GO!

GRRRRRRRR (rant)

  
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Lola

Proud mother of- the Fab Four!
 
 
Purred: Fri Mar 13, '09 3:00am PST 
Right now, I have nine cats, and believe me, this is a burden. They go through food like there's no tomorrow, and the toilets! I've chosen this, so I'm not complaining. (Most of the kittens will find homes. I am a breeder.) But people don't realize that the emotional benefits you get from your cat(s) entail (pun?) physical effort (oh, those litter boxes...) and other inconveniences (what to do on vacation, what to do when Baby arrives, etc.). Right now, my life is centered around my cats, and I would say that that's the same for all my cat show friends, who are mostly small-scale breeders, or just have lots of cats. That's why I'm being a bit too fussy about who to give my kittens to.
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♥- Suey- ♥

Loved
 
 
Purred: Fri Mar 13, '09 3:08am PST 
I really disagree when you see former breeding cats being offered free as long as they're desexed. To my mind, it should be done beforehand, and then adopted for the cost of the surgery. In my frequent trawling of Rex breeders, I've seen that situation fairly regularly, where the Queen or Stud is being retired, but will have a home with the breeder until they find their new home. It appeals to me because I want a Rex, but would feel guilty having a kitten when I have reservations about the way the breed started (it's my whacko way of rationalising why I CAN get a Rex- the adults are here already and need lovin'!laugh out loud ). I guess it would also appeal to people who like a certain breed, but would prefer not to get a kitten for whatever reason.

I'm sorry things are so crazy for you. We are lucky in that the shelter is our middleman, so we don't have to deal with the horribleness of the ones there are no room for.
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Harvey

Has been COTD!
 
 
Purred: Fri Mar 13, '09 3:31am PST 
As far as I know, in the CFA world in Japan, former breeding cats cost money. Which is as it should be. Breeding cats are, by definition, adult, but they are also by definition quality cats (unless you're talking about some sleazy backyard breeder). I may someday be forced to exchange my breeding cats for new ones (which sounds awful, but being a breeder is different from being a pet owner, and I will never, ever, part from Spike and Harvey), but you can bet that I'm going to charge money, that they will already be spayed and neutered, and that I will be very fussy about who I give them to. I've just entered the world of breeding, so this is something in the far-off future. I was very flattered when the owner of one of the most famous catteries in Japan offered to sell me one of her retired cats. I declined, but the offer itself was a sign of trust. Breeders are almost ridiculously fussy about who they give their cats to.
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Izadore- (Izzie)

Always make it- look like the- dogs did it
 
 
Purred: Fri Mar 13, '09 7:41am PST 
I totally support the idea of charging money for a retired breeding animal. Just from listening to Harvey's mom, we know that she has put in loads of money and time with this litter, not to mention the emotional roller-coaster in finding the babies good homes.

We were offered our Springer Spaniel's brother (also named Harvey!) a while ago for free. Th dog did not meet breed standards and needed to be pet quality. My husband fell in love with him when we went to pick up our dog and the breeder saw this and that he'd have a good home with us. I will always be grateful to her for making us this offer and regret that we coudn't accept. We had just rescued, fostered and adopted our Shepherd/Husky and 4 dog would have been insane.
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♥- Suey- ♥

Loved
 
 
Purred: Fri Mar 13, '09 6:09pm PST 
I just wanted to clarify because I realise my post was a bit ambiguous. The Rexes I have looked at were being offered for around $100-$200. They had been desexed, vet checked and were up to date on their vaccinations, which the sites said made up the bulk of the $1-200. A couple from some of the really successful catteries were up around $500. People interested in the adults would go through the same interview processes as those interested in the kittens, and would sign the same contracts about keeping them inside, and giving the breeder right of first refusal. I think perhaps one reason the prices were a bit lower is that most of the cats were listed as being better suited to an only cat home. It does seem like that can make them harder to place.
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Izadore- (Izzie)

Always make it- look like the- dogs did it
 
 
Purred: Sat Mar 14, '09 7:00am PST 
That's how I got my dog, Ember. She was deliberately hit by a car while crossing a busy street in our downtown. A Good Samaritan rescued her and she wound up in our humane organization. The theory was that the college students at the downtown college got animals and when they left school, they just abandoned the animals. The cats grouped together and started colonies and the dogs roamed in packs. How sad. And how stupid.
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The- Magnificent- Seven

We all found- homes!
 
 
Purred: Sat Mar 14, '09 2:34pm PST 
In Japan, sometimes rescue organizations will only give animals to families, and not single people. The reasoning is that single people may then get married, move elsewhere, be unable to take care of the cat, and abandon it. That's why people turn to pet stores--no questions asked. And yes, some people are fussy about it being a one-cat only home. Currently I am trying to place my cats, and I must say that I get a great variety of inquiries--some from people who seem unstable, some from people who are so nice that they are beyond nice. I actually prefer people who already have a cat or cats, because they obviously understand and love cats. I don't mind single women, but the one single man who contacted me was creepy. That doesn't mean that I wouldn't give my cats to a single man, however. The cat world is filled with people who relate to cats better than people, and there are single men among them who I would be glad to give my cats to. Ah, homing cats is difficult.
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Miss Tiny- Burr Burr

Love and adore.
 
 
Purred: Sun Mar 15, '09 6:40am PST 
No, i know that re-homing show cats is fine. but people are re-homing them BEFORe they are fixed. This is a problem waiting to happen. someone might see it as a cheep purebred to make money off of. any responsible breeder will have any cat not up to the standard of breeding fixed. moreover, if they do not plan to breed them, and there show life is over, they should be fixed.

people are giving away "ex breeding" 'purebreds' that arnt fixed. here in michigan, siamses and ragdoll kittens are beind sold for 100 dollars and obvliously are just scams. people breed pointed longhair kittens and call them ragdolls
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Lola

Proud mother of- the Fab Four!
 
 
Purred: Sun Mar 15, '09 6:27pm PST 
In Japan, breeders sell their kittens in their intact state. But when you are registered with the CFA (and TICA is probably the same), you can specify whether the cat is allowed to be bred or not. Yes, irresponsible people will breed the cats anyway, but that's how it's done here. But cats that are bred without CFA permission cannot get pedigrees. Backyard breeders can get away with this (not all people demand pedigrees), but people in the cat world can't--which is one reason to seek a cat from a breeder who shows. Human psychology is strange--if you charge $300 more for a cat that has been spayed, people may or may not be less willing to buy it--but then will spend the same $300 to have the cat spayed themselves. On the other hand, once my own breeder upped his prices (no, he doesn't alter the cats he sells, but does charge for breeding rights), his cats sold FAST. Some people think that more expensive cats are better than cheap ones, and some people appreciate getting bargains. Also, as I've written before, I'd love to have a breeder buy one of my kittens, because then my cattery name would become part of that cattery's line. So, that's another reason for not selling desexed kittens. It's not a simple issue.

As for retired show cats/breeding cats--they are customarily desexed before being sold. One reason is that cats can only compete in shows for a fairly limited time; if you want to make Grand Champion--the intact class--the window of opportunity is about two years. For Premiers (the desexed class) the age limit is a bit longer, but cats seven years or older are considered "veterans." Breeding cats usually are retired at about age five.
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