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What color am I?

Got a new, young, furry love in your life? This is the place for you to ask all of your questions - big or small! Just remember that you are receiving advice from other cat owners and lovers... not professionals. If you have a major problem, always seek the advice of a vet or behaviorist! Most important is to remember to have fun with your new fur baby.

  
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Ghost

Sneaky
 
 
Purred: Fri Sep 30, '11 4:49am PST 
Im wondering what color I am.
Ive been told lots of things.
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Leo

purrrr
 
 
Purred: Fri Sep 30, '11 7:06am PST 
Maybe a cream tabby? My mom often wonders whether I would technically be a light orange tabby or cream tabby. You seem to have even less orange than me so I'm guessing cream tabby.
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Jager

Little Ferocious
 
 
Purred: Wed Oct 5, '11 2:28pm PST 
Id have to agree and say creme tabby, but your also adorable!
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Tequila

Anyone want a- Shooter?
 
 
Purred: Wed Oct 26, '11 5:10pm PST 
We've had playmates with your color and our humans called them "Cameo".
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Lola

Proud mother of- the Fab Four!
 
 
Purred: Wed Oct 26, '11 9:42pm PST 
You list yourself as a "seal lynx point," which I think is almost the correct guess. You probably have Siamese genetic heritage (not so uncommon in moggies), and so you are are a tabby with point coloration. Cream is the dilute form of red (red is cat show lingo for orange). Dilute means a lighter color; genetically speaking, a dilute coloration necessitates that both parents carry the dilute gene, although they may not be dilute themselves. In most non-colorpoint breeds (as far as I know; I'm mostly familiar with Maine Coons and the other cats I see at cat shows in the longhair ring), and in the regular moggy population, the dilute of black is blue (meaning grey, but not silver grey; that's a different color altogether). But in the case of colorpoint cats, seal dilutes to blue, and chocolate to lilac. Since you are (I'm assuming) a cream tabby and therefore carry the dilute gene, that would make you either a blue lynx point or a lilac lynx point, the dilute forms of seal and chocolate respectively. Is my guess.

That you are a colorpoint cat, and that your point coloration is tabby patterned, making you a lynx point, is probably safe to say. But I'm not sure if your point coloration is blue, lavender, or some other color (not seal, though), or whether you are indeed a cream tabby, or another similar variation such as cameo. Cameo tabbies, in which there is more contrast between the pale and dark areas of the coat than in cream tabbies, are, as far as I understand, cats with silver coated cats in their background. However, my knowledge of cat color genetics is limited regarding silvers. Many purebred breeds have silver variants (Maine Coon, Persian, American Shorthair, etc.), but silver is a very different color from the grey of a blue cat, or the grey of a grey tabby (grey tabbies are more correctly called brown tabbies in the cat world), and I'm not sure if silver coloration occurs naturally in moggies who don't have a purebred ancestor. My best guess is that you have the dilute gene, and that you have a seal or chocolate point Siamese ancestor (seal point is probably the most common Siamese color), and a moggy ancestor who carried the gene for red coloration, and so you are a cream tabby, which is more common in the moggy population (I think) than cameo or other light orange tabby color variations.

The fact that you have black eyeliner (cat show term), a dark rim around your nose leather, and black gums, is certainly not typical of a cream or red cat. I'm assuming that this comes from your colorpoint genes, but I'm not sure if blue or lavender point cats have such dark skin in those areas. Silver cats, however, do. As I am not an expert on colorpoint coloration or silvers, I really can't say what genetic influence made these areas black.

If you REALLY want to know what color you are, you can always compete in a cat show as a Household Pet. Meanwhile, if you provide more photographs (make sure that they portray your color accurately), and take some more photographs later on (your point coloration should darken some as you get older), we'll guess again.
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Cookie

Can we play??
 
 
Purred: Wed Oct 26, '11 10:19pm PST 
Leila beat me as I search my book but we are on the same track.

I pulled out my DK Eyewitness Handbooks "Cats". The small thumbnail picture looks like cream. I clicked on Ghost's picture to get a better look. Correct me, but Ghost's over all color is gray. So Cream & Cameo are on the orange hue side for tabbies. This is based on the pictures in the book. If I were to guess, Ghost is part part blue point lynx Siamese & part Tabby. He has pretty blue eyes & a cute pink nose. I'd bet, he is a talker too. We had one seal point, one chocolate point & two blue points siamese. I'd change the seal to blue & keep the lynx & add siamese & tabby.

Funny, we were at the Troy Kroger two weeks ago.
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Lola

Proud mother of- the Fab Four!
 
 
Purred: Thu Oct 27, '11 12:23am PST 
Hmm. The color resolution on my screen shows the body to be a cream color. If it's all grey, that makes things easier. Which is it, OP? Lynx point cats originated as a cross between a colorpoint cat in one of the orthodox shades and a tabby. Therefore, the Siamese who we assume is an ancestor did not have to be a lynx point Siamese in order to produce a lynx point descendant. I would take a guess that the Siamese ancestor would, from a statistical viewpoint, be more likely to be a seal point or a chocolate point (or blue or lilac point), rather than a lynx point, because seal and chocolate point Siamese have been around and breeding with the moggy population for ages. Lynx point Siamese in the CFA are called Colorpoint Shorthairs. Then there are the Lynx point Oriental Shorthairs. Both CSs and OSs are newer and more unusual breeds than Siamese. The newer and more unusual a breed is, the lesser the likelihood that it has bred with the moggy population, because breeders are more fussy about selling only altered cats nowadays. Backyard breeders and pet shops are not fussy about breeding rights, but are more likely to sell breeds that people are familiar with or which are popular at the moment. I see few Oriental Shorthairs at CFA shows in Japan, and I've never seen a Colorpoint Shorthair. They may be more common in the U.S. than in Japan, but if they are uncommon in Japan, it's usually fairly certain that they are not so common in the U.S. either.

If the body is grey as well, then my vote goes for a moggy with Siamese and tabby ancestors (not necessarily parents). Whether the Siamese ancestor in question is a dilute version of seal or chocoloate, or blue or lilac point, I don't know, but since seal point Siamese are common, and the dilute gene is common in moggies, I am tending to think that the most likely scenario. However--does the dilute gene in moggies work on Siamese colors?

All of this is guesswork, as I'm still learning about cat color genetics, but not an impossible scenario.
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Miss Puff

carma works,- wish I never- chaced Meow
 
 
Purred: Thu Oct 27, '11 10:46pm PST 
I would have to agree that you may me a blue point or color point Siamese. My Daughter has a Red/ Flame Point Siamese. But you look more blue then red. Give it time and then you will see!

cat on moon
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Ghost

Sneaky
 
 
Purred: Mon Apr 1, '13 2:11pm PST 
Im older now smile
I know Im lynx point for sure, but still not sure about base color.
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Allie Kat :- An Angel- Princess

Pink Princess- Panther!
 
 
Purred: Fri Apr 5, '13 8:29pm PST 
Blue point lynx. It took a while for mine to distinguish from lavender to blue as they can appear alike during their toddler/teenage growth.
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