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Eww, mold

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Shade

My name is not- Kittyfloss!
 
 
Purred: Mon Aug 8, '11 4:21am PST 
Well, we came back from 8 days of vacation to find mold all around our two lower level litter boxes. The cats were boarded, so they weren't exposed, but boy it was gross to clean up.

We use World's Best in our 3 boxes. Our lower level is half underground and half above, and it does sometimes get pretty damp down there. In both lower level boxes I found balls of fuzzy mold. In the 1 box it was just on the surface, but in the other box there were litte balls throughout the entire box. So everything had to go out and of course the boxes got washed. Then I realized that there was mold growing all around on the floor and walls by the box in the back corner where there isn't a lot of light. I spent a good, long time with the shop vac and a sponge cleaning up.

So, the moral of the story, watch those boxes using corn litter if they are in a part of your house where it might get damp. The box we have in our main floor bathroom was perfectly fine.

Purrs,
Shade
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Pandora

go getter kitter
 
 
Purred: Mon Aug 8, '11 8:14am PST 
This is one objection I have to plant based litter, I never knew for sure but assumed it would allow fungus to grow.
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Shadow

Education is the- Key
 
 
Purred: Fri Aug 12, '11 12:10pm PST 
we just read this about mold in corn based litters shockrnrnhttp://truthaboutpetfood.com/articles/caution-to-use-of-c orn -based-cat-litters.htmlrnrnCorn and moisture are not a good combination; deadly aflatoxin mold can be the result. While many pet owners avoid corn ingredients in their pet foods because of the concern of aflatoxin, do we now have a new concern with corn cat litters? One pet owner says a definite yes; the death of her pet raises suspicion to aflatoxin poisoning from Worlds Best Cat Litter; a corn based cat litter.rnrnIn late 2005, many pet owners learned a new word to be worried about; aflatoxin. Diamond Pet Foods contaminated with the deadly mold aflatoxin was recalled; at least 100 dogs were killed. http://www.fda.gov/Safety/Recalls/ArchiveRecalls/2005/ucm111929.htm In October 2009, Wysong Pet Foods recalled numerous brands of pet food due to aflatoxin contamination. http://www.truthaboutpetfood.com/articles/wysong-dog-food-recall.htm l Because of these recalls and the true concern of aflatoxins, many pet owners avoid at all costs corn ingredient in pet foods and pet treats.rnrnBut what about corn cat litters? rnrnI hate to admit this, but it’s something I never thought about prior to receiving an alarming email from a pet owner. “Is it possible that a corn-based cat litter could contain aflatoxins once it has come into contact with a moisture-rich environment (i.e. litter box). My 3 cats began vomiting and one developed hepatic lipidosis resulting in the insertion of a food tube but then developed hind leg paralysis; another developed kidney disease; and the third is now ok once the litter was replaced with clay. Unfortunately, the one with hepatic lipidosis was euthanized because her prognosis was so poor (miss her terribly).”rnrnMy first thoughts…of course it could be possible. With further information, it seems clear it is VERY possible. rnrnFrom Cornell University Department of Animal Science “the commodities with the highest risk of aflatoxin contamination are corn, peanuts and cottonseed. Pre-harvest aflatoxin contamination of peanuts and corn is favored by high temperatures, prolonged drought conditions, and high insect activity; while post-harvest production of aflatoxins on corn and peanuts is favored by warm temperatures and high humidity.” rnhttp://www.ansci.cornell.edu/plants/toxicagents/aflatoxin/aflato xin.htmlrnrnWith corn ingredient pet food and cat litter, pet owners first need to trust that the corn was accurately tested prior to pet food or cat litter manufacturing. Testing accuracy is difficult. Consider a ton of grain. Only one small sample of each ton is tested for toxins. While that one small sample might test clean, it is possible another section within the ton of corn IS infected. Again, testing accuracy is difficult.rnrnNext, a pet owner has the concern if the corn ingredient pet food and/or corn cat litter was subject to warm temperature and high humidity after production of the product. This would include warehousing conditions of the product long after it left the manufacturer. With corn cat litter, this could happen right in your litter box. Covered litter boxes with added warm urine.rnrnThe livestock industry tells farmers that “uninfected corn at 18% moisture can only be safely stored for just over a month at 70 degrees F”. Broken kernels of corn are three to four times more susceptible to mold growth than intact kernels. http://nationalhogfarmer.com/nutrition/0101-mold-infected-corn/rn rnEven clumping corn cat litter and the absolute cleanest litter box – remnants of moisture remain in the box. Are they growing deadly mycotoxins that could be inhaled and consumed by cats visiting the litter box? If so, what is the risk to cats?rnrn“Mycotoxins can show carcinogenic, mutagenic, toxic, teratogenic or immunotoxic effects. Mycotoxin exposure in the workplace may occur through inhalation and skin contact, e.g. during occupational handling of organic matter such as livestock feed, food products, or waste. Various studies suggest that both acute and chronic effects can occur, depending at least on the exposure level. The magnitude of the potential health risks associated with a respiratory or dermal intake of mycotoxins has largely remained unclear to date.” Published 2/26/2009rnhttp://www.springerlink.com/content/g84651382h40326p/ rnrnThis is Zelda.rn rnrnrnZelda had to be euthanized because of liver failure and numerous other complications. Zelda’s Mom – JH – is needless to say heartbroken. JH wanted other pet owners to be alerted to the possibility of risk with corn cat litters. Below are some of her comments.rnrn“The illnesses of my cats have occurred within such a short period of time (within 4 weeks of switching to Worlds Best Cat Litter in late December 2009). Soon after euthanizing my Zelda and seeing the decline of my two remaining cats, my husband and I were really puzzled and convinced that they had come into contact with something toxic The only change that had been made was the litter; so we quickly switched back to the clay, and neither has vomited since.”rnrn“After relaying my concerns about the litter to her primary vet, she said that the presence of aflatoxin would be her main concern, but could not definitively say that was the cause. I'm still waiting for comments from the specialists who included an internist, oncologist, and cardiologist. I think that the simple fact there is suspicion and probable cause is enough to warn others.”rnrnDr. Berryessa from Georgia Veterinary Specialsts (who treated Zelda) stated that “aflatoxin is definitely associated with corn but could not conclusively say that this caused Zelda’s liver failure; she was cremated and an autopsy was not performed. He further stated that if this litter is ingested, it could aggravate a cat who has kidney disease because it could contribute to dehydration.” rnrnThe cat litter company, Worlds Best Cat Litter, told JH the lot number was tested clean of aflatoxins. JH told the company her “concern was not with the product in the bag, but rather what happened to it once it is used as litter and comes into contact with moisture.”rnrnWhile Worlds Best Cat Litter did respond to JH’s concerns with the litter, an email from their ‘Research Department’ is very suspicious (and down right stupid in my book). Please take a close look at the sections I bolded…rnrn“We use corn and other ingredients, which meet the standards for pet foods. There are no possibilities of contamination and toxicity issue when the product is in the bag and fresh out the bag. We use a high temperature and pressure process to produce the product and make the product meeting feed/pet foods standards in terms of microorganisms. The product was made in winter (Nov. 29th, 2009) and won't have any mold or fungi issues in normal conditions unless it has been subjected to high temperature and high humidity or moisture in the litter box.”rnrn‘There are no possibilities of contamination and toxicity issue when the product is in the bag and fresh out the bag. The product won’t have any mold or fungi issues unless it has been subjected to moisture in the litter box.’rnrnDoes Worlds Best Cat Litter understand what cat litter is used for? rnrnI have to wonder if Worlds Best Cat Litter ever bothered to test their products for toxins when it was used as a litter. I wonder if anyone ever gave the slightest thought to moisture in the litter box. If anyone ever gave the slightest thought of the pets that would be using this litter.rnrnDr. Cathy will be adding her concerns in a follow up article soon.rnrnMy sincere thanks to JH for allowing me to share her heartbreaking story with readers; her wish as is mine is that by sharing this heartbreak, other lives can be saved. I hope your other babies fully recover; I hope your broken heart will heal soon. Zelda will not be forgotten. rnrnAdd corn cat litter to your list of cautions for your pets, any corn litter. rnrn rn rnrnWishing you and your pet(s) the best,rnrnSusan ThixtonrnTruth about Pet FoodrnPetsumer Reportrnwww.TruthaboutPetFood.com
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Orange Ruffy

The Baboo Kitty- has Spoken!
 
 
Purred: Fri Aug 12, '11 1:19pm PST 
We stopped using WBCL a few months ago because we hated the smell when the litter got wet-it smelled like brewry dregs gone rancid. We also noticed our cat Ruffy who has resp.issues having wheezy breaths when he came out of the box.
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Member Since
03/27/2012
 
 
Purred: Tue Mar 27, '12 12:44pm PST 
Two of my cats came down with a very high fever (around 106) on the same evening with lethargy and no appetite. I took them to the vet and they were given IV fluids in the hospital overnight. The next day the fevers were down and we took them home. They began eating again and seemed normal. That was almost 3 weeks ago. About 4 days ago, in the morning both cats were weak in the hind legs. They could walk but seemed to be limping/weak in the legs but eating ok. One of the cats had a slight trembling to him that evening but when I covered him with a blanket it seemed to stop. They have been improving the last few days but just seem to be very tired, not lethargic like they were with no fever. They are eating and eliminating normally, even playing when prompted. They just seem to be sleeping alot. My other cats have shown no symptoms at all. We are suspecting some sort of aflatoxin involvement from switching to corn cat litter since that was the only thing that changed in our household. All the bloodwork came back normal. Our vet is telling us that it is FUO but will not comment on the aflatoxin suggestion. We have already spent a large amount of money for overnight hospitalization for our two cats and we do not want to stress them out again by taking them to another vet at this time as they seem to be getting better. Any thoughts from anyone out there would be appreciated. Thank you
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Lacey

Backflips are my- specialty!
 
 
Purred: Tue Mar 27, '12 1:43pm PST 
I assume you stopped using that litter right? I hope? Cleaned the boxes with something like vinegar and water, maybe even throw them away and start over. Whether or not the vet thinks it's alfatoxins, they are having symptoms as such and since they can't find anything else, I suggest getting rid of it immediately. I'm so sorry about your kitties, I hope they'll be alright. frown
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Member Since
03/27/2012
 
 
Purred: Wed Mar 28, '12 11:41am PST 
Yes we got rid of it immediately after realizing it could be the litter that made them sick. We switched back to Feline Pine which we had been using for many years before World's Best Cat Litter. We don't know what to do because our two cats are having "flu like" symptoms as far as being tired, muscle weakness and trembling. Otherwise they are ok and our other cats never showed any symptoms. We don't want to harm them by not taking them to the vet again but the vet does not seem to have any answers for this other than to run the same tests again. It is very frustrating because they are so alert and look great except for the tiredness and weakness in walking(which seems to come and go). They do not have any signs to indicate any other kind of illness that I can find on the internet. They have no fever or abnormal behavior other than acting like a person would act when they have the flu. I am looking for suggestions from anyone if they have had experience with this type of illness. As a side note, we have a younger cat(6 months) who the vet told us had "herpes virus" because when we first got her she had "leaky" eyes. (Although she was never actually tested for any herpes virus). The leaky eyes went away after about a month. She was prescribed lysine paste and given eye drops. The vet never made mention to us that any of this could be related. I am not a doctor so I don't know, maybe it is? I have read that there is a herpes virus/calcivirus that causes a "limping syndrome" in cats. Any ideas from anyone please.
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George,- Mary & Willy- Darcy

In Residence at- Pemberly
 
 
Purred: Thu Mar 29, '12 7:12am PST 
Thanks to the CATSTER members who shared their problems with corn litter. I had thought about trying it, but will CERTAINLY not do so after reading these posts.

The New Orleans Kitties
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Daisy Angel

Pretty girl!
 
 
Purred: Thu Mar 29, '12 11:25am PST 
We bought a container of corn-based litter about a year ago, and when we opened it, it was smelly and full of mold. We brought it right back to the store.

We now stick with clumping clay as one of the kitties will urinate in front of the box if it's not clay litter.
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Member Since
07/11/2013
 
 
Purred: Thu Jul 11, '13 4:37pm PST 
My cat never had health problems until I recently began using WBCL and now he may be going into renal failure. He's only 4 yrs old so not age related. I'm switching back to clay or Green Tea Leaves litter. Beware of WBCL!
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