GO!

Don't want to Alarm...re: Purina One Dry Food...but...

Discuss ways to improve the quality of your cat's life and longevity through proper nutrition; a place for all of your questions and answers about feeding your kitty!

Please keep discussions fun, friendly, and helpful at all times. Non-informative posts criticizing a particular brand or another poster's choice of food are not allowed in this Forum. References to any brand of food as "junk," "garbage," or other harsh names will be removed.

  
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Lenny

506958
 
 
Purred: Fri Dec 30, '11 6:10pm PST 
All is still good at our house...no pukes, hairballs, stinky poos (well, a couple...). Bebe is running around healthy. No word from my sister yet.

The cats are also eating less of the good food. They are not gorging themselves anymore. In the long run, it is going to be cheaper.

I am not feeding one specific food right now...I got tired of doing the blind taste test, and just mixed them all together. They seem to be really happy with it.
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Chloe

Miss Clean
 
 
Purred: Fri Dec 30, '11 8:43pm PST 
I came across this blog while doing some research, might be in connection to your cats diagnosis:

Guest post by Fern Crist, DVM

It is always the case that we vets deal with the same problems at home that we counsel our clients about. And not always terribly well. I’m certainly no exception. Years ago, I had a long-haired cat who threw up hairballs frequently, but unlike most hairball-barfing cats, she did not just hack up the offending wad and then go about her business as though nothing had happened. Nope, she would obviously feel ill for minutes to hours afterward. And probably beforehand, too, had I had the vision to see it.

I tried all the time-honored remedies that I prescribed every day for my patients. I dosed her with various brands of flavored petroleum jelly. I fed her diets purporting to help with hairballs by the inclusion of extra fiber. I brushed her constantly, which fortunately she loved. None of these things helped. Eventually I shaved her, leaving the adorable puffs on her legs and tail that made her look like a fat little old lady in tight leotard and legwarmers. As long as I did this three or four times a year, there were no more hairballs. Oddly enough, however, she continued to have vomiting episodes, albeit less frequently, and minus the hair. Diagnostics revealed inflammatory bowel disease, and eventually my poor sweet girl succumbed to intestinal lymphoma.

While rooming with a brilliant feline practitioner at a medical conference shortly after, still grieving, I confessed my frustration with the seemingly insignificant problem of hairballs. Her answer blew me away. There is no such thing as “just a hairball,” she says to me. Think about it. Cats developed stringent grooming behaviors in the course of evolution because grooming is a positive survival factor, probably through controlling parasitism and other diseases. So they are going to ingest a lot of hair. Does vomiting as a daily method for expelling this hair seem evolutionarily sound? Stomach acid hurts the esophagus and teeth, and frequent vomiting upsets the electrolyte balance. While vomiting as an emergency mechanism to rid oneself of the occasional nastiness seems reasonable, it seems unlikely that the daily vomiting of hairballs is the “normal” thing that the medical community has assumed it to be.

I’m hooked. Go on, I say. She continues.

Why would we think that “lubrication” of the gut with petroleum products would help? A cat is not a car. And in no way could a cat have naturally evolved to require the dosing with “lubricants” to survive or to thrive. Likewise, cats in the wild would never eat a “high-fiber” diet, and so would seem unlikely to benefit from one. On the contrary, it would appear logical that a cat would thrive better on what a cat has been evolved to eat – namely a mouse or a reasonable facsimile thereof – and that feeding a cat something wildly different from the diet it has evolved on is more likely to result in harm than in good.

No, she says, I think it likely that a “hairball,” far from normal, is probably a common early symptom of Inflammatory Bowel Disease. Impaired motility of the gut would account for the balling up of hair that should pass right through, if stomach-emptying time is the 0.2 – 2 hours it is reported to be in a normal cat. A cat shouldn’t be able to swallow enough hair fast enough to outrace normal stomach emptying time.

This is making sense to me. Particularly as I just lost my own cat to this. And as I think back, I realize that “hairballs” have been in the histories of a disproportionate number of the patients I’ve treated with IBD and lymphoma.

She tells me that she’s been changing her patients over to low-fiber diets (grain-free and low carbohydrate) for a while now, and she’s seeing a precipitous drop in the whole “hairball” thing. I can see the long-term implications of this line of reasoning: if cat food containing an unnaturally high level of fiber and carbohydrates is associated with an increased incidence of impaired GI motility and vomiting, and if cats fed this way are at higher risk to develop IBD and lymphoma, then a drop in hairball vomiting might mean that a cat has a lower risk of these two nasty diseases. Sounds as though a grain-free diet might be a better way to go.

This all made sense to me. No science to it back then, but neither was there any to support the idea that hairballs are normal. No one had at that time asked if a carbohydrate-based diet could possibly have long-term negative consequences for cats.

Well, they have now. Every day, there’s more scientific evidence that these “mere” hairballs we see so often may respond, not to grease and not to fiber, not to brushing and not to shaving, but to feeding a diet that looks like what a cat was evolved to eat.

In the intervening years, I’ve changed my own cats over to grain-free, low-carb canned foods, and I’ve seen nary a hairball from anyone for a very long time. In my esteemed colleague’s footsteps, I’ve been changing my patients over to these same diets. I hear about fewer hairballs, and my patients are slimmer, fitter, and healthier in many ways. Is this a panacea? Of course not. There’s no one cure for everything. But I now have serious trouble believing that a feline diet in which the calories are derived primarily from carbohydrates, which are much cheaper than proteins, is beneficial to anything other than the manufacturer’s bottom line.

So next time someone tells you that malt-flavored grease, fiber additives, brushing or shaving are the only ways to help with those annoying hairballs, think again. Hairballs may be more than just a stinky mess for you to clean up. They might well be a sign that your cat has a real health problem, and should see the veterinarian. And your cat might be telling you that her gut would be happier with “mouse” than with breakfast cereal.

http://consciouscat.net/2010/04/28/some-startling-new-tho ughts-on-cats-and-hairballs/
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Alex (sweet- angel girl)

Angel on a- mission!
 
 
Purred: Fri Dec 30, '11 9:52pm PST 
You've actually made the best point you could have about your kitties not gorging themselves. In fact I find that I may pay more for the better grain free foods but they eat less of that food because it's quality protein and it fills them up! And yes, it does save money in the long run. Carbs and junk just make you more hungry like a human eating cookies or potato chips. You just want more. Same thing! I'm so glad everyone is doing well now. It was a food lesson learned the hard way. This is what I try to teach with my website before kitties get sick. I'm just so sorry you had to go through all of that but thankfully you're babies are on the right track now. I'm so happy for you! way to go
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Lenny

506958
 
 
Purred: Mon Jan 2, '12 9:00pm PST 
Still doing very well. I do love that blog entry. It is absolutely true. I think I have gone all through my life thinking that our cats have normal bouts with barfing up hairballs...but now I do know better. I have had still NO barfing at all of food. They are not starving, but eating about 2/3 of what they did of the old food, and not gorging themselves. No diarhea, and no constipation...just normal.way to go They are still getting the concoction of a few foods mixed together, but are very happy. Bebe is thriving, and his long black coat is beautiful. cat on moon

No news yet regarding my sisters cat.
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Alex (sweet- angel girl)

Angel on a- mission!
 
 
Purred: Wed Jan 4, '12 10:18am PST 
That's fantastic! That's the best news we could have from you considering everything that happened. I'm so happy they're doing well. snoopy
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Member Since
01/04/2012
 
 
Purred: Wed Jan 4, '12 9:07pm PST 
I have been feeding my two cats Purina One Smartblend Indoor Hairball and Weight control for about a year (since Iams was pulled off of the shelves temporarily), and never had any issues. Since I bought this last bag, (at a Walmart in Ontario - expires Apr.2013), they have both been vomiting - sometimes it's runny, and sometimes they vomit right beside their bowl, immediately after eating. I know all cats vomit or have hairballs occasionally, but this has been a daily occurrence for nearly a week, which is definitely out of the ordinary. Changing foods is really hard on one of them, even if I do it gradually over a couple of weeks, but after reading other posts on a consumer site, I'm going to have to do another switch. I think Purina needs to test their recent products and pull it from the shelves - clearly something has gone wrong. I've written to Purina Canada with my concerns. My dilemma is whether to switch immediately and deal with the gastrointestinal issues from the switch(vomiting and diarrhea), or do it gradually and risk them getting more sick from the current food. Neither seems like a really good option!
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Lenny

506958
 
 
Purred: Fri Jan 13, '12 3:32pm PST 
Pull your food, and keep any leftover food and the bags that you have. My cats had no issues when I made the change.
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Bumpurr

RESPECT The- Star!
 
 
Purred: Fri Jan 13, '12 4:13pm PST 
Chloe, thank you so much, for sharing that blog! wavehug

When people post about a health issue, the first thing I ask is, what do you feed. In most cases, its a grain food. And I know from experience, if they switched to a grain free food or raw, their issues, in most cases, would go away.

Too many people don't know, the issues that can be caused, by feeding a food full of grains, by products and glutens. There was a time I didn't know either, until necessity, forced me to do extensive research. Feeding a grain free food, got rid of Prowler's crystals, got rid of Bump's tummy issues, which he was prob on his way to IBD too. Yes, it is more expensive, but in the long run, it eliminated alot of vet visits, and mine rarely throw up hair balls. Feeding Fancy Feast, to save money, cost me a $400 vet visit, so it didn't really save me any money at all.
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Lenny

506958
 
 
Purred: Sat Jan 14, '12 11:06am PST 
FYI my sister got the results from the Autopsy of the second kitty that died, via her vet:

Autopsy concluded that no pre-existing condition caused the illness, very suspicious results. More investigation is taking place.

That is all I know for now...will keep you posted as my sister finds out more.
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Member Since
12/18/2012
 
 
Purred: Tue Dec 18, '12 7:20am PST 
Hello about purina one I just bought a bag and it was the most expensive cat food in the shop as the cat hasn't been well . Took it home fed some to the cat, and today she has just vomited all of it back up. I know it's the food I just didn't realise there was an issue with it . I will take this matter further .
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