Postings by Iba

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Behavior & Training > Am I abusing my kitty?
Iba

World's Best- Kitten- Socializer
 
 
Purred: Thu May 29, '14 11:28am PST 
Here's the deal. No one knows your cat better than you do. If you and Arwen are content with your arrangement, then it's no one else's business. I have a harness and leash and my mom takes me on walks around the neighborhood, on campus, and sometimes to PetCo to let me watch the birds. She's very good at reading my body language and she knows when I'm done. Just because it looks funny to some people doesn't mean it's bad and it certainly doesn't make it abuse.
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Iba, May 29 11:28 am

Cat Health > Cat Drinking Fountains.
Iba

World's Best- Kitten- Socializer
 
 
Purred: Wed Jan 15, '14 10:43am PST 
I just got a Pioneer Pet Big Max at half price on Amazon. It's stainless steel (the filter and motor housing is the only plastic part and it's hidden) and it holds 128 oz. of water which might be handy if the dog will also be partaking.
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Maus: DB #53!, Jan 27 2:33 pm


Cat Health > Mac is very sick

Iba

World's Best- Kitten- Socializer
 
 
Purred: Mon Jan 13, '14 1:19pm PST 
Out of curiosity, if Mac's liver enzymes are elevated, has your vet given him some fluids under the skin? The extra liquid (usually saline or lactated Ringer's) gives the liver an assist on flushing out toxins. We had an FIV-positive cat whose ALT level would get nearly 9 times the normal limit. He got fluids to help flush everything out. It would probably cut down on the work Mac's body is trying to do.
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» There has since been 24 posts. Last posting by Zoey, Mar 15 4:10 pm


Cat Health > Car sickness remedy?

Iba

World's Best- Kitten- Socializer
 
 
Purred: Sun Oct 27, '13 6:52pm PST 
If your cat is getting sick on short car rides, this is probably due to stress. A few things MIGHT help. First, let the cat get used to the carrier (and I really do recommend a carrier). Bring the carrier in and take the top off. Put a fresh towel and a little catnip or a toy or something in the bottom to make it more appealing. Let the cat get used to just the bottom half of the carrier. Once that's happened, put the top on but NOT the door. This way, the cat can go in and out as it pleases. Once they are comfortable that way, THEN put the door on. Let the cat sit in the carrier with the door latched for a few minutes at a time, then reward her when you let her out. Another thing to try would be some Feliway spray on whatever towel is in the bottom.

Now if it's long car rides, here's what I've tried with Iba. Iba used to get violently car sick from both ends. Rule #1--Fast the cat for at least 4-6 hours (I fast Iba for around 8). A cat with an empty stomach is less likely to get nausea and puke. There are anti-carsick meds for cats and dogs that can be given. We started with those, but Iba and I have been able to phase that out. What we still use is acepromazine as a sedative. Again, it takes a little experimentation to figure out how much is enough. Iba is typically good on a half a pill for a 5 hour car ride (our longest thus far), but if he's had a particularly stressful day (a trip to the vet for example), I'll give him a whole pill. The one day I had to do this, I'm glad I did as we hit a deer on the highway and if he hadn't been stoned out of his mind, he would have freaked out. But test with a small amount and work your way up. Also, keep in mind that some cats start to sing like canaries when they are sedated.
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» There has since been 4 posts. Last posting by QGM Harlequin (Striped Seven), Oct 28 1:40 pm


Cat Health > Considering a Special Needs Cat

Iba

World's Best- Kitten- Socializer
 
 
Purred: Fri Oct 25, '13 11:40am PST 
Make sure you talk to folks in the rescue who have been working with the cat. They should have some insight. Ask who has been seeing the cat for veterinary care and if you don't already have a vet, you might consider staying with that vet since they have already seen him. Most rescues are great about "after care" or being a resource, especially for owners of special needs cats because they want the human/cat match to be a successful one, so you should expect a lot of support from the rescue. Also, do your research. With a special needs cat, you, as the owner, have to be the cat's biggest advocate. And with that job, knowledge is power, so the more information you have about what to expect with Manx syndrome (which has to do with an inability of some Manx cats to control their anal sphincter because of incomplete nerve formation at the base of the tail) the better off you'll be and the more successful you'll be.

But aside from that, I say go for it! Special needs cats are fabulous and very appreciative of the love and affection they get. Best of luck to you.
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» There has since been 3 posts. Last posting by TGM Gimli DB #101a, Oct 26 10:12 am

Cats and a Clean Home > How best to transition an outdoor cat to an indoor?
Iba

World's Best- Kitten- Socializer
 
 
Purred: Sun Oct 13, '13 6:27am PST 
See, the trick is making him THINK he's getting what he wants. There are a few ways to do this. First, if you haven't tried him with a harness, DO IT! It will take some cats longer to get used to a harness than others, but some (like Iba) take to it right away. If he will take to a harness, you can take him for walks which fulfills his desire to be outside but puts you in control of his outdoor time. Iba was doing the same thing this summer (yowling incessantly at the front door), but he walks fabulously on a leash and harness, and it's helped him enormously.

Second--if you have a back porch (some do, some don't, but this has always been my dream), and it's not screened in, I'd seriously think about it. The windows/screening (however you decide to go) should be pretty sturdy since cats love to climb screens if given the opportunity. This would allow him to be "outside" without actually being outside.

Third--wherever there are windows that look out at interesting parts of the outside world, encourage him to hang out there. If there's a tree outside of a front window where birds like to congregate, put a perch or a bed or a cat tree or something there so he can enjoy the sights in the comfort and protection of home.

As for the yowling and pacing, again, I dealt with this with Iba this summer. I put a Feliway diffuser in our entryway and one next to Iba's favorite napping spot. The change in his behavior was quick and noticeable. Also, if you can find a toy that your cat really digs, try to play with him really hard a couple of times a day and tire him out. A sleeping cat cares far less about outisde time. I recommend something like "Da Bird" which allows him to get in touch with his natural hunting instinct.
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Midas, Oct 17 11:03 am


Behavior & Training > Any product that works to prevent peeing on furniture ?!

Iba

World's Best- Kitten- Socializer
 
 
Purred: Thu Oct 10, '13 8:57am PST 
Step one: Take Misha to the vet. If this is new behavior and Misha has never peed in places she isn't supposed to before, rule out health issues. Because cats can't talk, they have to tell us in other ways that something's wrong. If it hurts to pee, they find all sorts of creative ways to let us know.

Step two: How many litter boxes do you have for your 3 cats? If the answer is less than three, that could be part of the problem. If Misha was cornered in a litter box or if the box is too small/too dirty/etc, she might be expressing her discontent. As a corollary to this, have you changed litter lately? Cats are creatures of habit (some more than others) and may not appreciate a change in litter.

Step three: If the problem is not health related or box related, there are some things you can do. First, use an Oxi-Clean-type product that has the power to break down the urine smell so that Misha doesn't keep going back to the same place again. There are all sorts of great products on the market--I'm partial to the Nature's Miracle Oxy Action cleaner. Invest in a Feliway diffuser or two. Put one near Misha's favorite napping spot and one near the offending sofa. Also, look at your house from a cat's perspective. Is there something that is stressing her out? Maybe an outside noise or a neighborhood cat walking by that is making her insecure. If so, try to mitigate that. Another thing to do is play with Misha. It will reinforce your bond, reduce her stress level, and tire her out so that she doesn't have the energy to pee in places she shouldn't be.
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by ღ misha ღ, Oct 10 5:57 pm


Behavior & Training > Terrified that indoor-only cat will escape outside after move from apt to house

Iba

World's Best- Kitten- Socializer
 
 
Purred: Mon Oct 7, '13 11:52am PST 
There are a couple of ways you can go here--one is to train him that the door is bad and inside is good. The second is to introduce him to the great outdoors on YOUR terms.

Option 1--Get a Feliway diffuser or two and put one next to his favorite napping spot and one by the front door. This will help calm him down. Second, when you get ready to go somewhere, give him food or treats or a favorite toy or something to show him that inside is really the best place for him. Third, make the door seem like an unappealing place. Spray bottles are great for this. Keep a spray bottle near the door and spray him if he gets too close. Eventually, he'll stop coming close.

Option 2--Use a harness and a leash (some cats get used to these VERY easily, others...not so much). Once the cat is willing to stand up straight (not bowing or arching his back or trying to get out of the harness), hook him up to the leash and let him out on the front porch. Let him sniff and explore and look around. If he seems like he wants to go for a walk, let him walk for a while. This way, if he is outside, he understands that it's on YOUR terms, but that if he cooperates, your terms aren't so bad....
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Iba, Oct 7 11:52 am


Cats and a Clean Home > Cat litter spread out

Iba

World's Best- Kitten- Socializer
 
 
Purred: Mon Sep 30, '13 9:12am PST 
Try a bigger litter box--even if you have to be creative. The big, clear storage bins at Wal-Mart are a great alternative. Cut a door in one end (you can even put it up a little higher if you feel like you need to), and fill it with litter. Might take more litter, but it's got nice high sides, an open top, and you can custom fit the door so it's a little higher than in a normal litter box. Plus, with as big as these are, it means a boisterous cat who likes to cover...and cover...and cover their litter is more likely to keep the litter in the box than fling it everywhere.
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» There has since been 3 posts. Last posting by Pandora, Oct 2 5:12 pm

Behavior & Training > He's spraying! Help!
Iba

World's Best- Kitten- Socializer
 
 
Purred: Mon Sep 2, '13 11:25am PST 
There are any number of ways you can help Hunter. Pickles has already touched on a couple of them. Invest in a Feliway diffuser and put it in an outlet close to the patio door where he can see other cats. If there is a TNR (trap, neuter, return) program in your area, contact them to set out some traps. They will neuter those cats, then return them to the neighborhood, but being neutered, they will be much less likely to spray around your house. If Hunter is amenable to wearing a harness and walking on a leash, you might try taking him for walks around the neighborhood so he can feel more secure about his ownership of "his" neighborhood.

As for the stains and the smell, any good oxygenated cleaner works. Plain Oxi-Clean and hot water works. I'm partial to the Nature's Miracle Oxi-Clean type spray that's specifically for cat odors. It works like a charm on urine, feces, blood, and all sorts of other organic pet stains and odors.
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» There has since been 5 posts. Last posting by Hunter *Dreamboat #82*, Sep 7 6:09 am

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