GO!

Feral Cats - After you trap them

This is a special section for cats needing new homes and for inspiring stories of cats that have found their furever home through Catster or through the love and energy of rescuers. This is also the place to discuss shelters, rescue organizations, rescue strategies, issues, solutions, etc. and how we can all help in this critical endeavor. Remember that we are all here for the love of cat! If you are posting about a cat that needs a new home, please put your location in the topic of your thread so those close by can find you! Make sure to check out Catster's cat adoption center!

  


Member Since
03/11/2012
 
 
Purred: Sun Mar 11, '12 8:41pm PST 
So you baited a trap and caught a cat. Now what? Lets assume you are going to take it in and have it spayed/neutered. What do you do with the frightened animal while waiting for the Humane Society Clinic to open? The cat is stuck in a cage with a wire floor. It has dumped the bait food on the ground trying to get out. My humane society clinic gives you a break on the price but wants you there exactly at 7am. This means getting up at 4am and catching them in the dark, if you can, then driving 30 minutes to the clinic. Or, catching them the day before and holding them until the next morning. They can't eat after midnight, but they must eat something so they will have normal blood sugar or the clinic won't do the surgery. Sometimes it takes 2 hours to catch a cat and I have missed the appointment because I wasn't there on time. Now I trap them the day before and hold them until the appointment time. If you are lucky enough to trap them the morning of the surgery, they will not eat enough food to be an issue because when the trap closes they don't want food. If you trap them the day before, they still don't want food when the trap closes but they must eat. So you take them home and put the trap with the cat inside, in a quiet place in a small dark room. You can't let them out of the cage because you might not get them back in. to sum it up: terrified cat, in a cage, unfamiliar surroundings, cat must eat but is too scared. What are you going to do? I would like a device that has 3 sections. One for feeding, one for litter, and one for sleeping. I don't believe this device has been invented yet. Does anyone have any thoughts on the above situation?
[notify]



Member Since
03/11/2012
 
 
Purred: Mon Mar 12, '12 4:55am PST 
I almost forgot, after the major surgery, the cat must be kept quiet and watched for a few days in case of complication. So now its back to the cage in a dark room in the house. Let them out of the cage and you might not get them back in when it's time to release them back where you found them.
[notify]



Member Since
03/11/2012
 
 
Purred: Mon Mar 12, '12 8:18am PST 
I almost forgot, after the major surgery, the cat must be kept quiet and watched for a few days in case of complication. So now its back to the cage in a dark room in the house. Let them out of the cage and you might not get them back in when it's time to release them back where you found them.
[notify]


Maizy

I may meow to- you if you're- worthy
 
 
Purred: Tue Mar 13, '12 12:24pm PST 
I had been considering doing the same with the ferals I feed - and have the exact same questions as you do. And how do you make sure you catch the ones you need to...I would love to see how others have done this.
[notify]



Member Since
03/01/2012
 
 
Purred: Tue Mar 13, '12 5:34pm PST 
You might find this site helpful
www.forgottenfelines.co.nz - they do a lot of work with feral cat colonies.
There is a contact email - Lizparsons@xtra.co.nz ( I know this person is very experienced with trapping and caring for feral cats and then releasing them)
[notify]



Member Since
03/11/2012
 
 
Purred: Wed Mar 14, '12 9:37am PST 
Thanx for the web site
And thanx Maizy for the response
I bought two large plastic storage containers from Wal-Mat. They have locking lids and cost about $9.00 each. I then cut a 4.5 by 6.0 inch door way in the center of one end about 1.5 inches from the floor. Next, I cut a piece of ply wood slightly larger than the door way and attched it with hinges and a slide bolt. I used a 3/4 inch hole saw and cut holes in both sides. I placed clean rags inside the container and secured the lid, but left the door of the newly constructed condo open. Next, I placed the containers next to the release door on the trap and safety wired the cage open. The whole time I'm doing this the scarred cat didn't move. I turned off the light and left the room. When I returned later, both cats had moved into the plastic condos. Food and water were placed in the trap. So the cats could stick their heads out of the condo and eat.
To carry them to the clinic, just close the condo door and load them into the car. However, the volunteer workers at the clinic said next time, move the cats back into the cage before bringing them in as it is easier for the staff to get them out of the trap then out of the condo as the cats try to escape when the volunteers open the locking lid.
Let's see if I got this right. You want me to somehow grab a terrified cat that has teeth and sharp claws, and remove it from the safety of it's new home and put in back in a steel cage? Hmmmmm. Aren't you the cat experts?
Anyway, once you pick up the cat from the clinic and get it back into the room in your house, you can provide food and water and a cat litter open box. Place the condo about 6 inches from the trap and open the door. This way they can use the litter box. After a few days of recovery, close the condo door and transport them to the release spot.
As for the volunteers, this isn't about you. Figure it out.
[notify]



Member Since
03/11/2012
 
 
Purred: Wed Mar 14, '12 1:53pm PST 
Maizy: when you trap one & take it to get neutered, ask the clinic if they will clip an ear. That way you can tell at a glance if the cat you trapped has already been fixed. They can also color the area around the stiches with permanent ink so the vet can call tell if a cat has been fixed.
[notify]