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Cleaning Products that are TOXIC To Kitties

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Cowboy

The Battle Of- Texas 2010- Winner!
 
 
Purred: Sun Feb 27, '11 6:37am PST 
Just in case, some are not aware, that some cleaning products, are toxic to kitties. wave

http://www.peteducation.com/article.cfm?c=1+1411&aid=2235

http://www.peteducation.com/article.cfm?c=1+1411&aid=2280

http:// www.peteducation.com/article.cfm?c=1+1411&aid=2281

http://www.pet education.com/article.cfm?c=1+1411&aid=2278

http://www.peteducati on.com/article.cfm?c=1+1411&aid=2251

Here is the whole list of things that are toxic to kitties. wave

http://www.peteducation.com/emergency.cfm?tab=2
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Penn & Teller

Masters of The- Multiverse
 
 
Purred: Sun Feb 27, '11 1:02pm PST 
Why don't links work
I'm being lazy and in bed cuz I'm real sick Cowboy and my iPad thingy doesn't copy/paste links from the Catster posts can you list em in your post? Pretttttty pleeeeease? With catnip on top?
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Cowboy

The Battle Of- Texas 2010- Winner!
 
 
Purred: Sun Feb 27, '11 3:17pm PST 
I am so sorry your not feeling well, I work 6 days a week, and other than laundromat today, I did nothing, and even took a nappy, hope your feeling better soon, be very glad to do that for you. I think sometimes too, the Catster fleas like to put spaces in the links, mol. laugh out loud

First one is Bleach Poisoning:


Toxin
Sodium hypochlorite, hypochlorite salts, sodium peroxide, sodium perborate, or enzymatic detergents.

Source
Bleach, Clorox, and swimming pool supplies.

General Information
Household bleaches are generally mild to moderate irritants affecting the mucous membranes and esophagus. Animals rarely ingest enough bleach to cause toxicity and what they do ingest typically causes vomiting which limits the amount absorbed. The hypochlorite bleaches are alkaline resulting in alkali burns to tissues that contact it. Sodium perborate degrades to borate (see borate poisoning) and hydrogen peroxide which may irritate the stomach and cause vomiting.

Toxic Dose
Varies depending on source.

Signs
With ingestion, signs include drooling, vomiting, abdominal pain, and sore throat. The hair coat especially around the mouth and paws, may be bleached or smell like chlorine. If fumes were inhaled, signs such as coughing, difficulty breathing, or retching due to pulmonary irritation may be seen.

Immediate Action
DO NOT induce vomiting. Give milk or water if ingested. If dermal (skin) exposure occurred, wash and rinse the hair coat thoroughly. Seek veterinary attention.

Veterinary Care
General treatment: Large quantities of water or milk are administered.

Supportive treatment: The animal is monitored and treated for difficulty breathing, vomiting, and abdominal pain.

Specific treatment: Unavailable.

Prognosis
Fair to good.


Next one is Borate Poisoning:

Toxin
Borate, Boric Acid, and Boron.

Source
Ant and roach baits, flea products, herbicides, fertilizers, denture cleaners, contact lens solutions, antiseptics, disinfectants, cleaning compounds, and mouthwash.

General Information
The mode of action of borate poisoning is unknown. It acts as an irritant which damages cells. The borates are concentrated in and cause the most damage in the kidneys.

Toxic Dose
Not determined for dog and cat.

Signs
Drooling, vomiting, abdominal pain, diarrhea, depression, ataxia, hyperesthesia, muscle weakness, tremors, seizures, blood in the urine, decreased urine production, coma, and death.

Immediate Action
Induce vomiting if ingested. Seek veterinary attention. If dermal exposure occurred, thoroughly wash the pet with warm soapy water. Dry thoroughly. Do not allow the pet to become chilled. Wear protective clothing/gloves to prevent human exposure.

Veterinary Care
General treatment: The induction of vomiting may be continued and gastric lavage is performed. Activated charcoal is not usually recommended due to the abnormally large volume needed to be effective. Bathing is repeated when there has been dermal exposure.

Supportive treatment: IV fluids are administered to maintain hydration and decrease the risk of kidney damage. The kidneys are monitored for several days to determine damage.

Specific treatment: Unavailable.

Prognosis
Variable


Next one is Citrus Oil Toxicity:

Toxin
Citrus Oil Extract (Limonene and Linalool).

Source
Citrus oil extracts such as those found in insecticidal sprays, dips, shampoos, insect repellents, food additives, and fragrances.

General Information
d-Limonene and linalool are citrus oils with insecticidal properties. These are metabolized in the liver resulting in liver damage or failure.

Toxic Dose
Cats are more sensitive than dogs. The toxic dose for ingestion of d-limonene in dogs is 308 grams per pound of body weight. If cats are treated with dog products, the result may be fatal. Linalool exposure causes more severe clinical signs for a longer duration than d-limonene. If the product also contains piperonyl butoxide, the toxic effects of citrus oil extracts may be increased.

Signs
Strong citrus smell to the skin, drooling, depression, weakness, hypothermia, trembling, ataxia, falling, low blood pressure, and dermatitis especially severe in the scrotal and perineal areas. Death may occur.

Immediate Action
In cases of dermal exposure, bathe pet with liquid dish soap and warm water repeatedly until the citrus smell is gone. Dry thoroughly and do not allow the pet to become chilled. Seek veterinary attention for dermal exposure or ingestion.

Veterinary Care
General treatment: Gastric lavage is performed and activated charcoal is administered, if the citrus oil was ingested. Vomiting is not induced because aspiration is a risk. Bathing is repeated in cases of dermal exposure.

Supportive treatment: Administer IV fluids, keeping the patient warm, and treat any other symptoms.

Specific treatment: Unavailable.

Prognosis
Usually good to excellent, however, deaths have occurred and are more common in cats.


Next one is Detergent Poisoning:

Toxin
Detergents

Source
Detergents are divided into several categories.

Soaps: Bar soaps, laundry soaps, and homemade soaps.

Anionic detergents: Laundry detergents, shampoos, dish soaps, and electric dishwashing detergents.

Cationic detergents: Fabric softeners, sanitizers, disinfectants, and rust inhibitors in petroleum products. This category includes quaternary ammoniums.

Non-ionic detergents: Dishwashing detergents, shampoos, and some laundry detergents.

General Information
Detergents come in a variety of forms with each having a different level of toxicity. Every home has these common products in some form, and all family members need to be aware of the dangers.

Toxic Dose
Soaps: True soaps are usually not toxic.

Anionic: Slightly to moderately toxic; may result in illness but generally not fatalities.

Cationic: Highly to extremely toxic; 1% solutions are damaging to mucous membranes.

Non-ionic: Less toxic than the anionic and cationic detergents.

Signs
Soaps: Vomiting and diarrhea. Homemade soap may cause corrosive GI lesions (burns).

Anionic: Irritated mucous membranes, vomiting, lack of appetite, diarrhea, and GI distention. May have corrosive injuries in the mouth and GI tract. Eye exposure may result in edema around the cornea, reddening and swelling of the conjunctiva, and corneal erosions or ulcers.

Cationic: Vomiting, lack of appetite, drooling, muscle weakness, depression, seizures, collapse, coma, and burns to the mouth and GI tract. Eye exposure may cause redness and severe corneal erosions and ulcers. Skin exposure may result in hair loss and skin irritation.

Non-ionic: Vomiting and diarrhea.

Immediate Action
DO NOT induce vomiting if ingested. It may cause more harm. Seek veterinary attention. In the case of dermal contact, flush the skin for at least 30 minutes with running water. In the case of eye contact, flush the eye with sterile saline or water for 20 minutes. Seek veterinary attention while you are performing the decontamination.

Veterinary Care
General treatment: Administration of milk or water in the case of soap, anionic, or non-ionic detergent ingestion, or administration of milk, water, or egg whites in the case of cationic detergent ingestion. If dermal (skin) or ocular exposure occurred, the affected areas will continue to be flushed with sterile saline.

Supportive treatment: Pain medication may be administered, hydration is maintained through IV fluids, and other treatments for symptoms may be given.

Specific treatment: Unavailable.

Prognosis
Fair to good, depending on detergent ingested.


Next one is Pine Oil Poisoning:

Toxin
Pine Oils

Source
Sanitizers and disinfectants.

General Information
Pine oils are irritating to mucous membranes. They are also readily absorbed from the GI tract resulting in severe GI signs such as vomiting and diarrhea. The kidneys and central nervous system (CNS) are also affected. Cats, birds, and some reptiles appear to be more susceptible to toxicity than other species.

Toxic Dose
0.5-1.1 ml per pound of body weight; lower amounts may cause severe damage.

Signs
The odor of pine oils is often present. Also see irritation to the inside of the mouth, retching, vomiting, drooling, abdominal pain, increased body temperature, progressive CNS signs including weakness, ataxia, and coma. Pulmonary damage may result from aspiration or chemical pneumonia from absorption of pine oil from the GI tract and subsequent deposition in the lungs. Ocular exposure will cause eye pain, holding the eye closed, and tearing.

Immediate Action
Give water, milk, or egg whites. DO NOT induce vomiting as aspiration may result due to rapid onset of CNS signs. If ocular exposure has occurred, rinse eyes with sterile saline or water for 30 minutes. In cases of dermal (skin) exposure, bathe and rinse thoroughly. Seek veterinary attention.

Veterinary Care
General treatment: Milk, water, or egg whites are administered followed by activated charcoal. If ocular exposure has occurred, eyes will be flushed with sterile saline for 30 minutes. If dermal exposure occurred, the animal will be thoroughly bathed and rinsed well.

Supportive treatment: IV fluids are administered to maintain hydration and electrolyte balances. The animal is monitored and treated for hyperthermia and pneumonia if necessary.

Specific treatment: Unavailable.

Prognosis
Guarded


Keep this and all other medications out of the reach of children and pets.


If you think your pet has been poisoned...

Contact your veterinarian or one of the Animal Poison Hotlines (listed below) if you think your pet may have accidentally received or been given an overdose of the medication.

**ASPCA National Animal Poison Control Center

1-888-4ANI-HELP (1-888-426-4435). $65.00 per case, billed to caller's credit card.

Follow-up calls can be made for no additional charge by dialing 888-299-2973.

There is no charge when the call involves a product covered by the Animal Product Safety Service.

**Pet Poison Helpline - 24-hour service available throughout North America for pet owners and veterinary professionals who require assistance with treating a potentially poisoned pet.

1-800-213-6680 ($35.00 per incident). Staffed 24-hours a day.












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Merlin - An Angel- Forever

*Poof*
 
 
Purred: Sun Feb 27, '11 4:58pm PST 
Simple Green cleaner is toxic even though it says it's safe to use around pets. Leroy licked some residue off the bathroom floor after it was cleaned and had to go to the ER because he throwing up and had mushy diarrhea and wouldn't eat.
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Penn & Teller

Masters of The- Multiverse
 
 
Purred: Sun Feb 27, '11 5:03pm PST 
Thanks! That's really helpful. What on earth is a guarded prognosis?
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Nellie

yummyyummy i got- fancy feast in- my tummy
 
 
Purred: Sun Feb 27, '11 7:29pm PST 
my mom uses clorox wipes and the wipes have never poionsed us. she has also used cleaners that have citrus sents and we never got sick from it.
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Bumpurr

RESPECT The- Star!
 
 
Purred: Mon Feb 28, '11 3:26pm PST 
Yet. wave
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Samantha

Sammerstiltskin
 
 
Purred: Mon Feb 28, '11 6:58pm PST 
Simple Green isnt safe? I use that.. What is safe? And what can i use for the floors? I use a tiny bit of Mr Clean now...
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Shade

My name is not- Kittyfloss!
 
 
Purred: Tue Mar 1, '11 3:57am PST 
You can use a mixture of vinegar and water in a spray bottle to clean with, but...does anybody remember the ratio of water to vinegar that you are supposed to use? I've been ussing the Simple Green too. I guess I was lazy about making the vinegar mixture. red face

Purrs,
Shade's mom
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Shade

My name is not- Kittyfloss!
 
 
Purred: Tue Mar 1, '11 3:59am PST 
Found a useful website:

http://www.vinegartips.com/scripts/pageViewSec.asp?id=7

It looks like a 1:1 ratio is the way to go for most things.
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