Acupuncture Point for Relief of Respiratory Distress

 |  Jul 10th 2009  |   1 Contribution


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Alternative pet health writer Donita Mason recently brought this to my attention, in an attempt to get the word out about an alternative method of relieving respiratory distress. If you have an asthmatic animal, this is not intended to be used in place of any medication your companion may be taking nor the services of an emergency vet. But it will buy you some time while you are getting to that vet.

Not long ago you saw the acupuncture point that is used for heart distress including heart attacks and when the heart has stopped beating. GV27 is the first point on a list of 6 points that everyone who shares their lives with a pet should know. Today you will see the 2nd point which is used for lung problems and respiratory distress including asthma and bronchial coughs.

Lung 7 (LU7), also known as Broken Sequence, is located on the inside of the front paw on the side closest to the body, just above the wrist (see right). You will find it in the depression above the small protrusion at the end of the radius bone. You will massage this in an up and down and circular motion.

In addition to the Chinese remedy Yin Chiao, you can use this point to help an animal who has chronic upper respiratory infections. It is helpful for stopping a dry cough such as one you would see with kennel cough, as well as helping to expel phlegm from a bronchial cough.

In his book "Love, Miracles and Animal Healing", Dr. Allen Schoen tells about the owner of an asthmatic cat using this point in the middle of the night to help his cat when he saw an asthma attack coming on. If you have an asthmatic animal this is not intended to be used in place of any medication your companion may be taking nor the services of an emergency vet. But it will buy you some time while you are getting to that vet.

In addition to respiratory ailments, this point can be massaged to help with constipation, dry, red and inflamed ears, and treatment of dry and itchy skin in general. These obviously don't have the urgency you would find with respiratory distress, but they are good to know about.

As always, the information given here is not meant as a replacement for the advice of your veterinarian. It is intended to give you information so that you can make an informed decision.

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[LINK: Top Photo: Maxshouse.com; Article: Examiner.com]

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