GO!

How often do you wash your cats

Good grooming practices are essential for maintaining health and happiness for you and your cat. This is a forum to exchange tips and advice for proper care of your cat's hygiene needs.

  
(Page 1 of 8: Viewing entries 1 to 10)  
Page Links: 1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  
Gabriel

700192
 
 
Purred: Tue Jan 15, '08 2:19pm PST 
Hello there,
I was wondering if and how often your cat gets washed? A friend of mine says she never ever washes her Cat, because it is bad for there skin.. confused My husband as an allergy to cats . He is ok if the cat gets washed about every 4 -8 weeks. Gabriel does not really minde. I put him in the kitchen sink wash him with a mild shampoo and put some conditioner on.. After that I wash every thing out and blow-dry him. Should I not do that? Gabriel loves to come in our bed but if my husband get all itchy eyes that is not possible. So what should I do.. not let him in our bed or wash him????
[notify]

Armand

I'm a DIABETIC- momma's boy
 
 
Purred: Tue Jan 15, '08 4:02pm PST 
I have never ever in my life bathed any of my cats. They can usually groom themselves fine, especially if they are short haired. Most people I know don't bathe their cats either. Dogs however, are another story.

Consult with your vet on a bathing schedule. You may have to watch your kitty carefully to see if his skin gets overly dry from bathing....if you still want to bathe him.

Edited by author Tue Jan 15, '08 4:03pm PST

[notify]

Riddick

i like feeling- tall
 
 
Purred: Tue Jan 15, '08 4:02pm PST 
actually all cats can benefit from regular bathing because it helps remove dead hair and skin that accumulates as well as excess oils. it's a misconception that cat's clean themselves fine, especially long haired cats, and left in such a state is the reason a lot of older cats have horrible dull flakey coats. ost of this myth about bathing is simple because cats are a bit harder to train to stand grooming if it hasn't been done regularly since kittenhood, and most(not all of course) cat owners are either too afraid to do it or can't be bothered (much as some dog owners with outside dogs).

for what you posted you are doing a wonderful job by your kitty with regular bathing, especially since your husband has allergies. the only thing i would change would be to not use conditioner as it tends to gum up a cat's coat and adds to the build up of oil and dirt and at times even causing mats to form. as long as you stick with a nice cat shampoo and make sure you dry your baby completely afterwards you are doing great!
[notify]


Armand

I'm a DIABETIC- momma's boy
 
 
Purred: Tue Jan 15, '08 4:06pm PST 
Yes, but I don't feel like having stitches after bathing any of my cats. I would need kevlar mitts.....no joke. One of my cats fights tooth and nail when I even clip his nails, much less immerse him in water. There is no way I am bathing any of my cats....especially for no reason.

If there was a medical necessity, then I'd have to consult with a vet about options. And I have a long haired cat whom I brush regularly and that seems to be just fine for him. I'd rather have him shaved in the summer than bathe him if it was necessary.... Again, I'm not looking to lose an arm.

Edited by author Tue Jan 15, '08 4:11pm PST

[notify]

Riddick

i like feeling- tall
 
 
Purred: Tue Jan 15, '08 5:09pm PST 
ah but there in lies the problem. if started young a cat should be no different in the tub than a dog and has the same skin and coat requirements. i'm not saying to start hosing down 5 year old cats and up when you have no idea of back ground but starting form a young age is a must. just because wild cats don't get regular baths doesn't mean that domestic cats shouldn't in fact becuase they *are* domesticated they need it more. domestic animals come into contact with a wider variety of pollutants and such than wild and it really shouldn't be left there indeffinately. besides, what happens when a house cat gets into something that absolutely has to be washed off, not just wiped, and they have never been exposed to a bath? then you have an issue and possibly a serious one at that. i know i won't change anyone's mind about this as most cat people can't be bothered with the thought of proper bathing routines and skin care but i feel as a groomer, cat owner, and cat exhibitor i should try and help educate when possible.
[notify]

Starscream

King- Starscream
 
 
Purred: Wed Jan 16, '08 10:51am PST 
I have to agree with Riddick. It's always good to get your cat use to water than fearing it, in case of an emergency. I'm bathing my cat atleast once a month. Strangely enough he wasn't a kitten when I started! confused He seemed to tolerate water! Now I make it a habit to play "tub games" with my cat: I'll fill the tub with about an inch of water, bring out his string toy and play with him for about 10 minutes with him in the tub. It's becoming more of a natural thing for him to be standing in water. He'll even jump in the tub on his own when it's filled with water (1 inch water level).

I originally thought he had fleas since I itched ever since we brought him home from the pound. So I gave him a bath only to find out later it was the brand of litter that made me itch. laugh out loud

Our cat sleeps with us every night so he needs his regular baths. Besides, he smells less like "pound cat" and his fur has gotten much softer due to the regular baths. cheer
[notify]

Gabriel

700192
 
 
Purred: Wed Jan 16, '08 11:39am PST 
Hello there,

thanks for all the Info. I have always washed our Cats because of my husband and it seems to help with the allergies.
One more question if I can not put any condioner on, how can make sure it does not hurt him if I brush his wet coat. Gabriel is very , very , very sensitive and hates if I pull on his coat as I blow-dry him. shrug
yours Gabriel
[notify]

Riddick

i like feeling- tall
 
 
Purred: Wed Jan 16, '08 12:32pm PST 
with or with out conditioner you should just brush very lightly while the fur is wet, only about a quarter of the strength you would when dry brushing. you might consider purchasing a small high velocity drier rather than a regular hair drier as it will force the water out of the coat faster, though they sound like vaccums so acclimating the kitty to noise might take a few times.
[notify]

♠- KILLER- ♠

DIVA with a- heart of gold!
 
 
Purred: Wed Jan 16, '08 1:26pm PST 
i have allergies. all of my cats are taught early to deal with it. i bathe them monthly. it really does help. you can honestly just bathe them in clear water for allergies. a no tear ph-balanced shampoo is best.
[notify]

Margaux- Hemingway

It's all about- me, and always- was!
 
 
Purred: Wed Jan 16, '08 3:04pm PST 
I brush my short-haired cats frequently, but do not bathe them. In my experience with previous cats, bathing during kittenhood has no effect on tolerance of bathing as an adult. I think the playing games idea is a really good one though, and one I might try. Also, how do the cat wipes compare to a full-on bath? It seems like that might be a good option for a particularly vicious bather, or for a cat like I once had, who would do incredible gymnastics and really almost hurt himself during a bath.

I've never heard of bathing being harmful, and that no more often than 4 weeks is fine.
[notify]

  (Page 1 of 8: Viewing entries 1 to 10)  
Page Links: 1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8