My kitten’s new teeth are coming in over his baby teeth. Will his baby teeth come out on their own? They do not seem to be loosening up any. What do I do?

Carol
Ocala FL

Dogs and cats, like humans, have two sets of teeth during their lifetimes. The first set of teeth are called deciduous teeth or baby teeth. They erupt within a few weeks of birth.

Deciduous teeth generally fall out between four and six months of age as adult teeth underneath them erupt. In some cases, however, the adult teeth develop adjacent to the baby teeth rather than underneath them. In these instances, both adult and deciduous teeth may be present in the mouth. These so-called retained deciduous teeth are most common in Persians, Pugs, Boston Terriers, Shih Tzus and other breeds with short noses.

If your kitten’s adult teeth are still erupting, there is a good chance that the baby teeth will become loose and fall out spontaneously. However, I’d recommend that you have a vet check him out. Retained deciduous teeth can lead to malocclusion (improper location of the teeth in the mouth) or to premature dental decay if food becomes stuck between an adult tooth and a baby tooth. In some cases, retained deciduous teeth must be extracted by veterinarians.

Photo note: I’m confident Dega’s teeth erupted normally.