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Game Inventors Hatch Plan to Get Escaped Cats Back Home

The Kitty Convict Project, created by the makers of Exploding Kittens, would have indoor cats wear orange collars to identify them as escapees.

Phillip Mlynar  |  Dec 7th 2015


Remember the Exploding Kittens phenomenon from earlier this year? You know, the crowd-funded, comic book-style, kitty-themed card game that saw its creators become millionaires almost overnight? Well, now that the guys behind the game have presumably relocated to private islands and are living the good life, they’re attempting to give something back to the cat community. They call it the Kitty Convict Project.

In short, the idea attempts to sovle the problem of an estimated 7 million pets who go missing every year. It does this by encouraging all indoor cats to wear orange collars.

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Image via Kitty Convict.

As the blurb on the project’s slick website puts it:

“When people see a dog running around the neighborhood, they assume it’s lost. When people see a cat running around the neighborhood, they just assume it’s an outdoor cat so it never gets reported.”

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Image via Kitty Convict.

The thinking goes like this: If your indoor feline escapes and is wearing an orange collar, kindly passersby will know that the cat is an escapee, as it were, and will scoop the kitty up. (The color orange is specified because it’s more bright and reflective than, say, olive drab.)

The Kitty Convict website includes links to buy the orange collars online, for around $14. The company also claims “it’s actually costing us money to sell these collars at this price. We took the extra revenue from our game sales and used it to subsidize the collars.”

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Image via Kitty Convict.

So, what do you think? Is this a viable solution to help get escaped cats back home?

Personally, I’m not entirely convinced. While it’s certainly a well-meaning campaign, it’ll work only if the majority of indoor cats wear some orange, otherwise many escaped cats without collars might be wrongly assumed to be outdoor cats. Without a high sign-up rate, the effort might actually promote the opposite effect.

Either way, head over to the Kitty Convict website to judge for yourself.

About the author: Phillip Mlynar writes about cats, music, food, and sometimes a mix of all three. He considers himself the world’s foremost expert on rappers’ cats.