GO!

What's easier?

This is the place to share your best homemade cat food and treat recipes with each other! Remember to use caution if your pet has allergies and to make any diet changes gradually so that your cat's stomach can adjust to the new foods you are introducing.

  
Eddie

Bonjour.
 
 
Purred: Thu May 24, '07 8:43pm PST 
Is it better to buy or make?
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Merlin - An Angel- Forever

*Poof*
 
 
Purred: Fri May 25, '07 12:03pm PST 
Making homemade food can be time consuming and it is hard to make sure that the food has all the right nutrients in the right amount. Commercial foods are good and easy.
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Eddie

Bonjour.
 
 
Purred: Fri May 25, '07 3:36pm PST 
Makes sense...thinking
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Zap

516809
 
 
Purred: Sun May 27, '07 9:48am PST 
Most commercial pet foods are actually really bad for your pets. They have large amounts of grain and chemicals and are highly processed. We cook food for our cats, and it doesn't actually take that much time, since you can make a large amount of food at once.
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Abby Angel- at Rainbow- Bridge

Guardian- Angel
 
 
Purred: Sun May 27, '07 9:14pm PST 
Feeding commercial food is definitely easier. However, I think most commercial foods are not the best diet for cats. They are best as supplemental food or foods to feed in an emergency. Properly made & supplemented homemade diets, esp. raw, are IMO much much better than commercial foods.

However . . . most people don't or won't take the time to learn how to make the homemade food properly or they think they don't have the time to make it. The how-to's must be thoroughly researched and then followed to the letter. You can't feed your cats table scraps or unsupplemented meat and expect them to stay healthy.

So, I'd say that feeding commercial food is the best option for most people, esp. if it's a high-quality, ultra premium brand.
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Brownie- Cinnamon

It's Good To Be- A Feline!
 
 
Purred: Sun Nov 11, '07 9:17pm PST 
yes thats right Abby,
I do agree that most people won't learn what's best for their pets and how to make it what to add to it ............
idk ...... maybe I'll say buying the food is better BUT good food b/c of that same reason some people just don't get that cats are carnevores.If you do by any chance feed homemade food I have a group that has recipes links books and ways to understand home feeding pets It's called Making Pet Food.I feed my cats wellness and stray cats raw.
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Member Since
12/31/1969
 
 
Purred: Wed Nov 28, '07 10:07am PST 
Probably from seeing domestic cats out in a wild setting eating grasses and plants is how this whole, 'lets put grain in cat food', thing got started.


Right now I feed a little of everything / Raw/ canned EVO/ and homemade from feline future. - which is raw. Leopalor is thriving and Bindi is eating caned EVO. I can only hope where I will be going allows me to keep him on raw or even have his claws intact/ such stupidness in todays world frown Thankfully my parents will take him and his playmate Bindi if I have to end up in a group home that declaws cats.

I will be honest, Feeding Homemade is very expensive, (at lest in our area) I payed $50 for feline future powder and another $20 0r $30 for the meat to make it. If you have the $ do it though its very good for um. Right now I have ALOT of personal spending money from social sacurity plus work. at lest $300 a month. big grin
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Abby Angel- at Rainbow- Bridge

Guardian- Angel
 
 
Purred: Wed Nov 28, '07 12:34pm PST 
Making homemade food can be more expensive, especially in the beginning when you have to buy all of the supplements. The supplements should last for some time and I think it all balances out in the end. I think it's best to do lots of research on what to use as supplements with raw or homemade cooked, keeping your own cats' health and needs in mind, and buy them separately rather than a one-size-fits-all supplement.

My sister Mittens did not do well on the Feline Future powder supplement & raw. She ended up very sick from it although my other sister KC was fine. I've read pros and cons about the FF powder. It's supposed to be good as a *starter* supplement.
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Member Since
12/31/1969
 
 
Purred: Thu Nov 29, '07 8:17am PST 
I did not know that... thanks!shock Leopalorn has been doing great on it, He wized through a batch and I might make another.

Maybe its because a housecat isnt a wild animal, they might have the systems of there forbears but it might have changed,evolved sense then.
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Hattie

NaMeowSte
 
 
Purred: Sat Dec 1, '07 2:27pm PST 
I agree totally with Abby. When I first started eating raw, my human got my supplements at a people health food store, on the recommendation of my doctor. She was shocked by how much all of the supplements cost when she added it all up, but then she realized that if I didn't take to the raw, she could use the supplements herself, or give them to her dad who was already using a lot of them in his diet.

Bottom line, some of the stuff lasts a long time (we just finished a $20 jar of vitamin C powder that we bought three years ago!), so the initial investment is spread out over quite a while. My doctor said it wasn't really necessary to use the items specially formulated for cats, because they are often more expensive than mixing yourself. Also, there might be one ingredient in the pre-mixed powders that you react badly to, and you can't really isolate something like that unless you mix it yourself.

Edited by author Sat Dec 1, '07 2:30pm PST

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