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Should I be worried?

This forum is for cat lovers seeking everyday advice and suggestions on health-related issues. Remember, however, that advice on a public forum simply can't be a substitute for proper medical attention. Only your vet can say assuredly what is best for your cat.

  
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Maverick

1148113
 
 
Purred: Fri Apr 8, '11 6:44pm PST 
Popeye has been ingesting some clumping typed litter while grooming his paws and he is not doing so well now. He hasn't been as active and he's having a hard time breathing like he has a respiratory problem. He hasn't been eating as much either and he got an upset stomach today. I changed back to a newspaper pellet typed litter and I'm thinking about making an appointment with the vet. Am I just being a worry wart? confused
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Lacey

Backflips are my- specialty!
 
 
Purred: Fri Apr 8, '11 6:47pm PST 
No, you're not being a worry wart. Get rid of that litter quickly and get something natural like World's Best Cat Litter or Dr. Elsyies! The clumping litters contain Bentonite clay which is known to cause these kinds of issues. It can aggravate their lungs and cause asthma and respiratory distress. Especially from breathing in the dust. What I would do is get him to the vet regardless, just to make sure there's nothing serious going on. But absolutely go and pick up some new litter tomorrow. It will make a world of difference. Finney and Lacey used to sneeze with that old stuff. I learned pretty quickly it was bad for them and they've been fine ever since. Good luck and please keep us posted! Glad you came and asked this question, good for you! You really can't be too careful. way to go
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Maverick

1148113
 
 
Purred: Fri Apr 8, '11 6:54pm PST 
The clumping litter I was using was Dr.Elsey's..I loved how it had no dust and it clumped well but I didn't expect pieces to get stuck on their paws. frown
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Rusty

let no food bowl- be empty
 
 
Purred: Fri Apr 8, '11 7:13pm PST 
Your cat needs to go to a vet now!! Please even if you have to go to an emergency clinic you must go now because your cat could die from the way he is acting. Please go now.
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Lacey

Backflips are my- specialty!
 
 
Purred: Sat Apr 9, '11 8:22am PST 
Yes, respiratory issues are very serious and if you were already using the good litter, then something is up here. I'm sorry, I thought for sure it was the litter. I'd get him to the vet pronto. Please keep us posted! hug
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Emily

Don't pet, play!
 
 
Purred: Sat Apr 9, '11 9:52am PST 
Wow...I'd go to the vet now. Someone on the other thread commented that ingested litter shouldn't cause breathing problems...that makes sense. Seems it would make digestive problems. Dr. Elseys is low dust. Maybe its the litter....but sounds like your cat is in bad shape regardless of the cause.

And, a side note...we just started trying Dr. Elseys. I was reading on their website and their litter is made from bentonite clay. They state that all clumping litters are. (Though I doubt that is true for the corn, wheat ones that claim to clump...never tried them myself. Dr. Elseys is the first clumping litter we've tried.)

Edited by author Sat Apr 9, '11 10:07am PST

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Maverick

1148113
 
 
Purred: Sun Apr 10, '11 1:58am PST 
Popeye seems to be doing better now, he's acting more normal now and he's eating again. big grin
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Bumpurr

RESPECT The- Star!
 
 
Purred: Sun Apr 10, '11 6:38am PST 
Somebody else on here, had an issue with Dr Elseys litter, I forget now which post, it might be in the clean cat forum. Horses can get what is called Sand Colic. Because horses eat grass and hay on the ground, sometimes they can ingest sand, and it builds up, and impacts them. For horses, any colic is extremly dangerous, because horses can't throw up, like people, cats or dogs, and they can die from colic. wave

I think, being this is the 2nd post about Dr Elseys, I would be switching litter. way to go

If a person had a hard time breathing, you would get them to a hospital, right away, its the same for kitties, don't delay getting them to a vet. way to go big grin wave
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Miss Edith

Oh rly foo?
 
 
Purred: Sun Apr 10, '11 7:04am PST 
This is a clinical case study of bentonite clay toxicity

http://thelighthouseonline.com/articles/hornfeldt.html

It's kind of disturbing since the owner of the cat continued to use the clay litter after the cat had been hospitalized repeatedly until s/he finally killed the cat. I don't get cat owners sometimes I think they don't think of cats as pets but rather like houseplants?

But you get an idea of what happens.
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BooBoo

headed for the- light.
 
 
Purred: Sun Apr 10, '11 7:06am PST 
IMO, the fact that his difficulty breathing happened when you changed litter is probably just a coincidence, if he hasn't had a problem with other litter. If it's not better, or gets worse by tonight I'd get him into the vet's office Monday. There's a tiny, tiny possibility he's allergic to the herbal component of Dr Elsey's, but it is an all natural litter and so it would be really odd for that to be the case.

Miss Edith, (sorry--I am picking on you AGAIN, but I am a science nerd and I'm picky about how evidence is presented!) that case report (not the same thing as a case study!)says you did not mention that that there was a followup to that case repot (which only involves one cat). It mentions that the cat chronically ATE litter, and that the litter was Tidy Cat, which contains additives. It takes quite a lot of clay to poison a person or animal. So a grain or two a day isn't cause for concern. You may know this, but you may be too young; in the past, even when I was a kid, it was common for poor people to eat various types of clay. It was due to a craving for certain minerals they were not getting. In extreme cases, eating too much could poison them. I suspect that might be what happened to the kitty in the case report, but I'm getting off track. Here's the response to the case study that was published. ALWAYS keep in mind when you read these things, if they are merely a report of a one-time incident, that is not the same as in depth scientific research!
##############################

These letters were published in the Journal of Veterinary and Human Toxicology, Vol. 39, No. 3, June 1997.

Dear Editor,

This letter is written in response to a case report published in your journal: "Suspected Bentonite Toxicosis in a Cat from Ingestion of Clay Cat Litter" (October 1996). It was sent to me by Sorptive Minerals Institute, a trade association based in Washington, DC which represents the marketers and manufacturers of clay-based litters.

In my opinion, there was no evidence presented which supports the authors' conclusions that the ingestion of bentonite was causative of the cat’s problems and there was extensive evidence that it was not. Below are specific inconsistencies in the report that call the author's conclusions into question.

—99% bentonite litter is not TIDY CAT~ Lowe's Incorporated South Bend, IN. The case report is mistitled at best.

—"By that afternoon the cat was eating solid food and urinating normally. The following day the cat was active, alert and eating." The cited case reports of hypokalemia and anemia associated with clay ingestion in humans (see references 1-3) took 3 days to resolve, and required iv supplementation with potassium.

—K = 3.1 m Eq/L (normal 4.0-6.0). This is compatible with mild hypokalemia. The authors do not report any clinical cardiac abnormalities referable to potassium deficiency: no tachycardia, no irregular pulse. The human cases cited had much lower serum K levels when they were presented with clinical signs (1.5-1.9 m Eq/L).

—4% reticulocyte count. The implication is that the anemia is regenerative. However, this value was not corrected for the degree of anemia. When corrected, the reticulocyte count becomes

Edited by author Sun Apr 10, '11 7:23am PST

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