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Help me in picking the right cat!

If you are wondering what is the right cat for you, this is the place to be. In this introductory forum we talk about topics such as breed vs. mix, size, age, grooming, breeders, shelters, rescues as well as requirements for exercise, space and care. No question is too silly here. This particular forum is for getting and giving helpful, nice advice. It is definitely not a forum for criticizing someone else's opinion, knowledge or advice. This forum is all about purring and learning.

  
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Smokey *Rest- In Peace*

It's all about- ME!
 
 
Purred: Sun Feb 25, '07 7:40pm PST 
I want to bring a new kitty into my life! I want to have an indoor cat so the same thing doesn't happen! But I have 2 small dogs and a 2 year old! I need either a cat breed or an adoption known that would fit these circumstances! Thanks for your help in advance!kitty
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Emma

Adopt an adult- cat!
 
 
Purred: Mon Feb 26, '07 9:36am PST 
I would do a search on Petfinder. On Petfinder, they flag cats who aren't good for young children as well as cats who aren't good with dogs. You can run the search to eliminate those cats. Then read the profiles for the remaining cats. Often the description will mention if the cat is good with children and dogs.

I actually did a quick search on Petfinder for your area, and found at least one cat who fits your bill (his name is Scoot and he's at Pets and Pals--it says he came from a home with dogs and children). I just clicked on some random cats--I'm sure if you go through the listings you will find more. I would also call the nearby shelters and rescue groups and tell them what you are looking for, and ask if they have any cat they know fits the bill.

I also noticed a few cats in your area who need an adopter urgently. Maybe one of those would fit your needs. One thing I wouldn't do is look for a specific breed--different cats react around children and dogs differently depending on their experiences, so I don't think a specific breed will necessarily help.

Good luck!
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Maggie May

fix your feline!
 
 
Purred: Mon Feb 26, '07 6:58pm PST 
I wanted to take in a kitty that needed a home but I had to have one that would do well with my dogs. I went to a local shelter (Richmond SPCA) and all I had to do was tell them what I wanted and they gave me a bunch of well-suited cats to pick from.

I think the suggestion to pick a cat from a reputable shelter or petfinder.org is a wonderful one. Also, if you get an older cat (instead of a kitten) the shelter will be able to tell you more about his/her personality and quirks.
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Phoebe

I'm Fusky! (I'm- furry and I'm- husky!)
 
 
Purred: Mon Feb 26, '07 7:36pm PST 
Yes....also, a grown up cat is better able to protect himself/herself from the dog and the two year old!
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Maggie May

fix your feline!
 
 
Purred: Tue Feb 27, '07 6:51am PST 
Excellent point, Phoebe! Everyone loves kittens but most kittens have no fear and I think a little fear is healthy when you live with 2 big bumbling mutts like Maggie does. And I also wanted a kitty with claws intact in case my dogs got a little too curious about her. Just something to consider.

Plus, kittens are so cute and cuddly, everyone wants them. Older cats have a harder time of it and we all know there are wonderful cats that are just waiting for homes.

Anyway, good luck in whatever you decide and let us know how it's going!
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Phoebe

I'm Fusky! (I'm- furry and I'm- husky!)
 
 
Purred: Wed Feb 28, '07 10:45am PST 
Maggie May...even a 'teenager,' which would be between about 4 months and a year, is a good option. Big enough not to be squashed or damaged too easily, but young enough to adjust to new environments.
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Binks

Little boy in a- cat suit
 
 
Purred: Wed Feb 28, '07 11:55pm PST 
I would definitely go with a young adult cat. Since I have a small child, myself, that's advice from actual experience.
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Maggie May

fix your feline!
 
 
Purred: Thu Mar 1, '07 7:08am PST 
Maggie (according to the shelter) is 2 & 1/2 and she's adapted here quite quickly. Faster than I ever expected, honestly.

How goes the kitty hunt?
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Old Bear

Nothing's worth- getting excited- over.
 
 
Purred: Thu Mar 1, '07 7:41am PST 
My personal experience-older ex-tomcats are the most laidback and calm. They still know how to fight if need be, but if they've been fixed they don't go looking for it anymore. Mine have all handled visiting children very well but our son doesn't ever have anything to do with any animal in the house, so it's a pretty quiet house overall. Some of my neighbors also have ex-toms and we all have had the same experience. They're quiet, low-key, not very playful, already litter box trained, gotten through that curious always-getting-in-trouble stage, and can take care of themselves.
Drawbacks-
1)they may not get along well with other animals. My Old Bear never did until my other one came along-but she was a kitten. He tolerated her fairly well and they still get along two years later.
2)they will always be indoor/outdoor. They are survivors, but if you only want an indoor cat (I think I remember you saying that)an ex-tom may not be the best in that respect. IMO it would be cruel to keep a cat indoors completely when they've roamed all their lives and know freedom like that. Should you get a kitten that has only ever been an inside cat, that's different.
Only my opinions, but like someone else mentioned, older cats, especially beat-up looking ex toms like mine, are much harder to adopt than those cute cuddly balls of fur.
Just a few things you might want to consider. puppy
Let us know how it goes!
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Cecelia (Saint)

Forever Homes- Are The Best!!!!
 
 
Purred: Thu Mar 1, '07 1:08pm PST 
I think you should check out petfinder. I just found my forever home through my ad on petfinder and I'm so excited. cheer snoopy applause
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