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Plus Power of the Paw > Purrs and POTP for all in the path of Sandy
Samhain

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Purred: Tue Oct 30, '12 1:32pm PST 
Talked with Colette in NYC - they're fine and didn't lose power at all. We're in the Great Lakes area, and high winds and rain started yesterday - not sure if this was really related to Sandi as the wind appeared to be coming mostly from the west, and it's not too unusual for us to have high winds this time of year on our little "hill". Still wet, cold and very windy out there as I type this.
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» There has since been 41 posts. Last posting by Lacey, Nov 5 8:02 pm

Behavior & Training > Cat introduction update
Samhain

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Purred: Tue Oct 23, '12 6:19am PST 
This is a hard one to advise on, because we aren't there and can't see the severity of the attack. I will say that after watching our indoor girls and, especially the outdoor ferals in our colony here, the vocal stuff sounds absolutely horrible, but then we'll see "the victim" a short time later looking completely unscathed. Sometimes they're even back shoulder to shoulder eating with the aggressor!
There is a lot of jockeying for alpha position in a household or colony. Crossing our fingers and paws, we'll say try them again, but have your spray bottle ready to spray the heck out of Grazie. And every time she corners Ladybug, spray her and scare her off, telling her calmly but firmly "NO!" You're the top Alpha Cat - let Grazie know this - hopefully that will get through to her.
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by , Oct 23 7:47 am


Behavior & Training > My Cat Bites a lot & Chews Wired

Samhain

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Purred: Wed Oct 17, '12 5:12am PST 
We also used bitter apple spray, which helped - but as was mentioned, after a certain time the behavior just stopped. Maybe it's a teething thing like human babies?
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by , Oct 17 5:12 am


Behavior & Training > Need Help w/ Introductions

Samhain

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Purred: Thu Oct 11, '12 5:59am PST 
I didn't answer yesterday when I saw this - was waiting for someone with more experience, but what the hey? We're kind of in the same boat at the moment (I'm posting in the question about INDOOR/OUTDOOR CATS VS INDOOR ONLY IN A MULTIPLE CAT HOUSEHOLD - might want to read what we've said so far).
Sounds like you're doing everything right. Two tips I thought of were the Feliway wall diffusers (AMAZON $20 or so), plus the simple trick of rubbing a towel, blankie or your hands over one and then over the others, anything to transfer scent from one to another. The dog is an unknown factor for us. These cats in our house now have never interacted with one, though once upon a time we had a small dog and a manx cat at the same time. The dog was afraid of the manx!smile
How are things going today?
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» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by Tora, Oct 16 10:19 am


Behavior & Training > Introducting a new cat

Samhain

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Purred: Tue Oct 9, '12 1:35pm PST 
I'm not usually around on the forums either, but as I posted a question myself, I happened to see yours.
When we brought Fearless in the house, we also used the Feliway diffuser which seemed to help; but I gather that's what your calming collar is. From what you've said, it sounds like things are progressing in a fairly positive way. We DID segregate Fearless for a week, but partly because she had a respiratory infection when we took her in, and we wanted her to get her treatment before we introduced her to the others. There was the hissing and swatting with our crew, too. This went on for some months, but not too much very aggressive fighting. In some ways, now that everyone has settled in together (it's been a little less than a year), the occasional fights are a little more aggressive now - usual led into by rough play and chase that get out of hand. We think this is because Fearless is no longer a kitten and has developed a more dominant personality than she had before. But for the most part, the three girls get along well enough, though Fearless is often excluded from the closeness that the two older girls share. Which leads to our own situation of possibly including a fourth cat - hoping that, as the odd man out, he would bond with Fearless.
I'd say in your situation, give it a while longer and keep the spray bottle handy. Try to keep them separate when you're around. I know when we leave for work we can't be there to watch, but if you hold off feeding or if you give another little snack right before you go, they may feel drowsy enough to sleep through the day while you're gone. We'll try to remember to check back and see how things are going!cheer
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Ladybug, Oct 9 1:56 pm

Behavior & Training > INDOOR/OUTDOOR CATS MIXED WITH INDOOR ONLY IN A MULTIPLE CAT HOUSEHOLD
Samhain

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Purred: Tue Oct 9, '12 12:58pm PST 
We'll have to keep the microchip in mind if we go through with this, though I'd be a little worried about the ingenuity of Samhain and Fearless at getting past it's security! Probably we'd just leave it that he had to ask to go out and come in again. We let him in the door for a brief moment; he took one turn around the room and bolted back to the door. Meanwhile, we're working on new winter cubbyholes for the porch... big grin
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by , Oct 9 12:58 pm


Behavior & Training > INDOOR/OUTDOOR CATS MIXED WITH INDOOR ONLY IN A MULTIPLE CAT HOUSEHOLD

Samhain

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Purred: Tue Oct 9, '12 5:50am PST 
Thanks for the input, Tao! The coyotes are a concern here, too. We're pretty sure the last cat we had before we took in these three [and adopted a whole freakin' outdoor colony!!! - even longer story smile], was killed by coyotes. This was a good part of the reason why we decided from the beginning not to allow free outdoor access, and our first two kitties had been brought in so early as well, we figured they wouldn't be wise to the ways of survival. The third one was sickly in the beginning and didn't WANT to go out. The declawing would definitely be a handicap for your Acorn, and we're in agreement that a week may not be long enough to make him feel your home is his home. We'd be doing the same as you, I'm sure. Later, you might try introducing him to leash-walking. They make small harnesses that allow a little more security. We probably wouldn't have even considered the leashes if we were in the city, but the country allows for walking in the grass away from cars and other people. We've got lots of pics of us out walking in case that sounds like something you'd like to try. It took a little getting used to, but now we're pretty good.wink
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» There has since been 3 posts. Last posting by , Oct 9 12:58 pm


Behavior & Training > INDOOR/OUTDOOR CATS MIXED WITH INDOOR ONLY IN A MULTIPLE CAT HOUSEHOLD

Samhain

1172733
 
 
Purred: Mon Oct 8, '12 10:35am PST 
Am divided on an issue: we have three indoor cats, all originally ferals, though one has been inside since she was a week old and the other since 5 weeks, while the youngest didn’t get taken in till she was around 3 months. They have a 100 ft cattery for controlled outdoor time, and all get leash time - the older two are fine walkers! We also care for a feral colony which eats (and, in some cases, sleeps on our porch), and who have all been spayed or neutered and re-released (except one and her kittens – working on it…).
One of the ferals - Socks, is a neutered male, rescued from an abandoned building as a kitten and, for lack of a better arrangement at the time, transported to live in the feral shelter we built for the local colony. He has become a very affectionate and personable cat; possibly the most even-tempered cat I’ve ever been acquainted with, including our indoor “fur-children”! Now that winter is just around the corner, there is some thought of letting him come inside. It was out of the question last winter (though we did make an initial attempt); we had to put the welfare of the others ahead of him, plus our own needs in not increasing the stress level in a small house.
These last two thoughts are still of great importance, but the question is this: has anyone ever successfully maintained a household of multiple cats in which some cats were allowed indoor/outdoor status, while others had indoor only? We do not want to force indoor-only status on a feral who has been living outside for over a year now. In truth, he has had a very good life up to this point: 2 meals a day, some limited medical treatment (I have more than a few times given wormer and antibiotics, mixed in their food, as prescribed by a local vet who works with the mobile spay clinic), daily love and attention, and outdoor interaction with his fellow ferals, plus our indoor girls when we walk them on their leashes. If he came inside, he would have all the privileges and extra attention and treatment that they receive, but we would feel obliged to let him come and go. We welcome all thoughts, though we want to point out that we are pretty well maxed-out as far as funds go with these cats. We can’t afford much more than what we’re presently doing.
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» There has since been 5 posts. Last posting by , Oct 9 12:58 pm


Catster Lifestyle, News & Entertainment > Cartoon reruns

Samhain

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Purred: Tue Sep 4, '12 7:16am PST 
Hehehehe - good one, Raza! We are all fascinated with the whole grocery bag thing at our house, too - no telling what treasures are in there!happy dance
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» There has since been 4 posts. Last posting by , Sep 4 1:49 pm

Behavior & Training > i want to sleeeeppp
Samhain

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Purred: Tue Feb 28, '12 5:38am PST 
We went through all of this with Sleeper and Samhain while they were kittens - a lo-o-o-ng process since we took them in when they were 1 week old (Sleeper) and, then 5 weeks old (Samhain). We did the whole bit of encouraging play earlier in the evening and then feeding the last meal late. However, as soon as the lights went out, the games would REALLY begin! High speed action movie, fur sure! FINALLY, they apparently grew out of it and would sleep at night, or at least be quiet while we were sleeping. Then we brought in another young feral, Fearless. She is almost 7 months old and has pretty much calmed down at night now. This morning, though - and most mornings - she was up and in my face at 6:30 and then chasing Sleeper highspeed through the house. Who needs an alarm clock???
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Einstein, Mar 1 3:37 pm

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