Postings by Retsina, 1993-2010

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Cat Health > Can spayed cats still go in heat on occasion?
Retsina,- 1993-2010

Queen of the- Mansion- (retired)
 
 
Purred: Tue Jun 1, '10 10:54pm PST 
Retsina was very undersized due to malnutrition when I adopted her, and I was trying to wait for her to get a little larger before spaying her. She went into heat, and after several attempts to schedule her spay surgery, the vet finally told me to just wait for a day she wasn't in heat, fast her overnight, and call ahead the next morning to be sure they had room in the schedule that day.

One of the more frustrating ways in which cats aren't dogs. big grin
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Sasha 9/6/06-10/3/12, Jun 2 8:50 am

Saying Goodbye: Memorials & Support > Retsina is gone to the Bridge
Retsina,- 1993-2010

Queen of the- Mansion- (retired)
 
 
Purred: Sat Feb 20, '10 2:14pm PST 
She was sixteen. Until the last year, her vets asked me if I was really sure about her age, and made jokes about having a Picture of Dorian Kitty in the attic. In the last year, though, she slowed down, her kidneys started to fail--and finally her liver failed to. Right up to the end, she was still eating, drinking, and demanding her share of attention and love.

She was the sweetest little kitty in the world.
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» There has since been 8 posts. Last posting by Sky, Mar 8 5:38 pm


Behavior & Training > Stray Cat keeps savaging our Mum

Retsina,- 1993-2010

Queen of the- Mansion- (retired)
 
 
Purred: Thu Nov 26, '09 7:43am PST 
He deserves a chance for sure!

But your mum needs to as much as possible give him space, like, not try to move him directly, but distract him or throw treats or toys to lure him away. And do some clicker training! Click and treat him for coming near her, for being calm, for doing anything remotely friendly.

But as far as getting him to the vet for his, ahem, little operation, that might be a challenge this soon. Are there any especially yummy treats that he might go into the carrier for? My sneaky mum would leave the carrier out for a week or two beforehand, randomly putting yummy treats in it that any of you might find, and watch to make sure that this Freddie character gets lots of chances. And If she can do it without getting scratched, click him and toss another especially yummy treat in when she sees him going in. Then on the Big Day, it should be possible to lure him into the crate or move carefully when he's already in there, and close it!

But if that doesn't work, she might have to bite the bullet. Maybe wear rubber gloves or work gloves when she's putting him in? It's only once, and it will be over quick, and when he comes home afterward, she can work on making friends with him.
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» There has since been 8 posts. Last posting by Kaidan, Nov 28 2:48 pm


Behavior & Training > help i hate the puppy!

Retsina,- 1993-2010

Queen of the- Mansion- (retired)
 
 
Purred: Wed Jul 25, '07 6:56pm PST 
In addition to what others have said, the cats really do need to have a dog-free zone. Even with the friendliest dogs and cats, it really promotes inter-species peace and harmony if the cats know that they have someplace to go that the dog can't. That's not a temporary thing, the cats should always have someplace that's jus theirs. For my cats, it's the basement--the dog doesn't go down there.
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Retsina, 1993-2010, Jul 25 6:56 pm


Behavior & Training > I'm so proud of my girl

Retsina,- 1993-2010

Queen of the- Mansion- (retired)
 
 
Purred: Wed Jul 25, '07 6:41pm PST 
That's great news! Nala deserves some extra fine catnip, for finallyovercoming her fears like that!
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Retsina, 1993-2010, Jul 25 6:41 pm

Behavior & Training > Major break Through
Retsina,- 1993-2010

Queen of the- Mansion- (retired)
 
 
Purred: Wed Jul 11, '07 12:06pm PST 
Great news!
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» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by Nala, Jul 15 9:41 pm


Behavior & Training > How do you discipline a kitten?

Retsina,- 1993-2010

Queen of the- Mansion- (retired)
 
 
Purred: Fri Jun 22, '07 1:58pm PST 
Is Emma really a month old!?

She's not being mean. She's being a kitten. Her instincts tell her you have a nice thick fur coat over your skin, and she doesn't have the experience to know better yet. Also, if she really left her mom as young as a month, you're going to have to work on her socialization, and teach her things her mom and littermates should have taught her--like bite inhibition and control of those retractable claws. Also using the litterbox, and maybe washing herself daily.

What Arwen said about how to convey the message that certain behavior is unacceptable is good, although once she's bigger there's nothing wrong with adding a gentle tap on the nose to your repertoire. That's with one finger, and very quick and soft. It doesn't have to be anything more than that, to convey the message. Blowing gently in the cat's face also works. These are all things that don't hurt the cat, but do make clear that what they're doing right now is unacceptable.

What are you feeding her? Has she seen the vet? Do plan on spaying her; it's even more important for a cat's health than a dog's, because cats can, from the time they reach maturity, be pregnant, nursing, or in heat almost constantly.

She's a beautiful baby! You'll both adjust, and do fine.
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» There has since been 6 posts. Last posting by , Oct 4 8:58 pm


Kitten Corner > Breeder and Food requirment: Conflict of Interest?

Retsina,- 1993-2010

Queen of the- Mansion- (retired)
 
 
Purred: Thu Jun 14, '07 8:48am PST 
Anyone trying to legally obligate me to switch Retsina's food can keep their sales-bait kittens. (Or Aquavit's or Addy's, either, but Retsina's the one with the food allergies and iffy digestion.)

I'd have some sympathy with a breeder trying to ensure that you had the food their kittens were on for a transition period--but not for this kind of attempted strong-arm food-sales tactic.
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» There has since been 3 posts. Last posting by Bodrouex, Jul 16 9:29 pm


Cat Health > What do we do after the babies are born?

Retsina,- 1993-2010

Queen of the- Mansion- (retired)
 
 
Purred: Thu Jun 14, '07 8:29am PST 
The Baileys--If you have a normal, healthy mother, the survival rate of kittens raised by Mom is much higher than the survival rate of hand-raised kittens. There are also potential developmental/behavioral issues. This doesn't mean the success rate is zero, and and when the kittens are hand-reared by people with experience doing it and adequate support, there's a greater likelihood of success.

Ma Bailey was sick and needed the demands on her physical and mental capacities reduced so that she could recover, and they still didn't take all her kittens from her--just some of them. That's because being deprived of the kittens too early is hard on Momma, too, not just the kittens.

If Persephone is healthy and well and a good mother, as long as she continues to care for her kittens, there's no reason to separate them from her and hand-rear them, and a lot of reasons not to--even if she goes into heat! The main things are, Is she a good mother? and Is she effectively contained, so she can't get pregnant again before the kittens are ready to go and she can be spayed?

Separating them early wouldn't even have "convenience" on its side, given the work involved in hand-rearing young kittens.

If she loses interest in the kittens, or becomes hostile to them, that's another matter entirely.
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» There has since been 4 posts. Last posting by Persephone - MIA :-(, Jun 15 10:11 pm

Cat Health > What do we do after the babies are born?
Retsina,- 1993-2010

Queen of the- Mansion- (retired)
 
 
Purred: Wed Jun 13, '07 7:54am PST 
Hand-raising kittens has a high failure rate, and it's not something to do by choice. Momma Cat, if she's a good momma, does a much better job of raising newborn kittens than humans do.

Let her raise her kittens, and wean them, unless she seems to be either neglectful or destructive. Make sure she has no chance to get out. Have her fixed as soon as the kittens are weaned.

Consult with the vet on when he feels comfortable fixing the kittens. Most feel that 4-6 months is optimal. Some will spay/neuter younger, even as young as 8 weeks, but that's mostly for shelter kitties who need to be fixed before they can be adopted.
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» There has since been 7 posts. Last posting by Persephone - MIA :-(, Jun 15 10:11 pm

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