Postings by Hunter

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Cat Health > Need Prayers Please
Hunter

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Purred: Tue Feb 2, '10 5:32pm PST 
I wonder if she is having difficulty getting into the litter box. You try putting down some newspaper with some litter sprinkled over the top to see if she'll use that. It's hard to say what may be going on. consulting with a neurologist may prove beneficial, even without an MRI. Maybe I missed it but did they do bloodwork and take xrays of the area? If not those things would be recommended. You could wait a few days and see if the Pred continues to help or consult w/ neuro asap. Has the vet ruled out polyarthritis as a possible cause? Purring for you!!!!!
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» There has since been 29 posts. Last posting by 13calicos, Feb 18 4:40 pm

Cat Health > Kitten/cat first aid kit
Hunter

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Purred: Tue Dec 15, '09 9:48pm PST 
http://www.avma.org/firstaid/supplies.asp

Phone numbers and your pet's medical record (including medications and vaccination history)

Veterinarian:

Emergency veterinary clinic:

Animal Poison Control Center:
888-4ANI-HELP (888-426-4435)(there may be a fee for this call)
You need to know these numbers before you need them. If you do not know the number of the emergency clinic in your area, ask your veterinarian or go to the Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society Web site for a searchable list of emergency clinics by state.
Gauze - for wrapping wounds or muzzling the injured animal
Nonstick bandages, towels, or strips of clean cloth -To control bleeding or protect wounds
Adhesive tape for bandages

*do NOT use human adhesive bandages (eg, Band-Aids®) on pets For securing the gauze wrap or bandage
Milk of magnesia
Activated charcoal - To absorb poison
Always contact your veterinarian or local poison control center before inducing vomiting or treating an animal for poison
Hydrogen peroxide (3%) - To induce vomiting
Always contact your veterinarian or local poison control center before inducing vomiting or treating an animal for poison
Digital Thermometer—you will need a "fever" thermometer because the temperature scale of regular thermometers doesn't go high enough for pets To check your pet's temperature. Do not insert a thermometer in your pet's mouth—the temperature must be taken rectally.
Eye dropper (or large syringe without needle)- To give oral treatments or flush wounds
Muzzle (in an emergency a rope, necktie, soft cloth, nylon stocking, small towel may be used) To cover your pet's head. If your pet is vomiting, do not muzzle it!
Leash To transport your pet (if your pet is capable of walking without further injury)
Stretcher (in an emergency a door, board, blanket or floor mat may be used) To stabilize the injured animal and prevent further injury during transport
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Hunter, Dec 15 9:48 pm


Cat Health > Lump on rear leg

Hunter

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Purred: Tue Dec 15, '09 9:39pm PST 
It's likely caused from the rabies vaccine. It's standard to give rabies vaccines in the right rear leg. After the leukemia vaccine it's the next likely to cause FSA (fibrosarcoma). However, if your vet used the feline only vaccine your chances are even less. Lumps from rabies vaccines are usually gone by w/in a couple months of receiving the a shot. IF it's getting larger or hasn't gone away in the next couple of weeks, I'd recommend getting it checked out.
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Lucy , Dec 16 6:23 pm


Cat Health > How long do cats with Wet FIP live and at what point do you PTS?

Hunter

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Purred: Wed Oct 21, '09 9:01pm PST 
cats with effusive FIP tend not to live very long...days to weeks once a diagnosis has be made (typically) If your kitty is lethargic, not eating or drinking, the it's probably time to euthanize.
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» There has since been 14 posts. Last posting by Amber, Dec 1 1:37 pm


Cat Health > Anyone have adverse reaction to FeLV vaccines?

Hunter

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Purred: Mon Oct 5, '09 10:35am PST 
You should be talking to your vet to let them know that you are having these types of reactions. Many of which are not uncommon Most cats will act like we do when we have the flu. They usually are better within 48 hours. Since you do foster cats then you should continue getting the vaccines but maybe you can be put on an every 3 year schedule. Also NEVER get more than 1 vaccine at a time. Space them out by 2-3 weeks.
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Hunter, Oct 5 10:35 am

Cat Health > Do you clean your cats teeth?
Hunter

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Purred: Mon Sep 28, '09 6:42pm PST 
I disagree. Some of the medical problems 9you don't list them so I can't say for sure) could be caused by the bad teeth. A blood panel will tell your vet whether or not anesthesia is advisable or not.
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» There has since been 6 posts. Last posting by , Sep 29 9:32 pm


Cat Health > vaccinating a new kitten

Hunter

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Purred: Mon Sep 28, '09 11:38am PST 
Vaccines should start at 8 weeks unless the kitten was taken from it's mother earlier than that and then they should start at 6 weeks. You should gt vaccinated every 3 weeks until 4 months of age when you receive your Rabies vaccine (make sure its the cat only vaccine). You should NEVER get more than 1 vaccine at a time (space them by a couple of weeks. (This is coming directly out of the mouth of an internal medicine specialist).

Here is the protocol UC Davis recommends:
Age Vaccine
6-9 weeks FVRCP
9-12 weeks FVRCP, FeLV
12-14 weeks FVRCP, FeLV
12 weeks Rabies

1) Kittens should receive FVRCP at 3-4 week intervals until the age of 12-14 weeks. Vaccination of kittens less than 6 weeks of age is not recommended. Adult cats ( > 6 months old) with no known vaccination history, regardless of age, should receive 1 dose of FVRCP. A booster vaccination should follow 1 year later, then at 3-year intervals.

2) Kittens should receive 2 doses of the FeLV vaccine. The first dose should be at 9 weeks of age or older. The second dose should follow 3-4 weeks after the first dose (i.e., at 9 weeks, then at 12 weeks of age). Booster vaccinations should be given 1 year later, then at 3-year intervals. FeLV vaccine is not recommended for cats kept strictly indoors. FeLV vaccine is recommended for all cats allowed to roam outdoors.

Cats previously vaccinated with other FeLV vaccines and requiring a booster immunization will only need to receive a single immunization with the product used by the VMTH. Adult cats not previously vaccinated for FeLV should receive the two-dose primary immunization series. Booster vaccinations should follow after 1 year, then at 3-year intervals.

3) Rabies vaccination is recommended for all at-risk cats and where it is required by law. The vaccination regimen is the same as for dogs, i.e., initial immunization, a booster 1 year later, and subsequent re-vaccinations at 3-year intervals.

4. Chlamydia vaccine - This vaccine is a poor immunogen in that immunity is not long lasting nor does it provide complete protection against either the disease or the carrier state. Adverse vaccine reactions may be more severe in vaccines containing Chlamydia. We do not stock Chlamydia vaccine.
5. Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) vaccine - This is a modified live virus product given intranasally starting at 16 weeks of age, with a second dose 3 weeks or more later. There is literature suggesting the use of the vaccine to reduce FECV if given at 16 weeks of age or older to coronavirus seronegative cats. However, the efficacy of the vaccine for this purpose is low, as for prevention of FIP. More than 3/4 of FIP cases occur among kittens and younger cats up to 3 years of age originating from large breeding catteries or shelters, with death losses approaching 5%. In contrast, the incidence among household pet cats is less than 1hi5000. Therefore, vaccination is economically justified only in the large multiple cat households, which have the highest incidence of FIP. Unfortunately, independent studies have shown a lack of efficacy when used as directed in highly coronavirus endemic environments, i.e., most large catteries. Because routine vaccination of household pet cats is not economically justified, and vaccination within coronavirus endemic large multiple cat households is ineffective, the vaccine has limited application.
6. Bordetella vaccine - ornasal live vaccine, given to kittens or older cats. The extent of Bordetella as a clinical problem in catteries and shelters is not known, but routine use in household cats is not recommended. The use of the vaccine in large multi-cat environments should be conditioned on need.
7. Ringworm vaccine - ringworm vaccines have been used on affected cats to decrease the severity and duration of signs. We do not recommend their use in cats.
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Gracie, Sep 28 11:47 am


Cat Health > Important re: Insulin shots

Hunter

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Purred: Mon Sep 28, '09 11:25am PST 
You should always be sure that your cat has eaten something before administering the insulin. Even if Butterscotch grazes throughout the day, a small amount of food in the am should suffice. I'd call your vet for their recommendations since they have your medical history on file.
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Hunter, Sep 28 11:25 am


Cat Health > Do you clean your cats teeth?

Hunter

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Purred: Mon Sep 28, '09 11:24am PST 
Brushing your cats teeth when they are covered in tarter will do nothing. You need to have the teeth professionally cleaned. This would require anesthesia and on a 12 year old cat blood work should be performed before anesthetizing her.
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» There has since been 10 posts. Last posting by , Sep 29 9:32 pm

Cat Health > Scab Between Shoulder Blades
Hunter

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Purred: Mon Sep 28, '09 11:22am PST 
Should could be scratching at the area to cause it to bleed and not heal. There could also be a secondary bacterial infection which would require antibiotics o clear it up. My advice, have a vet do a thorough exam on her.
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Hunter, Sep 28 11:22 am

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