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An Animal Communicator Speaks on "Talking" to Your Cat

Gretchen Pollnow talks about psychic connections and the profound bonds between us and animals.

 |  Oct 17th 2013  |   14 Contributions


When I first saw Gretchen Pollnow at a cat show a few weeks ago, I had a sense I'd get to know her. Our booths were next to each other, and after we chatted for a while I was absolutely certain we'd become friends. I've always had a sense about people and seem to know, almost instantly, if we have a connection. I believe we all have an intuitive nature -- some more naturally or developed than others. 

At their booth, not only were Gretchen and her mom, Grace, selling all sorts of cool cat-themed treasures, they also offered intuitive readings ... for pets. The pet didn't have to be present -- Gretchen and Grace were able to psychically tune in to them and convey their messages and feelings. I know the idea of psychic communication is a stretch for some -- and completely unbelievable to others. And that's OK. I totally get that it's hard to believe what you can't see. I just personally find the subject immensely fascinating. I would love to know what my cats are thinking and whether there's anything else I can do to make their lives more comfortable. And, honestly, I'd be interested to discover what they think about my family members and me -- and what they say about each other! 

Gretchen and one of her childhood cats, Mosha.

Gretchen is a mom to two kids, a parakeet named Sir Cottonball Wisp, and a 13-year-old calico called Gladys. I've met pet communicators but have never really asked them questions about their gifts. Gretchen took a break from her active schedule and agreed to satisfy my curiosity. I asked her what being an animal communicator means. Is it the same for everyone? She said she imagines each person would answer differently, but for her, it means she has the ability to hear what animals have to "say." That is, if they have something to say. She goes on to say animals can generally understand what she's saying, visualizing, feeling, or intending. She has the ability to communicate with animals who are alive, as well as those who've passed over the Rainbow Bridge. 

You don't have to read minds to know what Gladys is thinking of Sir Cottonball Wisp!

Gretchen has always been highly intuitive and grew up assuming it was "normal" for everyone to hear and feel the things she did. She found that not only could she communicate with animals -- people also came to her. She shared a childhood experience wherein her recently passed grandma -- and all the cats of her lifetime -- came to her through an unplugged TV. Her grandma only wanted to tell Gretchen she was OK. This must have felt scary and comforting, all at the same time. 

Gretchen's mother also has the gift, but it became more developed later in life. Gretchen says, "She would express envy and I would brush it off because I knew she would awaken her gift someday. After all, she is the person who taught me how to treat animals with respect. Without respect, animals won't say much to you. They can tell who is ready to listen."

Grace and Gretchen on Gretchen's third birthday.

Gretchen and Grace have a pet-sitting business (their human clients know they are communicators) and say the animals for whom they sit definitely communicate with them, and they have to make sure to establish boundaries. She says, "When animals are upset, they can share an amazing amount of stuff about their people (or other pets). So I do my best to let them know we can talk about their favorite games, toys, or windows to look out, saving the serious stuff for when or if I have permission to get personal. Some animals are silent -- I can imagine what it is like to have a 'stranger' in their home -- while others become close friends."

Gretchen says we'd be surprised at the number of cats who curse while she's in their home. She wonders if this is because vulgarity is commonplace in the home, or if this kind of "language" is common in the animal kingdom. One aggressive cat even told her to "get the f@*k out of my house." Yikes!

Gorgeous Gladys.

Can anyone develop animal communication skills? Personally, I believe we all have the ability on some level. How often have we looked into our beautiful kitty's eyes and known exactly what she was feeling or thinking? I believe it's a connection we all have with those whom we love.

Gretchen believes most people are born with the ability to communicate. She says, "Life and experience cause us to shut down certain things or open things up." She says it's important to pay attention to our instinct, slow down and really listen and feel. She continues, "I wish I had more specific instructions, but this has been a part of me for so long, it is, at times, like breathing. I just do it without thinking about it now." She believes that because she has been more open to the public about her gifts, her abilities are more focused.

Gretchen sneaks in a snuggle with Gladys.

Whether or not you believe humans have the ability to psychically communicate with animals, I think we can all agree on one point: We have special connections with our animal companions, and we adore them with all our hearts. These furry friends sense our joy and knowingly comfort us when we're feeling low. They curl up in our laps, gazing at us with unconditional devotion, and our heart-strings become lovingly entwined. We miss each other when we're apart and instantly feel at home when reunited. Our undeniable connection is profound and life-changing. 

To learn more about animal communication, visit Gretchen and Grace's All Creatures Chat site or Facebook page.

Do you have any experience with animal communicators? Can you communicate with animals? Tell us about it in the comments!

About the Author: Angie Bailey is an eternal optimist with a adoration of all things silly. Loves pre-adolescent boy humor, puns, making up parody songs, thinking about cats doing people things and The Smiths. Writes Catladyland, a cat humor blog, Texts from Mittens (birthed right here on Catster) and authored whiskerslist: the kitty classifieds, a silly book about cats wheeling and dealing online. Partner in a production company and writes and acts in comedy web series that features sketches and mockumentaries. Mother to two humans and three cats, all of which want her to make them food.

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