Postings by Margaux Hemingway's Family

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Rescue, Adoption & Happy Endings > I just got here, and need some help
Margaux- Hemingway

It's all about- me, and always- was!
 
 
Purred: Wed Dec 3, '08 5:27pm PST 
Have your mother switch around blankets and towels between you and Greta so that she can get used to your smell without having to physically confront you. She might just need a good bit of time to get used to you and tell you who is in charge by slapping you around a little. As long as there are no injuries and no one is hiding/not eating in avoidance of the other, she should come around and at least tolerate you peacefully.

As for the food, your vet might be able to give you an answer. You might have worms, which will definitely make you constantly hungry. Or you might just think you have to eat everything in sight because of your previous home situation where being home did not mean regular meals. It could really take a while for you to adjust, so your mother will need to police you on this. If it turns out you are underweight, you can probably get some Nutri-Cal to supplement your diet.
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» There has since been 4 posts. Last posting by Daniel, Dec 5 9:21 pm

Behavior & Training > I have tried everything to stop her from scratching - HELP!
Margaux- Hemingway

It's all about- me, and always- was!
 
 
Purred: Wed Nov 26, '08 8:02am PST 
Bebe is onto a good point. Cats won't scratch a post that isn't in a high-traffic area. Also, it needs to be tall enough for her to stretch aaaaaaall the way up, and heavy enough that she can't pull it over when she pulls on it really hard. Also, there is a spray called bitter apple that might deter her if sprayed on her scratching areas.

I've also heard that wallpaper is a big temptation for cats because little dimples appear and seams separate as it gets older and dries out.

I also suggest providing scratching surfaces that can be shredded and destroyed like the wallpaper. Corrugated cardboard is a good one. The Turbo Scratcher or Star Chaser toy has a cardboard ring in the middle that my destruct-o-cat goes nuts for, and you can buy replacements. Some cats love to play in and shred paper grocery bags. Could you affix some cardboard or a sack to a door or other non-wallpapered surface to provide her an alternative?
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» There has since been 5 posts. Last posting by Beatrice (Miss You! '94-'12), Dec 4 7:53 pm


Behavior & Training > Bed-wetting or lack of toilet training?

Margaux- Hemingway

It's all about- me, and always- was!
 
 
Purred: Mon Nov 24, '08 6:58am PST 
Even when they know to go in a litterbox, they may not have the control to make it in time yet. Also, they might not "feel" that they need to go until it is too late to make it to the box, and they might not have the brain capacity to remember where the closest box is. Try putting them all in a box every couple of hours. Also, it would probably help to restrict their roaming somewhat. That way they can't get too far away from a litterbox.
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» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by SWEETPEA-round eyed rumpy Manx, Nov 24 5:26 pm


Behavior & Training > PLEASE- any recs for an animal behaviorist in NY?

Margaux- Hemingway

It's all about- me, and always- was!
 
 
Purred: Thu Nov 20, '08 9:06am PST 
I don't live in NY, but a Google search can give you the names of organizations of animal behaviorists, and you should be able to get some contacts there. Have you asked your vet or anybody at a local shelter for recommendations? I would start with Google, Yellow Pages, and your local vets and shelters.
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Milla, Nov 20 12:12 pm


Behavior & Training > Waking up Mama at 3:30am

Margaux- Hemingway

It's all about- me, and always- was!
 
 
Purred: Wed Nov 19, '08 6:01pm PST 
I lock my cats out of the bedroom, and they screamed their heads off at first. I found locking them out was the only way to stop them fighting/running across the bed in the middle of the night, plus they were destroying my plants. Here's the method that worked for me to stop the screaming, although I know at least one other Catster tried it to no avail. It's worth a shot, but you do have to go ahead and sacrifice some sleep--you have to do that with ignoring her too though.

1) Stock cotton balls and rubbing alcohol or some other liquid with a powerful smell she hates near the bedroom door.

2) When she starts to claw and/or cry at the door, soak a cotton ball with the offensive liquid and shove it under the door crack.

3) DO NOT speak or fuss or open the door so she can see you--it MUST appear as if the bad smell just materializes out of nowhere.

It took about a week for mine to stop. They still meow in other parts of the house sometimes at night, but not right outside the door and not to get my attention. They start up around the time the alarm is supposed to go off, which I think is fine--they're just enforcing the routine, not being obnoxious.

GOOD LUCK!
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Taj, Dec 1 9:21 pm

Behavior & Training > Delilah is hiding and not eating.
Margaux- Hemingway

It's all about- me, and always- was!
 
 
Purred: Wed Nov 19, '08 2:34pm PST 
Poor Delilah! We hope you feel better! I slammed a door on Margaux's tail by accident and made it bleed. I was very worried it would develop into an abcess, but it never did. Puncture wounds on cats do that all too often, and of course they're so good at hiding minor hurts from us that we don't know something's wrong until something's REALLY wrong! Spider bites can also cause fever, a serious infection, and a big giant gross spot even when the spider wasn't poisonous.

Glad you've got some good oogey woogey meds to make you feel better!
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» There has since been 5 posts. Last posting by Delilah, Nov 27 8:12 am


Food & Nutrition > Need advice for calorie intake and weight loss.

Margaux- Hemingway

It's all about- me, and always- was!
 
 
Purred: Wed Nov 19, '08 2:21pm PST 
Have you tried feeding her 1/4 can and him 1/2 can simultaneously? If she isn't losing any weight at all, then reducing the food should help, but obviously you don't want to reduce the food on a healthy-weight cat.

How active is she? It may be that a run up and down a flight of stairs a few times a day will help. She might have a naturally lower metabolism, and exercise will help her out. It's surprising that the diet changes have had absolutely no effect. Is your husband feeding her treats or something, or is she getting in the garbage or stealing food from the siamese?

At any rate, I have one cat who will play "fetch" up and down the stairs with a fur mouse, and both will run after a laser pointer until they have to lie down. Whether or not you are able to reduce her food again, getting her moving should help her lose weight and contribute to her overall health.
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» There has since been 4 posts. Last posting by Angel, Nov 26 9:57 pm


Cat Health > Help!! It Hurts!!

Margaux- Hemingway

It's all about- me, and always- was!
 
 
Purred: Wed Nov 12, '08 5:39pm PST 
I agree with Boo Boo because it's possible for the cat to develop a blood infection when the open tissue is exposed to the infectious material. You really need to get to the vet. And you should only clean it with a salt water solution and then put neosporin on with a q-tip until then. No matter what you do though, this will most likely persist and get worse until it is treated with some kind of oral antibiotic, maybe an intravenous antibiotic depending on how bad the infection is.
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Margaux Hemingway, Nov 12 5:39 pm


Cat Health > Okay, REALLY weird question...

Margaux- Hemingway

It's all about- me, and always- was!
 
 
Purred: Wed Nov 12, '08 8:38am PST 
Is it also because they have so many more cycles per year than humans, and therefore the fluctuations that cause the cancers occur more frequently? Also, I didn't know the fatality rate was so high in cats and dogs--much higher than in humans. All the more reason to fix 'em!
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» There has since been 4 posts. Last posting by Lola, Nov 12 4:14 pm

Cat Health > Okay, REALLY weird question...
Margaux- Hemingway

It's all about- me, and always- was!
 
 
Purred: Wed Nov 12, '08 8:05am PST 
Since breast cancer is associated with different levels of the hormones estrogen and progesterone, I believe the decreased risk in cats after spaying probably has a lot more to do with the absence of hormone production than anything else. Most women who have hysterectomy have already lived for years, even decades, with typical hormone levels, so the surgery doesn't have the same effect. Pregnancy, birth and breast feeding seriously alter hormone levels for over a year of a woman's life. A year of atypical hormone levels is likely the reason women who have children have decreased risk of breast cancer. Not having periods, either because of pregnancy or some forms of birth control, also decreases women's risk of non-HPV cervical cancer and ovarian cancer. It's all about the hormones, from what I can tell.
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» There has since been 6 posts. Last posting by Lola, Nov 12 4:14 pm

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