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Feeding Tube

This forum is for cat lovers seeking everyday advice and suggestions on health-related issues. Remember, however, that advice on a public forum simply can't be a substitute for proper medical attention. Only your vet can say assuredly what is best for your cat.

  
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Sushi

1274445
 
 
Purred: Sat Jun 22, '13 10:50am PST 
Hello,

So Sushi's getting a feeding tube put in through his nose to get food and meds into him. What I'm wondering is what kind of food would be "Thin" enough to go through the feeding tube? Vet recommended the prescription diet food however I'd much rather feed him something better for less. Also, what kinds of things can I add to help him out? I'm going to be adding some Acidophilus, Fish Oil, and his meds but is there any other liquid things that may help him to have more energy/appetite/build up his immune system?

Also, any tips or anything like that are more than welcome.

Thanks!

Edited by author Sat Jun 22, '13 10:51am PST

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Tigger

Knead softly &- carry a big purr
 
 
Purred: Sat Jun 22, '13 11:49am PST 
I do not have experience with this,but wanted to wish you & Sushi good thoughts. I know others on here have done this. way to go
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Sushi

1274445
 
 
Purred: Sat Jun 22, '13 1:30pm PST 
Thanks Tigger!

Update for anyone interested: He was fine getting the tube in, and tolerates it well. In fact the doctor was cracking up when he told my Mother about how apparently when they were putting the tube in he was purring really loud. laugh out loud
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Merlin - An Angel- Forever

*Poof*
 
 
Purred: Sat Jun 22, '13 4:30pm PST 
Put regular canned food into a blender with water and turn it into thin soup way to go Then just slowly put it into the feeding tube to prevent clogging. There might be some info here: http://catinfo.org/?link=feedingtubes
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Sushi

1274445
 
 
Purred: Sat Jun 22, '13 7:54pm PST 
Thanks Merlin! We've got some Authority on hand so I'll try some of that in the morning.

Update: He's home and doing ok, though he seems very drained. I'm hoping that's just because he spent the day at the vet and he'll be better tomorrow. Sadly the vet says there isn't a great chance he'll make it through but he's still happy, purring, and in no pain so there isn't a reason to stop trying. The vet commented that even when he was poking him with needles and inserting the tube he just sat there loudly purring.

Poor guy's got an iron deficiency so he's been licking the cement floor in the basement and eating his litter. cry Though we've been tube feeding him an iron supplement. The vet said to give half a dropper per day but the bottle says two half full droppers per day for puppies, kittens, cats, and dogs, so I've bumped him up to that.

The vet put him on 2 ml of food every two hours, but he seems to be fine getting 2 ml every hour so that's what I've been doing. He's also been eating and drinking a bit on his own which is good. He also still goes to the bathroom in his own little pan and walks and jumps up to get water.
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Sushi

1274445
 
 
Purred: Sun Jun 23, '13 10:12pm PST 
Update with a question: Sushi's doing a bit better! happy dance He's eating some on his own which is good. Though I laid out a bunch of choices of cat food wet, dry, and treats for him, what does he chose? The cheap as chips horrible quality Wegmans food. shrug Though it's a heck of alot better than nothing.

Here are a few questions I had... First, he seems to have an infestation of fleas, however I can't give him any flea meds in his current state. What could I do to get rid of the fleas? Any idea of any healthier dry food that would be really appealing? (He has to be on dry because he's getting so much liquid through the tube)
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Beep

Butt-kicker of- all other cats
 
 
Purred: Mon Jun 24, '13 4:04am PST 
He would not be very happy about it, but regular Dawn dish detergent is supposed to kill fleas. And a Capstar, which is a pill you would get from the vet, might be ok for him, you can even give it to pregnant females and kittens, it makes the fleas all fall off of them, then you just have to worry about treating the areas around him, where he sleeps, etc. The safest flea meds would definitely be Advantage, in my opinion, if you have to use something, definitely do not use one of those cheap hartz, sentry or biospot flea treatment stuff, that is very lethal stuff.

Poor kitty. I'm glad to hear he is eating a bit on his own and hope he improves.
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Merlin - An Angel- Forever

*Poof*
 
 
Purred: Mon Jun 24, '13 9:13am PST 
IMO you don't need any dry food. Any extra water that the body doesn't need will just be excreted in the form of urine. You might see more frequent litter box use from that. I wouldn't use dry food to try to "absorb" extra water in the body shrug

Did you ask the vet about flea treatments? Non-medicine treatments include frequent combing with a flea comb, a bath in Dawn soap, frequent vaccuming, washing blankets, towels, etc that the cat sleeps/lies on in hot water, using diatemaceous earth (not the stuff used for swimming pools. There's a food grade version).
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Sushi

1274445
 
 
Purred: Tue Jun 25, '13 9:26pm PST 
The vet is worried that too much water will cause him to not be able to absorb the nutrients in the food, or will cause his liver to have issues (I forget what it's called) Therefore I feed him dry food before tube feeding him to help soak up some of the moisture.

Another question, sorry! Is there a way I can make the tube food thinner without losing calories? Since it's a nose tube I have to add tons of water to make the food go through, however that means it's less calories per ml. The vet says I can only do 6 ml per two hours which isn't much so I want to find a way to make the food more liquidy without the water, any ideas? How about fermented goat's milk like the kind that Answers sells? Or would that not be good because of his compromised immune system?
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~Purrcy ~- Meohmy

I AM- MARSHMELLOW CAT!
 
 
Purred: Sat Jun 29, '13 7:52pm PST 
I had an E-tube for several months. My mumma would blend the food with water to make a slurry and push the food through the tube. Most cats with feeding tubes start with small doses of food several times a day and then the doses are increased and frequency reduced until the cat is eating on it's own. Mumma always put a few cc's of water thru my tube before and after each feeding to ensure the tube was patent. The same should be done before and after meds are given via tube.
Sometimes the tube blocks up - quick way to unblock is to push in a little bit of caffeine free cola. The carbonization frees up the tube.
High cal foods are meant to be mixed with water and are given so frequently that nutritional needs seem to be met. I gained several pounds whilst being tube fed and was not too unhappy with the process.
You need to be able to "play" a bit with this whole process - see what works and what does not. It becomes easier with time!
Mumma let me eat what I wanted (which was not much) and my vet didn't discourage dry food. she said let me eat what I would.
Hope this helps.
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