Postings by Leo

GO!

(Page 1 of 6: Viewing entries 1 to 10)  
Page Links: 1  2  3  4  5  6  

Behavior & Training > Cat introductions
Leo

purrrr
 
 
Purred: Thu Aug 30, '12 4:10pm PST 
I've never had this exact thing happen, of course. But we have been through a few introductions and I don't think anything is "ruined." I'd maybe back up a step and keep going slow. It sounds like you are doing a great job.
[notify]

» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Leo, Aug 30 4:10 pm

Choosing the Right Cat > should I choose a 1 yr old or a kitten?
Leo

purrrr
 
 
Purred: Thu Aug 30, '12 2:41pm PST 
There are so many dynamics involved in how well Daniel would accept the new cat or kitten. If you feel a connection with the one yr old and she has a reputation of getting along with other cats, I'd go for it. (I'd just make sure she doesn't get along with them by totally dominating them....might not be a good mixture with Daniel.) We just decided to foster (and hopefully adopt) a 6 yr old female cat. It is amazing how non-threatening she is to the other cats. She just wants to be friends. Kittens have a reputation for being a non-threatening choice but in our case an adult is probably just as good.

Of course the big advice you will read is go slow with the introductions, whatever the age of the newbie. Good luck with the decision.
[notify]

» There has since been 6 posts. Last posting by Daniel, Sep 8 3:13 pm


Cat Health > Regurgitating food

Leo

purrrr
 
 
Purred: Sat Aug 18, '12 3:04pm PST 
Yes, after over a year of living here and never throwing up, Leo here started doing the exact same thing as your kitty, exactly twice a week. He showed no other signs of illness. When it lasted over a month I figured it couldn't be a hairball. We went to the vet, who suggested a special food. But I wanted to try slowing him down some first. For him, slowing him down has done the trick. Poor thing....I pretty much just can't give him his favorite flavors anymore. He gobbles them down too fast. But, he likes the other things he eats too. I also adjusted his meal times a bit so he wouldn't be so hungry and wouldn't be served as much at one time.

If I thought the food was the issue, I wouldn't have used the food the vet recommended. I would have researched how to do an "elimination diet" which means eliminating certain things one at a time until you find what in the food they are reacting to.

A trip to the vet is a good idea, of course.
[notify]

» There has since been 4 posts. Last posting by Alex (sweet angel girl), Aug 19 12:55 pm


Kitten Corner > possibly a new kitten with string attached..

Leo

purrrr
 
 
Purred: Sat May 5, '12 2:31pm PST 
Leo's mom here. Personally, I have a horrible fear of spraying (haven't experienced it yet thank goodness) and will always have males neutered at 4 months to try to prevent them maturing to the point they would spray. If you don't have other cats in the house the risk of spraying might not be as great. And maybe the thought doesn't strike fear in your heart like it does mine. But, that would probably be my main concern.
[notify]

» There has since been 8 posts. Last posting by , May 8 2:08 pm


Behavior & Training > My Cat Bites a lot & Chews Wired

Leo

purrrr
 
 
Purred: Tue Apr 24, '12 6:58am PST 
First, I would not listen to your vet's advice to pinch your cat. As much as we would like to think we could listen to anything our vet says about cats, sometimes they don't really know that much about behavior modification or nutrition. When our cats were younger and nipped us we would yell "Ouch" and redirect them to a toy.

I know it's a pain, but I would find some way to cat proof or hide the wires. They make covers for wires intended to shield them from pets. There are also other solutions, bitter sprays (but research thoroughly to make sure they won't harm your cat), motion detector sensors that spray a blast of air at the cat (called Ssscat), and other deterrent methods.

Also, there are toys made for cats that love chewing. Leo here is a chewer and likes the kitty kong toy we bought. If you google cat chew toys there are others, but read reviews for any safety problems.
[notify]

» There has since been 6 posts. Last posting by Samhain , Oct 17 5:12 am

Behavior & Training > Discussion: Is too much love a bad thing?
Leo

purrrr
 
 
Purred: Tue Apr 3, '12 6:44am PST 
Leo here can be very loud and persistent about requesting attention....especially in the morning when he has gone all night without it. It has crossed my mind that I've "spoiled" my kitties. But was it a mistake? NO! I think so many people don't enjoy their cats because they have never given them all the love and playtime they need and, therefore, don't get to see that the cats actually crave this. I'm glad for my spoiled kitties. I get to see how much they love the attention and pampering they get around here.

The people throwing pillows at their cats...why do they have cats if they don't want the cat to enjoy their company? shrug
[notify]

» There has since been 14 posts. Last posting by Memphis, May 21 10:11 am


Behavior & Training > Reintroducing cat to new kitten

Leo

purrrr
 
 
Purred: Tue Feb 21, '12 6:20am PST 
Sounds like you are doing the right thing with the supervised visits. To provide some encouragement, Leo also lived in isolation (for a month) yet there was still plenty of hissing from his "brother" Eko when he came out. It took a month for the hissing to die down, now they are good buddies. They even snuggle and groom each other at times. Good luck with your two boys.
[notify]

» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Leo, Feb 21 6:20 am


Cats and a Clean Home > Cat collars?

Leo

purrrr
 
 
Purred: Sat Feb 18, '12 8:16am PST 
None of the breakaway collars at petsmart worked for us. They broke away too easily and the cats could get out of them easily. We experimented with ones on the internet and found beastie bands to be the best with tuff lock being a close second. You are right that the ID would be lost if the collar came off outdoors but at least the cat would be safe. We have microchips as backups. (And our cats are 100% indoors.)
[notify]

» There has since been 14 posts. Last posting by Tutu, Apr 20 7:12 am


Cat Health > To soft paw or not to soft paw?

Leo

purrrr
 
 
Purred: Fri Jan 27, '12 11:05am PST 
Hi, Holly. Just our opinion, we'd wait to see if you have problems with the claws before soft pawing. (Just because of the extra expense and hassle of using them...plus the off chance that they could get snagged on something. We did read one review that stated their cat got her claw stuck in some lace because of them.) We keep the nails trimmed and trained the cats to use a scratching post and the claws aren't a problem. We have three one year old cats and 2 children in the house too. Only twice did I (Leo) scratch the 6 year old and both times he was in my face when he shouldn't have been. Mommy teaches the kids to respect our boundaries, but the 6 yr old got a litte carried away. We love the little humans though.

It is good that you are considering soft paws over declawing, of course. smile
[notify]

» There has since been 3 posts. Last posting by Rusty, Jan 29 8:42 am

Cat Health > Fungal infection (ringworm?)
Leo

purrrr
 
 
Purred: Thu Jan 26, '12 4:41pm PST 
Leo here had ringworm when we adopted him. It was a hard time for us. I'd definitely have the vet do a fungal culture to confirm things. If it is fungal, it spreads by spores so vacuuming as much as possible can help prevent the spread. Washing sheets, clothes etc...in the hottest water possible for the fabric also helps. There are some good websites out there, but it can be overwhelming to read about. Good luck.
[notify]

» There has since been 4 posts. Last posting by Natalie the Natcat, Forever, Feb 9 9:32 am

(Page 1 of 6: Viewing entries 1 to 10)  
Page Links: 1  2  3  4  5  6  

PLEASE NOTE: Due to the rapid nature of forum postings, it's quite possible our calculation of the number of ensuing forum posts may be off by one or two or more at any given moment.