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Food & Nutrition > Iams wet food recall
Aquavit

Queen of the- Mansion
 
 
Purred: Wed Jun 9, '10 3:05pm PST 
I was just coming here to post this. From the Pet Connection: Proctor & Gamble recall Iams canned cat foods
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» There has since been 5 posts. Last posting by OzzyCat, Jun 12 1:25 am

Cat Health > Can spayed cats still go in heat on occasion?
Retsina,- 1993-2010

Queen of the- Mansion- (retired)
 
 
Purred: Tue Jun 1, '10 10:54pm PST 
Retsina was very undersized due to malnutrition when I adopted her, and I was trying to wait for her to get a little larger before spaying her. She went into heat, and after several attempts to schedule her spay surgery, the vet finally told me to just wait for a day she wasn't in heat, fast her overnight, and call ahead the next morning to be sure they had room in the schedule that day.

One of the more frustrating ways in which cats aren't dogs. big grin
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Sasha 9/6/06-10/3/12, Jun 2 8:50 am


Food & Nutrition > New food needed

Aquavit

Queen of the- Mansion
 
 
Purred: Fri Feb 26, '10 10:19am PST 
Hi, Hobert! I guess you know my baby sister Addy, right? laugh out loud

I know she likes the Blue and California Naturals, so I'll ask my mom to look at the kitty versions of those. Mom has never been able to convince me that canned food is anything other than a treat, not like, you know, real breakfast or dinner, but we have water fountains upstairs and down, so that Addy and I always have fresh water available.

And maybe, even though I won't eat canned every day for my main meals, Mom will give it to me more often as a treat! That might be fun!
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Aquavit, Feb 26 10:19 am


Food & Nutrition > New food needed

Aquavit

Queen of the- Mansion
 
 
Purred: Sat Feb 20, '10 2:38pm PST 
Thanks, Mason!
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» There has since been 3 posts. Last posting by Aquavit, Feb 26 10:19 am


Saying Goodbye: Memorials & Support > Retsina is gone to the Bridge

Retsina,- 1993-2010

Queen of the- Mansion- (retired)
 
 
Purred: Sat Feb 20, '10 2:14pm PST 
She was sixteen. Until the last year, her vets asked me if I was really sure about her age, and made jokes about having a Picture of Dorian Kitty in the attic. In the last year, though, she slowed down, her kidneys started to fail--and finally her liver failed to. Right up to the end, she was still eating, drinking, and demanding her share of attention and love.

She was the sweetest little kitty in the world.
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» There has since been 8 posts. Last posting by Sky, Mar 8 5:38 pm

Food & Nutrition > New food needed
Aquavit

Queen of the- Mansion
 
 
Purred: Sat Feb 20, '10 6:50am PST 
That sounds like a great possibility! I include Natural Balance in my dog's rotation; thanks!
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» There has since been 5 posts. Last posting by Aquavit, Feb 26 10:19 am


Food & Nutrition > New food needed

Aquavit

Queen of the- Mansion
 
 
Purred: Fri Feb 19, '10 7:01pm PST 
First, I want to start by saying that I haven't been able to get either of my cats to reliably and consistently eat any canned food, and that's not a battle I'm equipped to fight right now.

Retsina had an incredibly sensitive stomach, and for most of her life my food choices for the cats have been dictated by what didn't make her vomit daily. About a year ago, she was diagnosed with kidney failure, and with great reluctance I switched both the cats to Science Diet K/D. However, Retsina has now gone to the Bridge, Aquavit doesn't need to be on K/D--and Aquavit will eat most any decent kibble.

So I'm looking for a new food. Preferably something high-quality, and low-phosphorus--she's not in renal failure, but she's just shy of her twelfth birthday, and if I get her on something healthier for her kidneys now, maybe I'll never have to deal with Science Diet again.

Any suggestions?
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» There has since been 7 posts. Last posting by Aquavit, Feb 26 10:19 am


Behavior & Training > Indoors or Outdoors - Cruel or Kind?

Aquavit

Queen of the- Mansion
 
 
Purred: Fri Nov 27, '09 2:10pm PST 
Well, my post is a mess, and for some reason, even though I noticed immediately and hit the edit button, I can't edit it. Sorry!red face
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Miss Tiny Burr Burr, Nov 27 9:18 pm


Behavior & Training > Indoors or Outdoors - Cruel or Kind?

Aquavit

Queen of the- Mansion
 
 
Purred: Fri Nov 27, '09 2:03pm PST 
Here in England it is expected that you will let your cats out......they are seen as semi-wild animals and it is seen as cruel if you do not let them out, at least a little........

There in England, you have essentially no predators.

In all parts of North America, we have a lot of things for which cats look like anything from a quite decent meal to a tasty snack. Dogs, cars, and crazy humans are not remotely the only threats outdoor cats face here. I live in a pretty thickly settled city, and we have coyotes and foxes and opossoms, as well as hawks that are a real threat to smaller cats.

In a neighboring suburb, there are bears.

A bit further out, and there are bobcats and fishers (a large and nasty weasel). There are confirmed reports of wolves just a little ways north of here, and unconfirmed reports of cougars.

And this is a long-settled and fairly tame region of the continent. There are areas where the existing wild predators are both bigger and more common.

This is why we have such different attitudes about the acceptability of letting cats out, or keeping them in.

Having said all that, there are still plenty of people who let their cats out, and while most cats do just fine as indoor-only cats, for some it just does not work. I know someone who, after a couple of years of unsuccessfully trying to keep her two cats inside or confined to the portion of the property that's cat-fenced, had to accept the fact that both of them, for a combination of reasonere in England it is expected that you will let your cats out......they are seen as semi-wild animals and it is seen as cruel if you do not let them out, at least a little........

There in England, you have essentially no predators.

In all parts of North America, we have a lot of things for which cats look like anything from a quite decent meal to a tasty snack. Dogs, cars, and crazy humans are not remotely the only threats outdoor cats face here. I live in a pretty thickly settled city, and we have coyotes and foxes and opossoms, as well as hawks that are a real threat to smaller cats.

In a neighboring suburb, there are bears.

A bit further out, and there are
bobcats and fishers (a large and nasty weasel). There are confirmed reports of wolves just a little ways north of here, and unconfirmed reports of cougars.

And this is a long-settled and fairly tame region of the continent. There are areas where the existing wild predators are both bigger and more common.

This is why we have such different attitudes about the acceptability of letting cats out, or keeping them in.

Having said all that, there are still plenty of people who let their cats out, and while most cats do just fine as indoor-only cats, for some it just does not work. I know someone who, after a couple of years of unsuccessfully trying to keep her two cats inside or confined to the portion of the property that's cat-fenced, had to accept the fact that both of them, for a combination of reasons, win England it is expected that you will let your cats out......they are seen as semi-wild animals and it is seen as cruel if you do not let them out, at least a little........

There in England, you have essentially no predators.

In all parts of North America, we have a lot of things for which cats look like anything from a quite decent meal to a tasty snack. Dogs, cars, and crazy humans are not remotely the only threats outdoor cats face here. I live in a pretty thickly settled city, and we have coyotes and foxes and opossoms, as well as hawks that are a real threat to smaller cats.

In a neighboring suburb, there are bears.

A bit further out, and there are
bobcats and fishers (a large and nasty weasel). There are confirmed reports of wolves just a little ways north of here, and unconfirmed reports of cougars.

And this is a long-settled and fairly tame region of the continent. There are areas where the existing wild predators are both bigger and more common.

This is why we have such different attitudes about the acceptability of letting cats out, or keeping them in.

Having said all that, there are still plenty of people who let their cats out, and while most cats do just fine as indoor-only cats, for some it just does not work. I know someone who, after a couple of years of unsuccessfully trying to keep her two cats inside or confined to the portion of the property that's cat-fenced, had to accept the fact that both of them, for a combination of reasons, were ngland it is expected that you will let your cats out......they are seen as semi-wild animals and it is seen as cruel if you do not let them out, at least a little........

There in England, you have essentially no predators.

In all parts of North America, we have a lot of things for which cats look like anything from a quite decent meal to a tasty snack. Dogs, cars, and crazy humans are not remotely the only threats outdoor cats face here. I live in a pretty thickly settled city, and we have coyotes and foxes and opossoms, as well as hawks that are a real threat to smaller cats.

In a neighboring suburb, there are bears.

A bit further out, and there are
bobcats and fishers (a large and nasty weasel). There are confirmed reports of wolves just a little ways north of here, and unconfirmed reports of cougars.

And this is a long-settled and fairly tame region of the continent. There are areas where the existing wild predators are both bigger and more common.

This is why we have such different attitudes about the acceptability of letting cats out, or keeping them in.

Having said all that, there are still plenty of people who let their cats out, and while most cats do just fine as indoor-only cats, for some it just does not work. I know someone who, after a couple of years of unsuccessfully trying to keep her two cats inside or confined to the portion of the property that's cat-fenced, had to accept the fact that both of them, for a combination of reasons, were gettnd it is expected that you will let your cats out......they are seen as semi-wild animals and it is seen as cruel if you do not let them out, at least a little........

There in England, you have essentially no predators.

In all parts of North America, we have a lot of things for which cats look like anything from a quite decent meal to a tasty snack. Dogs, cars, and crazy humans are not remotely the only threats outdoor cats face here. I live in a pretty thickly settled city, and we have coyotes and foxes and opossoms, as well as hawks that are a real threat to smaller cats.

In a neighboring suburb, there are bears.

A bit further out, and there are
bobcats and fishers (a large and nasty weasel). There are confirmed reports of wolves just a little ways north of here, and unconfirmed reports of cougars.

And this is a long-settled and fairly tame region of the continent. There are areas where the existing wild predators are both bigger and more common.

This is why we have such different attitudes about the acceptability of letting cats out, or keeping them in.

Having said all that, there are still plenty of people who let their cats out, and while most cats do just fine as indoor-only cats, for some it just does not work. I know someone who, after a couple of years of unsuccessfully trying to keep her two cats inside or confined to the portion of the property that's cat-fenced, had to accept the fact that both of them, for a combination of reasons, were getting t is expected that you will let your cats out......they are seen as semi-wild animals and it is seen as cruel if you do not let them out, at least a little........

There in England, you have essentially no predators.

In all parts of North America, we have a lot of things for which cats look like anything from a quite decent meal to a tasty snack. Dogs, cars, and crazy humans are not remotely the only threats outdoor cats face here. I live in a pretty thickly settled city, and we have coyotes and foxes and opossoms, as well as hawks that are a real threat to smaller cats.

In a neighboring suburb, there are bears.

A bit further out, and there are
bobcats and fishers (a large and nasty weasel). There are confirmed reports of wolves just a little ways north of here, and unconfirmed reports of cougars.

And this is a long-settled and fairly tame region of the continent. There are areas where the existing wild predators are both bigger and more common.

This is why we have such different attitudes about the acceptability of letting cats out, or keeping them in.

Having said all that, there are still plenty of people who let their cats out, and while most cats do just fine as indoor-only cats, for some it just does not work. I know someone who, after a couple of years of unsuccessfully trying to keep her two cats inside or confined to the portion of the property that's cat-fenced, had to accept the fact that both of them, for a combination of reasons, were getting out expected that you will let your cats out......they are seen as semi-wild animals and it is seen as cruel if you do not let them out, at least a little........

There in England, you have essentially no predators.

In all parts of North America, we have a lot of things for which cats look like anything from a quite decent meal to a tasty snack. Dogs, cars, and crazy humans are not remotely the only threats outdoor cats face here. I live in a pretty thickly settled city, and we have coyotes and foxes and opossoms, as well as hawks that are a real threat to smaller cats.

In a neighboring suburb, there are bears.

A bit further out, and there are
bobcats and fishers (a large and nasty weasel). There are confirmed reports of wolves just a little ways north of here, and unconfirmed reports of cougars.

And this is a long-settled and fairly tame region of the continent. There are areas where the existing wild predators are both bigger and more common.

This is why we have such different attitudes about the acceptability of letting cats out, or keeping them in.

Having said all that, there are still plenty of people who let their cats out, and while most cats do just fine as indoor-only cats, for some it just does not work. I know someone who, after a couple of years of unsuccessfully trying to keep her two cats inside or confined to the portion of the property that's cat-fenced, had to accept the fact that both of them, for a combination of reasons, were getting out anywected that you will let your cats out......they are seen as semi-wild animals and it is seen as cruel if you do not let them out, at least a little........

There in England, you have essentially no predators.

In all parts of North America, we have a lot of things for which cats look like anything from a quite decent meal to a tasty snack. Dogs, cars, and crazy humans are not remotely the only threats outdoor cats face here. I live in a pretty thickly settled city, and we have coyotes and foxes and opossoms, as well as hawks that are a real threat to smaller cats.

In a neighboring suburb, there are bears.

A bit further out, and there are
bobcats and fishers (a large and nasty weasel). There are confirmed reports of wolves just a little ways north of here, and unconfirmed reports of cougars.

And this is a long-settled and fairly tame region of the continent. There are areas where the existing wild predators are both bigger and more common.

This is why we have such different attitudes about the acceptability of letting cats out, or keeping them in.

Having said all that, there are still plenty of people who let their cats out, and while most cats do just fine as indoor-only cats, for some it just does not work. I know someone who, after a couple of years of unsuccessfully trying to keep her two cats inside or confined to the portion of the property that's cat-fenced, had to accept the fact that both of them, for a combination of reasons, were getting out anyway, d that you will let your cats out......they are seen as semi-wild animals and it is seen as cruel if you do not let them out, at least a little........

There in England, you have essentially no predators.

In all parts of North America, we have a lot of things for which cats look like anything from a quite decent meal to a tasty snack. Dogs, cars, and crazy humans are not remotely the only threats outdoor cats face here. I live in a pretty thickly settled city, and we have coyotes and foxes and opossoms, as well as hawks that are a real threat to smaller cats.

In a neighboring suburb, there are bears.

A bit further out, and there are
bobcats and fishers (a large and nasty weasel). There are confirmed reports of wolves just a little ways north of here, and unconfirmed reports of cougars.

And this is a long-settled and fairly tame region of the continent. There are areas where the existing wild predators are both bigger and more common.

This is why we have such different attitudes about the acceptability of letting cats out, or keeping them in.

Having said all that, there are still plenty of people who let their cats out, and while most cats do just fine as indoor-only cats, for some it just does not work. I know someone who, after a couple of years of unsuccessfully trying to keep her two cats inside or confined to the portion of the property that's cat-fenced, had to accept the fact that both of them, for a combination of reasons, were getting out anyway, neitat you will let your cats out......they are seen as semi-wild animals and it is seen as cruel if you do not let them out, at least a little........

There in England, you have essentially no predators.

In all parts of North America, we have a lot of things for which cats look like anything from a quite decent meal to a tasty snack. Dogs, cars, and crazy humans are not remotely the only threats outdoor cats face here. I live in a pretty thickly settled city, and we have coyotes and foxes and opossoms, as well as hawks that are a real threat to smaller cats.

In a neighboring suburb, there are bears.

A bit further out, and there are
bobcats and fishers (a large and nasty weasel). There are confirmed reports of wolves just a little ways north of here, and unconfirmed reports of cougars.

And this is a long-settled and fairly tame region of the continent. There are areas where the existing wild predators are both bigger and more common.

This is why we have such different attitudes about the acceptability of letting cats out, or keeping them in.

Having said all that, there are still plenty of people who let their cats out, and while most cats do just fine as indoor-only cats, for some it just does not work. I know someone who, after a couple of years of unsuccessfully trying to keep her two cats inside or confined to the portion of the property that's cat-fenced, had to accept the fact that both of them, for a combination of reasons, were getting out anyway, neither ou will let your cats out......they are seen as semi-wild animals and it is seen as cruel if you do not let them out, at least a little........

There in England, you have essentially no predators.

In all parts of North America, we have a lot of things for which cats look like anything from a quite decent meal to a tasty snack. Dogs, cars, and crazy humans are not remotely the only threats outdoor cats face here. I live in a pretty thickly settled city, and we have coyotes and foxes and opossoms, as well as hawks that are a real threat to smaller cats.

In a neighboring suburb, there are bears.

A bit further out, and there are
bobcats and fishers (a large and nasty weasel). There are confirmed reports of wolves just a little ways north of here, and unconfirmed reports of cougars.

And this is a long-settled and fairly tame region of the continent. There are areas where the existing wild predators are both bigger and more common.

This is why we have such different attitudes about the acceptability of letting cats out, or keeping them in.

Having said all that, there are still plenty of people who let their cats out, and while most cats do just fine as indoor-only cats, for some it just does not work. I know someone who, after a couple of years of unsuccessfully trying to keep her two cats inside or confined to the portion of the property that's cat-fenced, had to accept the fact that both of them, for a combination of reasons, were getting out anyway, neither of till let your cats out......they are seen as semi-wild animals and it is seen as cruel if you do not let them out, at least a little........

There in England, you have essentially no predators.

In all parts of North America, we have a lot of things for which cats look like anything from a quite decent meal to a tasty snack. Dogs, cars, and crazy humans are not remotely the only threats outdoor cats face here. I live in a pretty thickly settled city, and we have coyotes and foxes and opossoms, as well as hawks that are a real threat to smaller cats.

In a neighboring suburb, there are bears.

A bit further out, and there are
bobcats and fishers (a large and nasty weasel). There are confirmed reports of wolves just a little ways north of here, and unconfirmed reports of cougars.

And this is a long-settled and fairly tame region of the continent. There are areas where the existing wild predators are both bigger and more common.

This is why we have such different attitudes about the acceptability of letting cats out, or keeping them in.

Having said all that, there are still plenty of people who let their cats out, and while most cats do just fine as indoor-only cats, for some it just does not work. I know someone who, after a couple of years of unsuccessfully trying to keep her two cats inside or confined to the portion of the property that's cat-fenced, had to accept the fact that both of them, for a combination of reasons, were getting out anyway, neither of them let your cats out......they are seen as semi-wild animals and it is seen as cruel if you do not let them out, at least a little........

There in England, you have essentially no predators.

In all parts of North America, we have a lot of things for which cats look like anything from a quite decent meal to a tasty snack. Dogs, cars, and crazy humans are not remotely the only threats outdoor cats face here. I live in a pretty thickly settled city, and we have coyotes and foxes and opossoms, as well as hawks that are a real threat to smaller cats.

In a neighboring suburb, there are bears.

A bit further out, and there are
bobcats and fishers (a large and nasty weasel). There are confirmed reports of wolves just a little ways north of here, and unconfirmed reports of cougars.

And this is a long-settled and fairly tame region of the continent. There are areas where the existing wild predators are both bigger and more common.

This is why we have such different attitudes about the acceptability of letting cats out, or keeping them in.

Having said all that, there are still plenty of people who let their cats out, and while most cats do just fine as indoor-only cats, for some it just does not work. I know someone who, after a couple of years of unsuccessfully trying to keep her two cats inside or confined to the portion of the property that's cat-fenced, had to accept the fact that both of them, for a combination of reasons, were getting out anyway, neither of them was your cats out......they are seen as semi-wild animals and it is seen as cruel if you do not let them out, at least a little........

There in England, you have essentially no predators.

In all parts of North America, we have a lot of things for which cats look like anything from a quite decent meal to a tasty snack. Dogs, cars, and crazy humans are not remotely the only threats outdoor cats face here. I live in a pretty thickly settled city, and we have coyotes and foxes and opossoms, as well as hawks that are a real threat to smaller cats.

In a neighboring suburb, there are bears.

A bit further out, and there are
bobcats and fishers (a large and nasty weasel). There are confirmed reports of wolves just a little ways north of here, and unconfirmed reports of cougars.

And this is a long-settled and fairly tame region of the continent. There are areas where the existing wild predators are both bigger and more common.

This is why we have such different attitudes about the acceptability of letting cats out, or keeping them in.

Having said all that, there are still plenty of people who let their cats out, and while most cats do just fine as indoor-only cats, for some it just does not work. I know someone who, after a couple of years of unsuccessfully trying to keep her two cats inside or confined to the portion of the property that's cat-fenced, had to accept the fact that both of them, for a combination of reasons, were getting out anyway, neither of them was happ cats out......they are seen as semi-wild animals and it is seen as cruel if you do not let them out, at least a little........

There in England, you have essentially no predators.

In all parts of North America, we have a lot of things for which cats look like anything from a quite decent meal to a tasty snack. Dogs, cars, and crazy humans are not remotely the only threats outdoor cats face here. I live in a pretty thickly settled city, and we have coyotes and foxes and opossoms, as well as hawks that are a real threat to smaller cats.

In a neighboring suburb, there are bears.

A bit further out, and there are
bobcats and fishers (a large and nasty weasel). There are confirmed reports of wolves just a little ways north of here, and unconfirmed reports of cougars.

And this is a long-settled and fairly tame region of the continent. There are areas where the existing wild predators are both bigger and more common.

This is why we have such different attitudes about the acceptability of letting cats out, or keeping them in.

Having said all that, there are still plenty of people who let their cats out, and while most cats do just fine as indoor-only cats, for some it just does not work. I know someone who, after a couple of years of unsuccessfully trying to keep her two cats inside or confined to the portion of the property that's cat-fenced, had to accept the fact that both of them, for a combination of reasons, were getting out anyway, neither of them was happy bes out......they are seen as semi-wild animals and it is seen as cruel if you do not let them out, at least a little........

There in England, you have essentially no predators.

In all parts of North America, we have a lot of things for which cats look like anything from a quite decent meal to a tasty snack. Dogs, cars, and crazy humans are not remotely the only threats outdoor cats face here. I live in a pretty thickly settled city, and we have coyotes and foxes and opossoms, as well as hawks that are a real threat to smaller cats.

In a neighboring suburb, there are bears.

A bit further out, and there are
bobcats and fishers (a large and nasty weasel). There are confirmed reports of wolves just a little ways north of here, and unconfirmed reports of cougars.

And this is a long-settled and fairly tame region of the continent. There are areas where the existing wild predators are both bigger and more common.

This is why we have such different attitudes about the acceptability of letting cats out, or keeping them in.

Having said all that, there are still plenty of people who let their cats out, and while most cats do just fine as indoor-only cats, for some it just does not work. I know someone who, after a couple of years of unsuccessfully trying to keep her two cats inside or confined to the portion of the property that's cat-fenced, had to accept the fact that both of them, for a combination of reasons, were getting out anyway, neither of them was happy being t......they are seen as semi-wild animals and it is seen as cruel if you do not let them out, at least a little........

There in England, you have essentially no predators.

In all parts of North America, we have a lot of things for which cats look like anything from a quite decent meal to a tasty snack. Dogs, cars, and crazy humans are not remotely the only threats outdoor cats face here. I live in a pretty thickly settled city, and we have coyotes and foxes and opossoms, as well as hawks that are a real threat to smaller cats.

In a neighboring suburb, there are bears.

A bit further out, and there are
bobcats and fishers (a large and nasty weasel). There are confirmed reports of wolves just a little ways north of here, and unconfirmed reports of cougars.

And this is a long-settled and fairly tame region of the continent. There are areas where the existing wild predators are both bigger and more common.

This is why we have such different attitudes about the acceptability of letting cats out, or keeping them in.

Having said all that, there are still plenty of people who let their cats out, and while most cats do just fine as indoor-only cats, for some it just does not work. I know someone who, after a couple of years of unsuccessfully trying to keep her two cats inside or confined to the portion of the property that's cat-fenced, had to accept the fact that both of them, for a combination of reasons, were getting out anyway, neither of them was happy being conf...they are seen as semi-wild animals and it is seen as cruel if you do not let them out, at least a little........

There in England, you have essentially no predators.

In all parts of North America, we have a lot of things for which cats look like anything from a quite decent meal to a tasty snack. Dogs, cars, and crazy humans are not remotely the only threats outdoor cats face here. I live in a pretty thickly settled city, and we have coyotes and foxes and opossoms, as well as hawks that are a real threat to smaller cats.

In a neighboring suburb, there are bears.

A bit further out, and there are
bobcats and fishers (a large and nasty weasel). There are confirmed reports of wolves just a little ways north of here, and unconfirmed reports of cougars.

And this is a long-settled and fairly tame region of the continent. There are areas where the existing wild predators are both bigger and more common.

This is why we have such different attitudes about the acceptability of letting cats out, or keeping them in.

Having said all that, there are still plenty of people who let their cats out, and while most cats do just fine as indoor-only cats, for some it just does not work. I know someone who, after a couple of years of unsuccessfully trying to keep her two cats inside or confined to the portion of the property that's cat-fenced, had to accept the fact that both of them, for a combination of reasons, were getting out anyway, neither of them was happy being confinedhey are seen as semi-wild animals and it is seen as cruel if you do not let them out, at least a little........

There in England, you have essentially no predators.

In all parts of North America, we have a lot of things for which cats look like anything from a quite decent meal to a tasty snack. Dogs, cars, and crazy humans are not remotely the only threats outdoor cats face here. I live in a pretty thickly settled city, and we have coyotes and foxes and opossoms, as well as hawks that are a real threat to smaller cats.

In a neighboring suburb, there are bears.

A bit further out, and there are
bobcats and fishers (a large and nasty weasel). There are confirmed reports of wolves just a little ways north of here, and unconfirmed reports of cougars.

And this is a long-settled and fairly tame region of the continent. There are areas where the existing wild predators are both bigger and more common.

This is why we have such different attitudes about the acceptability of letting cats out, or keeping them in.

Having said all that, there are still plenty of people who let their cats out, and while most cats do just fine as indoor-only cats, for some it just does not work. I know someone who, after a couple of years of unsuccessfully trying to keep her two cats inside or confined to the portion of the property that's cat-fenced, had to accept the fact that both of them, for a combination of reasons, were getting out anyway, neither of them was happy being confined, anare seen as semi-wild animals and it is seen as cruel if you do not let them out, at least a little........

There in England, you have essentially no predators.

In all parts of North America, we have a lot of things for which cats look like anything from a quite decent meal to a tasty snack. Dogs, cars, and crazy humans are not remotely the only threats outdoor cats face here. I live in a pretty thickly settled city, and we have coyotes and foxes and opossoms, as well as hawks that are a real threat to smaller cats.

In a neighboring suburb, there are bears.

A bit further out, and there are
bobcats and fishers (a large and nasty weasel). There are confirmed reports of wolves just a little ways north of here, and unconfirmed reports of cougars.

And this is a long-settled and fairly tame region of the continent. There are areas where the existing wild predators are both bigger and more common.

This is why we have such different attitudes about the acceptability of letting cats out, or keeping them in.

Having said all that, there are still plenty of people who let their cats out, and while most cats do just fine as indoor-only cats, for some it just does not work. I know someone who, after a couple of years of unsuccessfully trying to keep her two cats inside or confined to the portion of the property that's cat-fenced, had to accept the fact that both of them, for a combination of reasons, were getting out anyway, neither of them was happy being confined, and onseen as semi-wild animals and it is seen as cruel if you do not let them out, at least a little........

There in England, you have essentially no predators.

In all parts of North America, we have a lot of things for which cats look like anything from a quite decent meal to a tasty snack. Dogs, cars, and crazy humans are not remotely the only threats outdoor cats face here. I live in a pretty thickly settled city, and we have coyotes and foxes and opossoms, as well as hawks that are a real threat to smaller cats.

In a neighboring suburb, there are bears.

A bit further out, and there are
bobcats and fishers (a large and nasty weasel). There are confirmed reports of wolves just a little ways north of here, and unconfirmed reports of cougars.

And this is a long-settled and fairly tame region of the continent. There are areas where the existing wild predators are both bigger and more common.

This is why we have such different attitudes about the acceptability of letting cats out, or keeping them in.

Having said all that, there are still plenty of people who let their cats out, and while most cats do just fine as indoor-only cats, for some it just does not work. I know someone who, after a couple of years of unsuccessfully trying to keep her two cats inside or confined to the portion of the property that's cat-fenced, had to accept the fact that both of them, for a combination of reasons, were getting out anyway, neither of them was happy being confined, and one of as semi-wild animals and it is seen as cruel if you do not let them out, at least a little........

There in England, you have essentially no predators.

In all parts of North America, we have a lot of things for which cats look like anything from a quite decent meal to a tasty snack. Dogs, cars, and crazy humans are not remotely the only threats outdoor cats face here. I live in a pretty thickly settled city, and we have coyotes and foxes and opossoms, as well as hawks that are a real threat to smaller cats.

In a neighboring suburb, there are bears.

A bit further out, and there are
bobcats and fishers (a large and nasty weasel). There are confirmed reports of wolves just a little ways north of here, and unconfirmed reports of cougars.

And this is a long-settled and fairly tame region of the continent. There are areas where the existing wild predators are both bigger and more common.

This is why we have such different attitudes about the acceptability of letting cats out, or keeping them in.

Having said all that, there are still plenty of people who let their cats out, and while most cats do just fine as indoor-only cats, for some it just does not work. I know someone who, after a couple of years of unsuccessfully trying to keep her two cats inside or confined to the portion of the property that's cat-fenced, had to accept the fact that both of them, for a combination of reasons, were getting out anyway, neither of them was happy being confined, and one of thesemi-wild animals and it is seen as cruel if you do not let them out, at least a little........

There in England, you have essentially no predators.

In all parts of North America, we have a lot of things for which cats look like anything from a quite decent meal to a tasty snack. Dogs, cars, and crazy humans are not remotely the only threats outdoor cats face here. I live in a pretty thickly settled city, and we have coyotes and foxes and opossoms, as well as hawks that are a real threat to smaller cats.

In a neighboring suburb, there are bears.

A bit further out, and there are
bobcats and fishers (a large and nasty weasel). There are confirmed reports of wolves just a little ways north of here, and unconfirmed reports of cougars.

And this is a long-settled and fairly tame region of the continent. There are areas where the existing wild predators are both bigger and more common.

This is why we have such different attitudes about the acceptability of letting cats out, or keeping them in.

Having said all that, there are still plenty of people who let their cats out, and while most cats do just fine as indoor-only cats, for some it just does not work. I know someone who, after a couple of years of unsuccessfully trying to keep her two cats inside or confined to the portion of the property that's cat-fenced, had to accept the fact that both of them, for a combination of reasons, were getting out anyway, neither of them was happy being confined, and one of them wa-wild animals and it is seen as cruel if you do not let them out, at least a little........

There in England, you have essentially no predators.

In all parts of North America, we have a lot of things for which cats look like anything from a quite decent meal to a tasty snack. Dogs, cars, and crazy humans are not remotely the only threats outdoor cats face here. I live in a pretty thickly settled city, and we have coyotes and foxes and opossoms, as well as hawks that are a real threat to smaller cats.

In a neighboring suburb, there are bears.

A bit further out, and there are
bobcats and fishers (a large and nasty weasel). There are confirmed reports of wolves just a little ways north of here, and unconfirmed reports of cougars.

And this is a long-settled and fairly tame region of the continent. There are areas where the existing wild predators are both bigger and more common.

This is why we have such different attitudes about the acceptability of letting cats out, or keeping them in.

Having said all that, there are still plenty of people who let their cats out, and while most cats do just fine as indoor-only cats, for some it just does not work. I know someone who, after a couple of years of unsuccessfully trying to keep her two cats inside or confined to the portion of the property that's cat-fenced, had to accept the fact that both of them, for a combination of reasons, were getting out anyway, neither of them was happy being confined, and one of them was bed animals and it is seen as cruel if you do not let them out, at least a little........

There in England, you have essentially no predators.

In all parts of North America, we have a lot of things for which cats look like anything from a quite decent meal to a tasty snack. Dogs, cars, and crazy humans are not remotely the only threats outdoor cats face here. I live in a pretty thickly settled city, and we have coyotes and foxes and opossoms, as well as hawks that are a real threat to smaller cats.

In a neighboring suburb, there are bears.

A bit further out, and there are
bobcats and fishers (a large and nasty weasel). There are confirmed reports of wolves just a little ways north of here, and unconfirmed reports of cougars.

And this is a long-settled and fairly tame region of the continent. There are areas where the existing wild predators are both bigger and more common.

This is why we have such different attitudes about the acceptability of letting cats out, or keeping them in.

Having said all that, there are still plenty of people who let their cats out, and while most cats do just fine as indoor-only cats, for some it just does not work. I know someone who, after a couple of years of unsuccessfully trying to keep her two cats inside or confined to the portion of the property that's cat-fenced, had to accept the fact that both of them, for a combination of reasons, were getting out anyway, neither of them was happy being confined, and one of them was becomiimals and it is seen as cruel if you do not let them out, at least a little........

There in England, you have essentially no predators.

In all parts of North America, we have a lot of things for which cats look like anything from a quite decent meal to a tasty snack. Dogs, cars, and crazy humans are not remotely the only threats outdoor cats face here. I live in a pretty thickly settled city, and we have coyotes and foxes and opossoms, as well as hawks that are a real threat to smaller cats.

In a neighboring suburb, there are bears.

A bit further out, and there are
bobcats and fishers (a large and nasty weasel). There are confirmed reports of wolves just a little ways north of here, and unconfirmed reports of cougars.

And this is a long-settled and fairly tame region of the continent. There are areas where the existing wild predators are both bigger and more common.

This is why we have such different attitudes about the acceptability of letting cats out, or keeping them in.

Having said all that, there are still plenty of people who let their cats out, and while most cats do just fine as indoor-only cats, for some it just does not work. I know someone who, after a couple of years of unsuccessfully trying to keep her two cats inside or confined to the portion of the property that's cat-fenced, had to accept the fact that both of them, for a combination of reasons, were getting out anyway, neither of them was happy being confined, and one of them was becoming as and it is seen as cruel if you do not let them out, at least a little........

There in England, you have essentially no predators.

In all parts of North America, we have a lot of things for which cats look like anything from a quite decent meal to a tasty snack. Dogs, cars, and crazy humans are not remotely the only threats outdoor cats face here. I live in a pretty thickly settled city, and we have coyotes and foxes and opossoms, as well as hawks that are a real threat to smaller cats.

In a neighboring suburb, there are bears.

A bit further out, and there are
bobcats and fishers (a large and nasty weasel). There are confirmed reports of wolves just a little ways north of here, and unconfirmed reports of cougars.

And this is a long-settled and fairly tame region of the continent. There are areas where the existing wild predators are both bigger and more common.

This is why we have such different attitudes about the acceptability of letting cats out, or keeping them in.

Having said all that, there are still plenty of people who let their cats out, and while most cats do just fine as indoor-only cats, for some it just does not work. I know someone who, after a couple of years of unsuccessfully trying to keep her two cats inside or confined to the portion of the property that's cat-fenced, had to accept the fact that both of them, for a combination of reasons, were getting out anyway, neither of them was happy being confined, and one of them was becoming an owd it is seen as cruel if you do not let them out, at least a little........

There in England, you have essentially no predators.

In all parts of North America, we have a lot of things for which cats look like anything from a quite decent meal to a tasty snack. Dogs, cars, and crazy humans are not remotely the only threats outdoor cats face here. I live in a pretty thickly settled city, and we have coyotes and foxes and opossoms, as well as hawks that are a real threat to smaller cats.

In a neighboring suburb, there are bears.

A bit further out, and there are
bobcats and fishers (a large and nasty weasel). There are confirmed reports of wolves just a little ways north of here, and unconfirmed reports of cougars.

And this is a long-settled and fairly tame region of the continent. There are areas where the existing wild predators are both bigger and more common.

This is why we have such different attitudes about the acceptability of letting cats out, or keeping them in.

Having said all that, there are still plenty of people who let their cats out, and while most cats do just fine as indoor-only cats, for some it just does not work. I know someone who, after a couple of years of unsuccessfully trying to keep her two cats inside or confined to the portion of the property that's cat-fenced, had to accept the fact that both of them, for a combination of reasons, were getting out anyway, neither of them was happy being confined, and one of them was becoming an owned is seen as cruel if you do not let them out, at least a little........

There in England, you have essentially no predators.

In all parts of North America, we have a lot of things for which cats look like anything from a quite decent meal to a tasty snack. Dogs, cars, and crazy humans are not remotely the only threats outdoor cats face here. I live in a pretty thickly settled city, and we have coyotes and foxes and opossoms, as well as hawks that are a real threat to smaller cats.

In a neighboring suburb, there are bears.

A bit further out, and there are
bobcats and fishers (a large and nasty weasel). There are confirmed reports of wolves just a little ways north of here, and unconfirmed reports of cougars.

And this is a long-settled and fairly tame region of the continent. There are areas where the existing wild predators are both bigger and more common.

This is why we have such different attitudes about the acceptability of letting cats out, or keeping them in.

Having said all that, there are still plenty of people who let their cats out, and while most cats do just fine as indoor-only cats, for some it just does not work. I know someone who, after a couple of years of unsuccessfully trying to keep her two cats inside or confined to the portion of the property that's cat-fenced, had to accept the fact that both of them, for a combination of reasons, were getting out anyway, neither of them was happy being confined, and one of them was becoming an owned feraseen as cruel if you do not let them out, at least a little........

There in England, you have essentially no predators.

In all parts of North America, we have a lot of things for which cats look like anything from a quite decent meal to a tasty snack. Dogs, cars, and crazy humans are not remotely the only threats outdoor cats face here. I live in a pretty thickly settled city, and we have coyotes and foxes and opossoms, as well as hawks that are a real threat to smaller cats.

In a neighboring suburb, there are bears.

A bit further out, and there are
bobcats and fishers (a large and nasty weasel). There are confirmed reports of wolves just a little ways north of here, and unconfirmed reports of cougars.

And this is a long-settled and fairly tame region of the continent. There are areas where the existing wild predators are both bigger and more common.

This is why we have such different attitudes about the acceptability of letting cats out, or keeping them in.

Having said all that, there are still plenty of people who let their cats out, and while most cats do just fine as indoor-only cats, for some it just does not work. I know someone who, after a couple of years of unsuccessfully trying to keep her two cats inside or confined to the portion of the property that's cat-fenced, had to accept the fact that both of them, for a combination of reasons, were getting out anyway, neither of them was happy being confined, and one of them was becoming an owned feral, c as cruel if you do not let them out, at least a little........

There in England, you have essentially no predators.

In all parts of North America, we have a lot of things for which cats look like anything from a quite decent meal to a tasty snack. Dogs, cars, and crazy humans are not remotely the only threats outdoor cats face here. I live in a pretty thickly settled city, and we have coyotes and foxes and opossoms, as well as hawks that are a real threat to smaller cats.

In a neighboring suburb, there are bears.

A bit further out, and there are
bobcats and fishers (a large and nasty weasel). There are confirmed reports of wolves just a little ways north of here, and unconfirmed reports of cougars.

And this is a long-settled and fairly tame region of the continent. There are areas where the existing wild predators are both bigger and more common.

This is why we have such different attitudes about the acceptability of letting cats out, or keeping them in.

Having said all that, there are still plenty of people who let their cats out, and while most cats do just fine as indoor-only cats, for some it just does not work. I know someone who, after a couple of years of unsuccessfully trying to keep her two cats inside or confined to the portion of the property that's cat-fenced, had to accept the fact that both of them, for a combination of reasons, were getting out anyway, neither of them was happy being confined, and one of them was becoming an owned feral, comincruel if you do not let them out, at least a little........

There in England, you have essentially no predators.

In all parts of North America, we have a lot of things for which cats look like anything from a quite decent meal to a tasty snack. Dogs, cars, and crazy humans are not remotely the only threats outdoor cats face here. I live in a pretty thickly settled city, and we have coyotes and foxes and opossoms, as well as hawks that are a real threat to smaller cats.

In a neighboring suburb, there are bears.

A bit further out, and there are
bobcats and fishers (a large and nasty weasel). There are confirmed reports of wolves just a little ways north of here, and unconfirmed reports of cougars.

And this is a long-settled and fairly tame region of the continent. There are areas where the existing wild predators are both bigger and more common.

This is why we have such different attitudes about the acceptability of letting cats out, or keeping them in.

Having said all that, there are still plenty of people who let their cats out, and while most cats do just fine as indoor-only cats, for some it just does not work. I know someone who, after a couple of years of unsuccessfully trying to keep her two cats inside or confined to the portion of the property that's cat-fenced, had to accept the fact that both of them, for a combination of reasons, were getting out anyway, neither of them was happy being confined, and one of them was becoming an owned feral, coming hol if you do not let them out, at least a little........

There in England, you have essentially no predators.

In all parts of North America, we have a lot of things for which cats look like anything from a quite decent meal to a tasty snack. Dogs, cars, and crazy humans are not remotely the only threats outdoor cats face here. I live in a pretty thickly settled city, and we have coyotes and foxes and opossoms, as well as hawks that are a real threat to smaller cats.

In a neighboring suburb, there are bears.

A bit further out, and there are
bobcats and fishers (a large and nasty weasel). There are confirmed reports of wolves just a little ways north of here, and unconfirmed reports of cougars.

And this is a long-settled and fairly tame region of the continent. There are areas where the existing wild predators are both bigger and more common.

This is why we have such different attitudes about the acceptability of letting cats out, or keeping them in.

Having said all that, there are still plenty of people who let their cats out, and while most cats do just fine as indoor-only cats, for some it just does not work. I know someone who, after a couple of years of unsuccessfully trying to keep her two cats inside or confined to the portion of the property that's cat-fenced, had to accept the fact that both of them, for a combination of reasons, were getting out anyway, neither of them was happy being confined, and one of them was becoming an owned feral, coming home o you do not let them out, at least a little........

There in England, you have essentially no predators.

In all parts of North America, we have a lot of things for which cats look like anything from a quite decent meal to a tasty snack. Dogs, cars, and crazy humans are not remotely the only threats outdoor cats face here. I live in a pretty thickly settled city, and we have coyotes and foxes and opossoms, as well as hawks that are a real threat to smaller cats.

In a neighboring suburb, there are bears.

A bit further out, and there are
bobcats and fishers (a large and nasty weasel). There are confirmed reports of wolves just a little ways north of here, and unconfirmed reports of cougars.

And this is a long-settled and fairly tame region of the continent. There are areas where the existing wild predators are both bigger and more common.

This is why we have such different attitudes about the acceptability of letting cats out, or keeping them in.

Having said all that, there are still plenty of people who let their cats out, and while most cats do just fine as indoor-only cats, for some it just does not work. I know someone who, after a couple of years of unsuccessfully trying to keep her two cats inside or confined to the portion of the property that's cat-fenced, had to accept the fact that both of them, for a combination of reasons, were getting out anyway, neither of them was happy being confined, and one of them was becoming an owned feral, coming home only do not let them out, at least a little........

There in England, you have essentially no predators.

In all parts of North America, we have a lot of things for which cats look like anything from a quite decent meal to a tasty snack. Dogs, cars, and crazy humans are not remotely the only threats outdoor cats face here. I live in a pretty thickly settled city, and we have coyotes and foxes and opossoms, as well as hawks that are a real threat to smaller cats.

In a neighboring suburb, there are bears.

A bit further out, and there are
bobcats and fishers (a large and nasty weasel). There are confirmed reports of wolves just a little ways north of here, and unconfirmed reports of cougars.

And this is a long-settled and fairly tame region of the continent. There are areas where the existing wild predators are both bigger and more common.

This is why we have such different attitudes about the acceptability of letting cats out, or keeping them in.

Having said all that, there are still plenty of people who let their cats out, and while most cats do just fine as indoor-only cats, for some it just does not work. I know someone who, after a couple of years of unsuccessfully trying to keep her two cats inside or confined to the portion of the property that's cat-fenced, had to accept the fact that both of them, for a combination of reasons, were getting out anyway, neither of them was happy being confined, and one of them was becoming an owned feral, coming home only whennot let them out, at least a little........

There in England, you have essentially no predators.

In all parts of North America, we have a lot of things for which cats look like anything from a quite decent meal to a tasty snack. Dogs, cars, and crazy humans are not remotely the only threats outdoor cats face here. I live in a pretty thickly settled city, and we have coyotes and foxes and opossoms, as well as hawks that are a real threat to smaller cats.

In a neighboring suburb, there are bears.

A bit further out, and there are
bobcats and fishers (a large and nasty weasel). There are confirmed reports of wolves just a little ways north of here, and unconfirmed reports of cougars.

And this is a long-settled and fairly tame region of the continent. There are areas where the existing wild predators are both bigger and more common.

This is why we have such different attitudes about the acceptability of letting cats out, or keeping them in.

Having said all that, there are still plenty of people who let their cats out, and while most cats do just fine as indoor-only cats, for some it just does not work. I know someone who, after a couple of years of unsuccessfully trying to keep her two cats inside or confined to the portion of the property that's cat-fenced, had to accept the fact that both of them, for a combination of reasons, were getting out anyway, neither of them was happy being confined, and one of them was becoming an owned feral, coming home only when it let them out, at least a little........

There in England, you have essentially no predators.

In all parts of North America, we have a lot of things for which cats look like anything from a quite decent meal to a tasty snack. Dogs, cars, and crazy humans are not remotely the only threats outdoor cats face here. I live in a pretty thickly settled city, and we have coyotes and foxes and opossoms, as well as hawks that are a real threat to smaller cats.

In a neighboring suburb, there are bears.

A bit
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» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by Miss Tiny Burr Burr, Nov 27 9:18 pm

Home Prepared Food & Recipes > sweet candy for cats
Aquavit

Queen of the- Mansion
 
 
Purred: Thu Nov 26, '09 9:42am PST 
Michis has a real sweet tooth ,

No. Cats do not have the ability to detect sweetness. They have no functioning copy of the gene that codes for it. This is why anti-freeze is usually a bigger threat to dogs than cats--it's just as deadly to cats if they drink it, but dogs detect the sweetness and are attracted to it whether or not they're thirsty, while cats do not, and will drink it only if they are very thirsty and can't find a better source of "water."

she eats ice cream , marshmellows and caramel cream.

It's the dairy and the gelatin, not the sweetness, which she can't taste.
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» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by Spike, Nov 29 7:58 pm

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