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Ebay selling animals

This is a forum to discuss legislation and legal matters pertaining to the rights and welfare of cats. Please remember to counter ideas and opinions with which you don't agree with friendly and helpful advice and responses.

  
Alex (sweet- angel girl)

Angel on a- mission!
 
 
Purred: Mon Jan 31, '11 9:59am PST 
Ebay Classifieds: Stop Selling Live Animals
Ebay doesn't allow live animals to be put up for auction, but on their Classifieds site, animal sales are fair game.
http://www.change.org/petitions/ebay_classifieds_stop_selling _live_animals
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Lola

Proud mother of- the Fab Four!
 
 
Purred: Mon Jan 31, '11 10:08pm PST 
legitimate small-scale breeders also sell on the Internet. Some have websites. Some borrow space on a pet advertising site. That's how I sold my kittens. Yes, I met the new owners, we exchanged contracts, and it was perfectly legitimate. The Internet is the best advertising medium there is.

Edited by moderator Wed Feb 2, '11 12:31pm PST

Edited by forums moderator

Alex (sweet- angel girl)

Angel on a- mission!
 
 
Purred: Tue Feb 1, '11 10:08am PST 
I didn't know that, all I was reading was about phony breeders.

Edited by moderator Wed Feb 2, '11 12:32pm PST

Edited by forums moderator


AnnaBelle

Supervisor cat - is not amused.
 
 
Purred: Tue Feb 1, '11 11:08am PST 
Here is the correct link: http://www.change.org/petitions/ebay-classifieds-stop-selling-live-animals

Legitimate breeders should not use classified ads either. Or if they do, they should have a link to their own webpage. No sales of animals through any classified ad is a good sale.

I am currently working to convince a co-worker not to buy a yorkie off of craigslist. I know a good, licensed, real breeder who I used to work for and I am going to hook his family up with her to see about getting one. But buying any animal off of craigslist is very risky, same with the ebay classifieds.

Yes real small time breeders do exist who do things correctly. However there are correct methods of saleing animals and there are shady methods. Ebay is one of the latter.
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Lola

Proud mother of- the Fab Four!
 
 
Purred: Tue Feb 1, '11 7:03pm PST 
EBay is shady, and I wouldn't buy an animal off eBay. However, no offense meant, it is simply untrue that good breeders don't use the Internet. Japan has a very, very good name in the purebred cat world, and the breeders I know are active in cat shows, produce world-class champions, and, more important, take good care of their cats and love them to bits. They advertise over the Internet. Some have websites, some don't. A breeder is not necessarily sleazy if they don't have a website--one of the best breeders I know (in terms of the quality of the cats she produces and the passion she puts into her cat life--this woman lives for her cats) has no website because she's not computer-savvy. Or, rather, she doesn't need a website to sell her kittens--she sells them to friends, friends of friends, other breeders, people who have been introduced to her. My own breeder didn't have a website--he used an Internet advertising site that "introduces" breeders and potential clients. They meet, discuss the terms of sale, exchange contracts (a good breeder not only provides a contract, but expects a client to agree to certain terms--returning the cat to the breeder if the new owner can no longer take care of it, etc.), and of course, the client gets the chance to view the cattery, see all the cats (seeing Momcat and Dadcat and getting to view all the cats on the premises and the conditions under which they live). In the old days, such arrangements were made through Cat Fancy magazines. Now it's over the Internet. The Internet is THE medium for advertising/selling these days. Why should cat breeders not avail themselves of its convenience? If you are not familiar with the world of legitimate breeding, please do not make erroneous generalizations. Yes, selling by eBay sounds like a disaster. Selling by the Internet CAN be sleazy. But not necessarily so. Please familiarize yourself with the world of cat breeding--you will find it's not all bad. And you can start by looking at some breeders' sites. You'll find that some breeders have such stringent requirements for clients that many Catster people would not qualify.
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Lola

Proud mother of- the Fab Four!
 
 
Purred: Wed Feb 2, '11 1:07am PST 
By the way, DO breeders have licenses in the U.S.? We do in Japan, but I hadn't heard of it in the States. Interestingly, in Japan, you don't necessarily need a license to breed, but to sell. Thus, any kind of advertisement for animals, whether it be in a magazine, on the Internet, or through any other medium, requires that the advertiser possess a license--which is not easy to get. In the case of a breeder, a breeder's license is required. In the case of pet shop employees, they also need licenses (I'm talking about places where they sell pet supplies). Pet hotels, pet sitters, groomers, petting zoo managers, anyone who works with animals needs a license.

Yes, there are sleazy licensed breeders. There's one in my neighborhood, and it isn't me. But limiting advertising to licensed breeders (who receive periodic inspections from the local health department, and must renew their license every five years) does cut down on the dangers of buying from an advertisement or over the Internet.

Bad breeders are a problem. Bad customers are another. If you're going to buy an animal, first you must research (1) about the breed(s) you're interested in (sounds elementary, but if you know what the breed standard is, you'll know if a breeder is trying to sell you an inferior animal or, worse yet, a fake); (2) about animal diseases and what to ask the breeder regarding tests that have been done (HCM for Maine Coons), require health and vaccination certificates (yes, some customers neglect to do that); and (3) see the cattery (or kennel or whatever) IN PERSON. Anyone who is not a professional breeder with a network of professional breeder friends, who know all about the quality of other breeders, has no business buying an animal sight unseen from a breeder they don't know from a bar of soap. Caveat emptor. Buying an animal over the Internet without seeing it first, interacting with the breeder, or seeing the cattery is stupid, and yet people do it.

A customer who is stupid and irresponsible enough to buy an animal without doing the above three things is probably also the kind of person who will relinquish the animal to a shelter when it turns out not to be the kind of pet the owner wanted. Client irresponsibility breeds breeder irresponsibility. The medium used to advertise has nothing to do with the ethics of breeding, unless the breeder is trying to scam customers, and customers are stupid enough to be scammed.

EBay? Craigslist? No legitimate breeder would advertise there. But legitimate breeders DO advertise on the Internet, whether through their own website, or through classified ads. Every year, CFA Japan produces cats who have placed in the top three for that breed internationally, and yes, those breeders use the Internet. I know many of them personally, have visited their catteries, have bought their cats, and can say that their standards are as high as those of any breeder in the States. In fact, American breeders often do business with Japanese breeders. Of course, if you are of the opinion that all breeders, whatever their nationality, are sleazy, then that may mean nothing to you. But the Internet as an advertising tool is not evil. It's the people who use it (both buyers and sellers) who make Internet advertising either good or bad.
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wesley- alexis gold

i'm highly- reflective!
 
 
Purred: Wed Feb 2, '11 3:50pm PST 
May I point out the obvious? We're ON the internet RIGHT NOW. Catster is a virtual community. Ebay selling animals? Yeah, I see all kinds of issues there. But using the internet to complain about someone using the internet to advertise is just a little surreal...thinking
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Harvey

Has been COTD!
 
 
Purred: Wed Feb 2, '11 6:41pm PST 
By the way, I've been scammed on eBay. Not buying animals, no. I wouldn't even consider doing that. Jewelry. I was too stupid to figure out that I was being scammed and too stupid to realize that I had legal recourse. Use eBay and Craigslist with caution.
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Harvey

Has been COTD!
 
 
Purred: Wed Feb 2, '11 8:16pm PST 
By the way, have you noticed that the Adoption Forum (sponsored by Petfinder) advertises on Catster? And Catster is on the Internet? And that some people might choose a kitty by looking at the kitty's picture and going to meet the kitty in the picture? How is that different from looking at a breeder's advertisement and going to visit the cattery?

I'm confused as to why it's okay for shelters to advertise on the Internet, but not breeders. Is it because shelters are okay, but breeders are not? I can tell you that the cats I produce don't get sold with parasites, ear mites, URIs, and poor socialization, situations that can arise when adopting from a shelter.

Adopting a pet is a good thing. Having seen the cats listed on Petfinder, I can say that if I lived in the U.S. I would adopt from them. But I don't live in the U.S., and we don't have shelters here. We do have a rescue network, but ALL the cats I saw (and I looked at quite a few before buying Harvey) had physical or personality defects. One was blind in one eye from a Herpes infection. One looked like it had FIP. Another was crawling with fleas and had ringworm. Others hid under tables and refused to come out. One tried to bite me when I attempted to play with it.

Yes, I truly admire people who have it in their hearts to adopt special needs kitties or kitties who will never be lap cats. But I do not like feeling obligated to adopt one myself. If one of my present cats grew ill, of course I would continue to love it and give it the best of care. But why adopt a cat with needs you can't meet? Why has cat ownership become conflated with do-goodership? Why must one feel guilty about breeding or owning a purebred cat?
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♥- Roxy- ♥

Polydactyl Maine- Coons Rule!
 
 
Purred: Wed Feb 2, '11 10:31pm PST 
It's not exactly Ebay as in the auction site. The "Ebay classifieds" is actually the classifieds website Kijiji. Kijiji was always owned by Ebay, it's just that they recently decided to rename it and it is now being called "Ebay Classifieds."

Now I'm not saying that means it's ok/good that animals are being sold on there, but just that it's different from Ebay auctions. It's really just Kijiji rebranded.

Edited by author Wed Feb 2, '11 10:34pm PST

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