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Feral cats, quirks and smirks.

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Little P (- short for- Little Pr

1261751
 
 
Purred: Sat Feb 15, '14 5:42am PST 
Catherine Helm posted on the Catster's The Cat's Meow newsletter about her feral named Zorro. He has not gotten to the stage where she can touch him yet and I would not recommend using a trap. It would only scare him more. You must be able to put him in a carrier. I would put a carrier out on the porch for a few days and let the cats get used to it and they would see it was no danger to them. Putting a lining of a towel or a t-shirt or straw/hay in the carrier helps. You already have a relationship with Zorro so hopefully soon he will trust you enough to let you touch him. I always found it easier at meal times to touch them. Just a little at first, then build up to a stroke on the head or back, no pressure. Talk to him all the time. It has paid off too well here, I now have 9 ferals and 4 kittens (their mama was pregnant when she came to us and she is already adopted out but they need homes!). I love them all and they stay pretty much on the property. I could not do what I do for them if not for 2 angels in Tulsa that have helped me with food and medical care.
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Tigger

Knead softly &- carry a big purr
 
 
Purred: Sun Feb 16, '14 1:33pm PST 
Please note that some places that neuter, at least around here, will not take a feral unless they are in a trap. I know when I trapped mine, the trap was covered with towels except for the opening, so it was not as scary & much safer. I am not saying you are incorrect, just for anyone to double check before they bring a cat in. Caring for ferals is not easy & sometimes people do not understand what we all do. Ferals are special too! cheer purrs from The Minions!
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Little P (- short for- Little Pr

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Purred: Fri Feb 21, '14 5:10am PST 
Tigger, I understand what you mean about ferals and traps, I have a wonderful vet who has a lot of experience with ferals and has a way with handling them. I have more or less tamed these cats. By that I mean that I have gotten them used to me, they run from others but not me. That is how I was able to get them into the carrier. I touch each of them everyday sort of the way cats greet each other. They generally touch noses and sniff each other. I am very familiar with all of them, some since they were kittens. They run and hide when the postman comes up or visitors (especially kids) come to the door but remain "family" with me. Some of the cats that I have had here were not ferals but were someone's pet at some point but now was on their own. I have a trap and try not to use it if at all possible but would not hesitate if it needed. I just have different ways with cats.
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