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Cats and a Clean Home > Major flaw with Tidy Cats Breeze litter boxes!

Snowflake

1314105
 
 
Purred: Thu May 15, '14 12:44pm PST 
I think it really depends on your cat(s) and individual situation. We have used the Breeze since day one with Snowflake and haven't had a single problem. We haven't had a noticeable urine smell at all. I give the box a good cleaning when I empty the pellets at the end of the month - basically just a hot soapy water rinse and scrub with a brush. Yes it stinks when she soils it, but any liter box stinks in that situation until you scoop. We just have the one cat so scooping right away or as soon as we come home isn't a problem. For the pellets and pads you can do a little better if you shop around. There are places on Amazon that sell both the pellets and the pads in bulk and they're considerably cheaper than buying individual packages at the pet store. A 6-pack of pellets is of course pretty heavy but if you have Amazon Prime the shipping is free. I buy 10-packs of the pad refills (10 packages of 4 for a total of 40 pads) and also save a little money there.

I could definitely see issues with Breeze for multi-cat households. They recommend that you have one more box than the number of cats in your home, so if you have 2 cats that's 3 boxes and the maintenance costs can add up pretty quickly in that case. For single cat households you're fine with a single box as long as you stay on top of the scooping.
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Snowflake, May 15 12:44 pm

Rescue, Adoption & Happy Endings > Rescue Cat - In or Out Tonight
Snowflake

1314105
 
 
Purred: Tue Dec 17, '13 1:51pm PST 
Sounds like it could get a little chilly in there for her. I'm still learning how to be a "cat person" myself, but maybe bring her in on the colder nights and isolate her to a small room like a bathroom, and provide food and a litter box there?

We were in a similar position as you except without the cold (we live in Southern California where "cold" means 50 degrees). When we decided to adopt Snowflake she was going to be a full-time outdoor cat because of my wife's allergies, but then when we took her to the vet to get spayed we were told to keep her inside for 10 days, which caught us completely off guard. We were expecting a day or two but not 10! Long story short she ended up doing extremely well indoors, and my wife got some good pointers from a nurse friend about dealing with the allergies, so all is well and we now have a full-time (and very happy) indoor kitty.
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Snowflake, Dec 17 1:51 pm


Food & Nutrition > Can Anyone Suggest a Good Auto Feeder that Works?

Snowflake

1314105
 
 
Purred: Fri Dec 13, '13 2:51pm PST 
I bought a Wireless Whiskers feeder for Snowflake. You can read her profile page for the background, but basically she was a stray/abandoned pet who showed up on our doorstep starving to death and we decided to adopt her. My wife is asthmatic and allergic to cats, so initially we thought we'd make her an outdoor cat and just come up with a feeding solution for her and she'd show up at meal times for food and petting/brushing. We have a lot of stray and feral cats in the neighborhood so we wanted to make sure only Snowflake had access to the food, which was a bit tricky. The Wireless Whiskers feeder worked very well for doing just that. It has doors that are RFID activated, so you have to put a small tag on the cat's collar for it to work. It's actually a pretty slick system. For the first week it monitors how much the cat eats, then sets a daily food allowance based on that (or you can manually set an allowance). You can either have the doors open all the time and close when the cat has reached its daily food allowance, or keep them closed and open them only when the cat is at the feeder (unless it's eaten its full allowance for the day). It was pretty funny - we had a bunch of very frustrated feral cats on our patio wondering why they could see and smell food but couldn't get to it.

Since we bought the feeder, one thing has lead to another and now Snowflake is a 100% indoor cat, so we aren't using the auto feeder anymore. I haven't decided if I'm going to keep it or try to sell it on Craigslist or eBay. It might still come in handy for an occasional overnight or weekend trip. It's a little pricey at $150 or so but I can see it being very handy for some people.
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by ♥ Roxy ♥, Jan 4 8:08 pm


Cats and a Clean Home > Does the kitty litter type actually have an importance for cats?

Snowflake

1314105
 
 
Purred: Mon Dec 9, '13 1:36pm PST 
I recently rescued a cat that just showed up on my doorstep hungry. I haven't had a cat in more than 25 years and the last ones I had were indoor/outdoor cats who came and went as they pleased, so I started off pretty much as a rookie. When I went to buy a litter box I was overwhelmed at the number of styles of boxes and types of litter that were available. It was almost as bad as shopping for baby gear with a full aisle of litter and related products at PetSmart.

After my initial deer in the headlights feeling, I did a little research and ended up taking home the Tidy Cats Breeze system. It's a bit unconventional - it's not sand-like at all. It has these coarse cylindrical pellets so it's more like fine gravel. The concept is that the liquids pass straight through the pellets and collect in an absorbant pad at the bottom of the box. The pad is kind of like a diaper and lasts about a week. Solid waste stays in the top and you scoop that out as needed.

I'm happy to report that the system is working quite well for our cat. She took to using it right away without any prompting. There is no smell, except of course the once or sometimes twice a day when she makes a solid deposit. That can be quite noticeable but we just go scoop that and toss it into a litter genie and everything's good to go. I've actually been quite impressed by how well it's been doing the job.

Like anything else it has its pros and cons. Pros are no tracking of litter, no dust, no cat urine smells. Cons are it's perhaps a little bit more expensive than some other types of litter (about $10 for a bag of pellets that lasts a month, and $8 for a 4-pack of pads, so once you own the system you have a maintenance cost of about $4.50 per week). I've also read that some cats who are accustomed to more conventional litter may have trouble switching over to Breeze. To me though, the pros outweigh the cons. Paying $4.50 a week to not have cat urine smells in my home is a small price.
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» There has since been 4 posts. Last posting by , Mar 18 3:59 pm


Rescue, Adoption & Happy Endings > "Cat rookie" family rescued a kitty - lots of questions

Snowflake

1314105
 
 
Purred: Fri Dec 6, '13 8:33pm PST 
Update: Snowflake is doing much better - getting a lot more active and playful like a normal kitty. I think it was combination of the surgery and being undernourished before we adoptedher, so her recovery took a little longer than normal. That, and her transition from outdoor cat to indoor cat and adjusting to new surroundings all at the same time. I thing we have a very happy, and very lucky, kitty.
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Snowflake, Dec 6 8:33 pm

Rescue, Adoption & Happy Endings > "Cat rookie" family rescued a kitty - lots of questions
Snowflake

1314105
 
 
Purred: Mon Dec 2, '13 2:27pm PST 
I'm still trying to figure out how to get my account profile set up properly, but I did upload one pic of her to her profile (with the e-collar waiting to be fed in the morning. She looks so pathetic! That's probably how she ended up getting adopted! laugh out loud http://www.catster.com/cats/1314105

Thanks again for the advice. She gets her stitches out and the e-collar off on Friday, so hopefully her activity will pick back up then.
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Snowflake, Dec 6 8:33 pm


Rescue, Adoption & Happy Endings > "Cat rookie" family rescued a kitty - lots of questions



Member Since
11/30/2013
 
 
Purred: Sat Nov 30, '13 2:10pm PST 
Yes, the vet gave her a clean bill of health. She's up to normal weight now and no signs of worms or any diseases. I don't really think she's feral. Based on her behavior and demeanor I really believe she's an abandoned pet. If not, then she's an extremely smart kitty! Right off the bat she has acted like she knows her way around the inside of a home. The litter box thing totally blew us away. She knew exactly what that was for right from the get go. She's also very affectionate and sweet. She purrs a lot. Any time someone approaches her she mews, starts purring, and rolls over on her back. I'm beginning to wonder if it's a combination of recovering from the surgery and finding herself in a completely new environment. She was a 100% outdoor kitty right up until a couple hours before her spay appointment. She hasn't really asked to go outside much either. The first day home from the vet she'd go to the door and mew a little bit but she hasn't done that since.

Thanks for your advice on the toys and cat tree. We will keep trying things with her and see what sticks. We've tried various beds as well and she turned her nose up at them. Her favorite spot is just a simple purr pad which right now is sitting on top of a cardboard box.

I should also add that she's wearing an e-collar right now, which I know is bugging her. I don't know if that's de-motivating her from being more active or not. She does tend to bump into a lot of stuff whenever she's up and about.
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» There has since been 4 posts. Last posting by Snowflake, Dec 6 8:33 pm


Rescue, Adoption & Happy Endings > "Cat rookie" family rescued a kitty - lots of questions



Member Since
11/30/2013
 
 
Purred: Sat Nov 30, '13 9:32am PST 
Hello,

A few weeks ago we had a kitty show up on our doorstep begging for food. Poor thing was literally skin and bones, but she was so friendly and had such a sweet personality that she stole our hearts, and we decided to adopt her even though my wife is allergic to cats. At first we thought we'd get her spayed and let her be an outdoor kitty. She learned when we left in the mornings and always showed up for breakfast, and she was always waiting for us when we got home in the evenings. She was outdoor only for about 3 weeks until we could get her to the vet for a health checkup and spay. Then of course we had to keep her indoors while she recovered from the surgery.

We're currently 4 days post-spay, and we're discovering that she's such a well-behaved kitty that we're contemplating keeping her indoors full time. We've found a few ways around the allergy problems (we have 100% wood floors in our home, and we keep her off of the upholstered furniture and out of our bedroom and so far so good). We were also very surprised that we had NO litterbox training issues whatsoever. We just made a litterbox available to her and she has used it without fail without any prompting from us. She also responds to a firm "no" - if she starts to climb up on the couch one "no" does the job. This all leads me to believe that she may have been an indoor kitty before someone decided to let her go. Either that or she's just a very mild mannered stray, but from everything I've read that would be very unusual. The vet estimated her age at 7 - 8 months due to the condition of her teeth.

I had cats as a child but they were always indoor/outdoor cats who came and went as they pleased through the pet door. I guess times have changed since then - everything I've read now say keep your cats indoors 24/7, and I don't have a problem with that based on how well she's done as an indoor kitty so far. I do have a few questions though...

- Ever since her spay operation, she has been mostly sedentary. She has her favorite spot that she likes to lay/sit in to sleep or groom herself. She'll get up and spend 5 minutes walking around and exploring, then go back to her spot. We've bought her various types of toys but she hasn't really shown any interest in them, and hasn't been playful at all. Is this normal for a post-spay cat, or will she return to more "normal" activity at some point? Problem is I don't really know what "normal" is for her since I don't know her full history, but it seems to me that she's still a kitten and she should be a lot more playful.

- What other things should I be doing to make the home more stimulating for her? She's getting lots of attention, but other than crawling into someone's lap to be petted she doesn't seem interested in much else. I'm a little concerned about her not getting enough exercise, or maybe she misses the great outdoors?

I'd appreciate any advice!
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» There has since been 6 posts. Last posting by Snowflake, Dec 6 8:33 pm

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