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How Do Cats Get FIP

This forum is for cat lovers seeking everyday advice and suggestions on health-related issues. Remember, however, that advice on a public forum simply can't be a substitute for proper medical attention. Only your vet can say assuredly what is best for your cat.

  
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Izzy

I meow a lot
 
 
Purred: Fri Nov 9, '07 5:05pm PST 
And what exactly is it? We've been seeing more and more on it. On reading about it, we understand it is a deadly disease, but HOW do kitties get it in the first place?

Thank you for all and any info.
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Lucky Boo,- Loved &- Missed

Mommy's Guardian- Angel

moderator
 
 
Purred: Fri Nov 9, '07 11:15pm PST 
Hi Izzy,

FIP is caused by a mutation of the coronavirus. It's a fairly common virus in cats and there are many different variants of it. But in the cats who have coronavirus, only about 5% get FIP. There are two types of FIP: Dry (non-effusive) and wet (effusive). Wet is fatal much faster than dry because it quickly causes fluid accumulation in the body cavities. Dry FIP can have many symptoms as it can cause lesions throughout the body. It often causes neurological and eye problems. Hope this helps some. It's a very confusing disease and I'm still trying to learn about it myself. I hope it's something nobody in your family ever has to deal with!

Purrs,
Lucky Boo

Diesel

Mommy's Little- Man
 
 
Purred: Sat Nov 10, '07 4:51am PST 
Cats get it from other cats via blood, saliva, urine and stool aka any body fluids. The virus can lay dormant in your house or outside for a month. If you have a cat that passes away from FIP it is highly suggested you clean all surfaces with bleach water and wait at least 30 days until you allow another cat in your home.
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Jerome(2004-- 2010)

A lap is a- terrible thing- to waste
 
 
Purred: Sat Nov 10, '07 9:38am PST 
FIP is a horrible disease in that there is no cure and like you were told it is either caused by the corona virus mutation or infection from a FIP sufferer. I was diagnosed with the dry form but I'm writing from home not the Bridge so I didn't have it. During the time I was sick Meowmy didn't bring another kitty (she does rescue) and kept me separated from the rest of other housekitties because it is so easy to transmit. No kitty survives it and I was given a couple of months to live..wal, I went I lived 3 more years and intend to live many more but not all kitties are so lucky..it is believed it can also be genetic; some breeds are more predisposed than others and from all wildcats cheetas are the ones that get FIP the most.
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Lucky Boo,- Loved &- Missed

Mommy's Guardian- Angel

moderator
 
 
Purred: Sat Nov 10, '07 10:37am PST 
Hey Jerome,

You're so lucky your diagnosis was wrong!

I have FIP and have been living with it since last April when I was diagnosed. I was having seizures and eye problems as well as coordination and balance problems. I take prednisone, phenobarbital, and interferon and do quite well most of the time. It is possible for kitties with dry FIP to live up to a year or even more, but unfortunately the disease is always fatal at some point and there is no cure. But I'm very glad there are some treatments.

More Purrs,
Lucky Boo

Izzy

I meow a lot
 
 
Purred: Sat Nov 10, '07 11:12am PST 
Oh, Lucky Boo, thank goodness you have such a caring mom. Everyday with you must be a cherished day for her.
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Lucky Boo,- Loved &- Missed

Mommy's Guardian- Angel

moderator
 
 
Purred: Sat Nov 10, '07 11:21am PST 
Oh absolutely, Izzy! Mom is so thankful for the extra time she has been given with me, since nobody expected me to still be around! She counts every day of my life as a blessing, even the bad days like yesterday when I pooped all over the apartment, MOL.

Purrs,
LB

Izzy

I meow a lot
 
 
Purred: Sat Nov 10, '07 11:32am PST 
Well, let's look at it this way, at least you're poopin'! That's one less thing mom has to worry about. (There are so many forum threads dealing with it...MOL) Sweet Boo, you are an amazing kitty and your mommy is amazing, too.
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Oscar - In Loving- Memory

to be the- sweetest cat
 
 
Purred: Sat Nov 10, '07 1:52pm PST 
http://www.dr-addie.com/PreventionS1.htm#How%20do%20cats%20and%20kit tens%20catch%20FCoV?

How do cats and kittens catch FCoV?

FCoV is a very contagious virus, infecting nearly all cats who encounter it. The major source of infection is the faeces of infected cats, and uninfected cats become infected by sharing litter trays with infected cats. The second major route of infection is the unintentional exposure of uninfected cats to tiny particles of infected faeces on people’s shoes or clothing, hands, poop scoops, etc. The infected cat likely swallows the virus when grooming, or when particles of faeces contaminate their food.

FCoV is occasionally shed in the saliva, early in infection, so sharing food bowls or inhaling sneezed droplets could possibly allow infection to occur. Close contact with infected cats, for example in mutual grooming, might, rarely, result in infection.

Feline coronavirus almost never crosses the placenta to the unborn kitten. Most kittens which become infected do so after protective antibody they receive in their mother’s milk has waned, usually when they are 5-7 weeks old.



Which of a cat's body secretions contain FCoV?

FCoV is mainly shed in the faeces, and is only shed in the saliva very rarely. At present, there is no evidence that FCoV is present in the tears or urine.



Litter tray hygiene - the most important thing you can do to save your cat from FCoV


If your cat uses a litter tray, then make sure it is declumped as often as possible and use dedicated poop scoops for each cat pen or tray. Better still, if possible, let the cat out to go to the toilet naturally outside (I am aware that this is not always possible or desirable where there is a lot of traffic). If you have several cats, make sure that you have enough litter trays, preferably one for each cat, and get covered or even self-cleaning litter trays. Site the litter tray away from food areas so that microscopic faecal particles cannot be blown onto the cat's food. Use a non-tracking cat litter, to minimise spread of microscopic particles around the house. Once or twice a week, clean your litter tray with domestic bleach (sodium hypochlorite). Do stick to bleach disinfectants, as pine based ones are toxic to cats. Vacuum as often as possible to reduce the number of contaminated cat litter particles.

How long does coronavirus survive in the environment?

In natural circumstances, cats go outside to defaecate and bury their faeces, in which case the virus lasts hours to days (it survives slightly longer in freezing conditions). However, in domesticating the cat we have introduced litter trays: FCoV may survive for several days and possibly up to 7 weeks in dried up faeces in cat litter.
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Oscar - In Loving- Memory

to be the- sweetest cat
 
 
Purred: Sat Nov 10, '07 2:05pm PST 
http://www.marvistavet.com/html/fip.html


IS FIP CONTAGIOUS?

Very simply, the answer is no.

SO HOW CAN AN INFECTIOUS DISEASE NOT BE CONTAGIOUS?

Feline Infectious Peritonitis is a reaction to infection with the feline coronavirus. Most cats who become infected with the feline enteric coronavirus (often simply called “feline coronavirus”) essentially get the flu and never develop anything that can in any way be described as serious. Some cats, however, react with this devastating syndrome.
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