Postings by Bert (Miss You! '88-'07)

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Rescue, Adoption & Happy Endings > rescuing an "owned" outdoor cat
Bert (Miss- You!- '88-'07)

Brrrrrrrt!

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Purred: Fri Mar 7, '14 1:10pm PST 
Since the cat has an owner, you can't legally take him without the owner's consent. (If the cat "just happened" to "follow" you home, it doesn't sound like the owner would worry too much about his cat being stolen, though. shh)


But since you aren't interested in adopting the cat yourself, I would talk to a local rescue group and see if they would be interested in approaching the owner to see if he is willing to surrender the cat. If he isn't willing, though, I don't think there's much you can do legally unless there is proof of neglect or abuse.

» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Bert (Miss You! '88-'07), Mar 7 1:10 pm

Cat Health > Urgent Help for Herby
Bert (Miss- You!- '88-'07)

Brrrrrrrt!

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Purred: Sat Apr 27, '13 10:52am PST 
We wish we could help everyone in the world, but for safety reasons, Catster cannot allow for the public solicitation of charity or donations unless verified and approved by Catster HQ. You may obtain a Fundraising Request form by sending an email to fundraisingrequest@dogster.com.

Please refer to the Catster Community Guidelines or contact Catster HQ directly with any questions.

We will re-open this thread as soon as the fundraiser has been approved.

» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Catster HQ, Apr 27 10:54 am


Choosing the Right Cat > I want to see the kitten before I choose

Bert (Miss- You!- '88-'07)

Brrrrrrrt!

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Purred: Mon Feb 27, '12 2:10am PST 
We've never bought from a breeder, but....it seems like this person wouldn't charge a bunch of money up front unless there was something to hide. "I won't even let you meet a kitten unless you pay $100 -- nonrefundable!" sounds like they're attempting to charge you for something that they know you won't want.

The shelters and rescues we've worked with in the past have not only not charged to meet a kitten, they've let potential adopters take cats home for a trial period before committing to adoption.

If you're determined to buy a cat with papers, though, you might have to deal with the "up front" expense to meet a potential purchase.

» There has since been 18 posts. Last posting by ♥ Roxy ♥, Mar 1 8:45 pm


Behavior & Training > this cat is driving me up the wall!

Bert (Miss- You!- '88-'07)

Brrrrrrrt!

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Purred: Wed Oct 21, '09 1:44am PST 
From what I understand, these domestic/wild hybrids retain wild traits beyond just their pretty coat markings.

Here is an article I found about hybrid cats from a group that specializes in wild cat rescues:
http://www.bigcatrescue.org/cats/wild/hybrids.htm

I guess that all I can suggest is that when you choose to buy a domestic/wild hybrid, you will have to learn to accept the fact that they are still partially wild.
shrug

» There has since been 45 posts. Last posting by Colin, Nov 30 9:12 am


Behavior & Training > MY CAT HAS ALL MY PATIENCE HOSTAGE.

Bert (Miss- You!- '88-'07)

Brrrrrrrt!

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Purred: Sat Jan 31, '09 1:36am PST 
I guess I'm a little confused as to why someone who would have rehomed a Bengal who "didn't work out" because of personality issues would adopt another Bengal and expect her to not act like a Bengal.thinking

It's true that pets generally learn to adapt to the expectations of their owners, but to a large extent, owners have to learn to adapt to their pets, too.

It probably would be a good idea to adjust the environment to accommodate Bella. It would at least make more sense than punishing her for being what you knew she was before you adopted her.

» There has since been 6 posts. Last posting by Bishop, Mar 7 3:42 am

Other Meows & Purrs > not sure where to post this.....
Bert (Miss- You!- '88-'07)

Brrrrrrrt!

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Purred: Wed Jul 16, '08 8:55pm PST 
If you see a group which is truly inappropriate for Catster (if you're not sure, please review the Community Guidelines), you should report it to Catster HQ.

There is a contact form for HQ here:
http://www.catster.com/contact.php

The Moderators only handle the public Forums. Group Administrators moderate their own groups. All activities on Catster, though, must abide by the Community Guidelines.

» There has since been 15 posts. Last posting by the kaya skye & shyloh paige, Jul 18 6:57 am


Cat Health > To declaw or not to adopt...

Bert (Miss- You!- '88-'07)

Brrrrrrrt!

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Purred: Fri Jul 6, '07 11:29pm PST 
That's true, Winnie and Chester! With regular trimming, a cat's claws wouldn't be much sharper than a puppy's nails.

I was one of the lucky older kitties who was adopted, and I was already declawed. It's so hard to find homes for older cats, but we really are much more laid-back than kittens, who can be terrors even aside from their claws!

It is important to take into account, though, that some of the cats who are declawed and then find themselves back at the shelter are there because, after the procedure that was imposed on them, they developed problems like resorting to biting because they didn't have their claws for defense anymore or not using the litter box because they found it too painful to dig in the litter with their stumps. They aren't all there for that reason, of course--I wound up needing a new home because my original humans were very elderly and gave me up when they went to a nursing home--but it is a definite possibility.

In a home with a dog, I can imagine it could encourage a declawed cat to develop a biting habit as hierarchy skirmishes ensue since he will be unable to use claws. Cat bites, if they break the skin, are puncture wounds that can be much more serious to a human than superficial scratches.

If I were to give my advice, my first choice would be to adopt an adult cat, who's already outgrown the playful biting and scratching of a kitten, who isn't declawed and use soft paws to prevent scratches. Second choice would be to adopt a cat who's already declawed but be prepared for the possibility of re-training in litter box use and not biting (though the latter might be tougher with a dog in the house since the cat need to be able to use his teeth for self-defense). Third choice would be to adopt a kitten and trim his nails or use soft-paws (I'm not sure what the smallest size is, but they might not fit a very small kitten), but be prepared for a kitten's playful biting. Last choice would be to get a kitten and declaw him (which could in turn cause biting and litter-box avoidance, but I hope that wouldn't result in him being sent back to kitty death row--aka the shelter).

Ultimately, there are advantages and disadvantages to any adoption, but the most important thing is that you are able to provide a responsible, loving home to a kitty who really needs it.way to go

» There has since been 24 posts. Last posting by Catster HQ, Jul 8 7:41 pm


Laws & Legislation > Iams bad for animals

Bert (Miss- You!- '88-'07)

Brrrrrrrt!

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Purred: Mon Jun 25, '07 10:49pm PST 
This subject has been discussed at length several times before. If you'd like to read more about it, please use the Forums "quick search" feature.

Thanks, everykitty! kitty

» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Catster HQ, Jun 25 10:50 pm


Catster Lifestyle, News & Entertainment > PETA goes to far!

Bert (Miss- You!- '88-'07)

Brrrrrrrt!

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Purred: Sat Jun 23, '07 8:17pm PST 
Actually, the phrase "There's an elephant in the room," refers to an issue that people are ignoring or refusing to acknowledge, even though everyone "in the room" is obviously aware of it. The expression itself doesn't have anything to do with someone's weight.

Ms. Newkirk does, at least, correctly point out that the need for healthcare usually decreases when people adopt healthier lifestyles.

» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Bert (Miss You! '88-'07), Jun 23 8:17 pm

Cat Health > Not eating.
Bert (Miss- You!- '88-'07)

Brrrrrrrt!

moderator
 
 
Purred: Wed Jun 20, '07 11:27pm PST 
Not eating is a definite sign that something is wrong. I wouldn't wait until symptoms of hepatic lipidosis start showing up--get to the vet ASAP.

We'll be sending purrs your way! Please keep us posted on your condition.

» There has since been 9 posts. Last posting by MuShu, Jul 2 7:41 am

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