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Please Help! Kitten Hip Dislocation

This forum is for cat lovers seeking everyday advice and suggestions on health-related issues. Remember, however, that advice on a public forum simply can't be a substitute for proper medical attention. Only your vet can say assuredly what is best for your cat.

  
Lilly

1279375
 
 
Purred: Fri Dec 21, '12 8:56am PST 
I have a 6 month old rescue that I found malnurished outside my office. Building security was actively trying to "rid" the feral cats so I bought a safe trap, caught her and brought her home. After a few vet visits to test, immunize and evaluate I began the task of slowly adapting her to human/indoor life. She has thrived. I love this animal to death. You almost get a sense she is thankful that she was rescued.
Flash forward to this week. I was playing with her when I arrived home and holding her favorite toy for her to bat out from the air. She got into her hunting mode, attacked and leaped into the air and when she came down she let out a huge hiss and retreated away with her hind leg tucked into her body. I immediately knew there was something wrong and scooped her up and placed her inside a hard shell pet carrier. I was not able to get to the vet until the following morning where to my shock I was told that x-rays show she has a congenative hip condition that already shows signs of advanced hip deterioration. :/ I have her home now and confined in my spare bedroom where there is a couch, all her toys, several beds and blankets (at floor level) and a litter box. She is taking a narcotic anti-inflammatory orally for 3 days and I have been given glucosamine/chondrotin to sprinkle on her food once a day. In addition I was told that a fish oil supplement would be beneficial.
My question is this: How long do I keep her confined/restricted? I could not reach the doctor today but the technician called me and said to restrict her as much as possible from stairs or jumping for weeks to 3 months. My problem is I don't see how this is even possible. I feel awful because she wants to play so bad, and move but instead is confined upstairs.
I'm asking for help from anyone who may have a young kitten with a condition with their hips and any advice they may have for me. How long should I keep her confined? At what point do I consider surgery? Will she still be able to live a long life? It breaks my heart thinking she is in pain, or even worse that this amazing little creature may not even have a chance at a long healthy life. Has anyone with a similar health experience with their pet learned of secondary conditions/related problems I should watch for? Any advice would be appreciated. Rest assured, I did not rescue her to play god and determine it's too much work. I'm willing to go bankrupt if need be to save this animal and give her a happy life. Thank you.
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Macy

Super- freakey----MEOW!
 
 
Purred: Sat Dec 22, '12 4:40pm PST 
I am sorry about what you are going through, and although I do not have any experience with hip dislocation, but when it comes to playing, perhaps keeping the toy just arms length above the head so they don't have to jump, or pull it on the floor? Poor baby must be going stir crazy.
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Lilly

1279375
 
 
Purred: Tue Dec 25, '12 11:23am PST 
Thank you. She is doing better! I'm still concerned though, because I know that cats have a high tolerance for pain. I'm hoping her ability to move around now isn't just because she's used to it. The leg is still limber, and she favors it slightly. Luckily this time of year I have time off so I go up to her hourly and play, walk her up and down the hallway and I've been doing the things I would normally do downstairs (computer, television or relaxing) upstairs with her instead of down here. I've noticed when I pick her up like normal, her back legs initially kind of hang down, and typically her paws on those hind legs are all spread out instinctivly. That right hind leg, the paw isn't spreading out. If anyone has any thoughts on that, please share. If you spread out all the toes on one of your foot, you'll notice it activates muscles up into your leg, so I'm hoping it's only the fact it's still tender and not anything more serious. I guess I'm just hoping she is "healing" vs. just learning to adapt with a lame peg leg. I think the vet thinks I'm nuts because I scheduled a follow up for later this week even though he didn't request one lol. Whatever though, better safe than sorry right? Especially with her age so young. She has so much life to live, and a 50 dollar vet visit would be a terribly short sighted thing to pass on in exchange for a long healthy pain free life. Thank you for you comment and conern smile She is napping in a sunny spot right now next to her toy "sushi" set she got for Christmas lol. Merry Christmas and god bless you all and your pets. May you have many many holidays to look forward to in the future.
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Felix

mon petit chat- noir
 
 
Purred: Wed Jan 2, '13 2:07pm PST 
What has the vet said beyond the initial diagnosis? If you are not happy, and do not feel confident, then get another opinion. It is hard to keep them down! My kitten Felix had a growth plate fracture in his front leg elbow, and even though he was limping, he was still trying to play. I tried to play with him lying on the bed, so that it was a soft surface, and he would bat at toys. The glucosamine is very good. There are other anti-inflammatory supplements too, but give this one a chance to work. I have too heard about fish oil helping. My other cat Tigger has arthritis in his spine, and the vet mentioned the fish oil. She was telling me about injections for it, so maybe as your baby gets older it may be something that could help her. You could even try a warm blanket or a well wrapped heat pad (so that he does not get burned) for her to lay on for a few minutes - the heat may be soothing, and hasten healing. Most important is that you gave this baby a wonderful home with lots of love. PLease let us know how things are going! hug
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Lilly

1279375
 
 
Purred: Mon Jan 7, '13 4:24pm PST 
Thanks for your concern and comments. She is doing great! She hasn't been limping at all. I'm thinking that me playing with her and her leg getting hurt may actually turn out to be a blessing in disguise. The facts are we can't change the fact that she has a congenital hip degeneration, so it's better to find out as early as possible. She has been taking Cosequin Glucosamine supplements in her food in the morning. One capsule sprinkled over it, mixed with a little water so it sticks to the food and she doesn't even notice. I also ordered pharmaceutical grade salmon fish oil with EPA/DHA levels consistent with what she needs. It's made for cats and dogs and comes in a stainless steel squirt bottle so I mix that with her evening meal, also no issues. In addition, I ordered a glucosamine "treat" snack for cats that has 50mg per treat. I did that as a supplement for her and my older cat, and she loves those as well. So we got her regiment started early, and I "cat proofed" the house so she can't really jump from super high areas to low and vice versa. I'm also very careful to spend time playing with her and came up with some games she likes to play without so much run/hunt/pounce involved. You would never know she has anything wrong with her. It's remarkable how much pain tolerance they have, and how fast a young animal bounces back.
So, she is doing well! I'm just going to continue giving her joint suplements, will carefully regulate her weight, encourage safer playing and always make sure no matter what she gets her regular check ups smile
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Macy

Super- freakey----MEOW!
 
 
Purred: Thu Jan 17, '13 7:30pm PST 
So glad she is doing better! snoopy
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