm PST 
From the mum-
I do think it is possible to be compassionate and a meat eater, it is just more expensive. We try to go for organic and free range as much as possible. While it took a bit of research at the beginning, it starts getting easier when you get used to what is 'good'. It's the same with products not tested on animals.

I do stick to the obvious meats though, mainly chicken and a bit of cow. I can't stomach the thought of rabbit, quail, horse etc.
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Harvey

Has been COTD!
 
 
Purred: Tue Jan 6, '09 10:39pm PST 
We have The Body Shop in Japan, and as you know, one of their selling points is "No animal testing." I thought about that one day, and asked the cashier, "What exactly does 'No animal testing' mean? That they test on humans instead?" She didn't have an answer...

Sorry to go off topic...blame it on 'nip.
smile
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♥- Suey- ♥

Loved
 
 
Purred: Wed Jan 7, '09 3:40am PST 
The bit the Body Shop doesn't tell you is that their parent company does test... wink

Choose Cruelty Free has the following criteria for their accreditation:
"The manufacturer of products and all related corporations (if any) must satisfy one of the following criteria:
- The never tested rule
None of its products and none of its product ingredients have ever been tested on animals by it, by anyone on its behalf, by its suppliers or anyone on their behalf;
-The five year (or +) rolling rule
None of its products and none of its product ingredients have been tested on animals by it, by anyone on its behalf, by its suppliers or anyone on their behalf at any time within a period of five years immediately preceding the date of application for accreditation.

CCF will not accredit a manufacturer if any of its products contain any ingredients:
*Derived from an animal killed specifically for the extraction of that ingredient;
*Forcibly extracted from a live animal in a manner that occasioned pain or discomfort;
*Derived from any wildlife;
*That are by-products of the fur industry; or
*That are slaughterhouse by-products of a commercially significant value."

http://www.choosecrueltyfree.org.au/list.html
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