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Drinking more water than usual

This forum is for cat lovers seeking everyday advice and suggestions on health-related issues. Remember, however, that advice on a public forum simply can't be a substitute for proper medical attention. Only your vet can say assuredly what is best for your cat.

  
Isabelle

Do I smell- treats??
 
 
Purred: Sun Jun 26, '11 2:46pm PST 
I'm not sure if this is even an issue, but wanted to run it by you guys smile

Isabelle and I just moved to a new place where she has been living mainly in a large bedroom (for about 6 days now). She has access to a larger space, but has chosen not to come out yet (she's quite sensitive).

I noticed since about day 2 when she started to eat and drink again, that she's drinking more water than she used to. When I say "more" I mean she used to pee 2-3 times a day and now it's more like 4-5. And I notice her drinking often whereas in the other house I rarely saw her at the bowl.

Where I'm unsure if this is a medical thing or not is that she HAS been in a smaller area, so maybe she just sees the water more than she used to in her old house and decides to drink?? shrug Or is increased water intake usually always medical?

Thanks!!
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Merlin - An Angel- Forever

*Poof*
 
 
Purred: Sun Jun 26, '11 5:15pm PST 
Your profile says that you are 10 years old. It's not uncommon for senior cats to develop health issues that involce excessive water drinking. Diabetes is one condition. Is your cat eating a lot of food but always hungry? Flooding the litter box with sugary sticky pee? Losing weight? I suggest taking your cat to the vet to rule out any possible health condition. If all the bloodwork and stuff comes back normal, then no worries smile Always take a cat to the vet if he/she starts showing unusual behavior. Cats are very good at hiding illness.
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Emily

Don't pet, play!
 
 
Purred: Sun Jun 26, '11 5:16pm PST 
I wonder if she might like the taste of the water better in the new place. I noticed an increase in my cats water intake when I switched from tap water to the filtered water from the refrigerator that we humans drink. We think it tastes better...apparently they do too. Other ideas that come to mind....perhaps you notice it more because of where the bowl is in your new set up or perhaps she's just nervous and her routines are off. Hope it's not a health problem and that she settles into the new place soon. Good luck.
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Isabelle

Do I smell- treats??
 
 
Purred: Sun Jun 26, '11 9:25pm PST 
Merlin, how do I know if it's sweet sticky pee?? I haven't noticed a different smell and it clumps/scoops like normal. Is the smell pretty obvious? Also, she does act hungry a lot, but she kind of always does. Since her appetite picked back up, she's been eating quite heartily and definitely not losing weight.

Emily, I wondered about the different water, too. Although it's actually unfiltered here, which I'm not thrilled about, but I guess if she likes it?? shrug
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Rusty

let no food bowl- be empty
 
 
Purred: Sun Jun 26, '11 11:19pm PST 
Hi Isabelle;

I would get her checked by a vet ASAP. It could very well be diabetes. One of the major signs of diabetes is drinking more water. It can also be a symptom of kidney failure, and many other health issues. It is best if it is diabetes to catch it quickly. When was her last vet check up?
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Olivia

Adore me - OR ELSE!
 
 
Purred: Mon Jun 27, '11 12:48pm PST 
Isabelle, given your cat's age and the increased water consumption, I would probably take her in to be checked out. I think when it comes to stuff like this, it's better safe than sorry. And cats are SUCH creatures of habit that any time we notice a marked change in their routines, it's wise to pay heed to what might be causing those changes.

When was the last time Isabelle was at the vet's for a full workup? As a senior cat, she should be seeing the vet twice yearly instead of once per year, she should receive only vaccinations as required by law, and should have bloodwork and urinalysis done at least once (preferably twice) per year. If that has not been done in the last six months to a year, I would definitely take her in and have those tests run just to make sure all is well. The earlier you catch these things, the easier it is to treat them.
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Isabelle

Do I smell- treats??
 
 
Purred: Mon Jun 27, '11 4:50pm PST 
Oh gosh, she hasn't had blood work in like 2 years and urine not since before then. She goes in for regular check ups, but they never do blood work. I guess I assumed they would recommend it if she needed it, so never even thought to ask. shock Yes, she is 10 1/2 now, but if you ask her, she feels about 5. laugh out loud
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Merlin - An Angel- Forever

*Poof*
 
 
Purred: Mon Jun 27, '11 5:01pm PST 
The urine will have a sort of sweet smell to it instead of the usual strong smell. The clumps will be large and very sticky and hard to scoop.

Bloodwork should be done yearly for a senior cat. Ask the vet to do a full blood panel. Include a fructostamine which is the test for diabetes. It's also a good idea to do a cystocensis which is taking a sterile sample of urine directly from the bladder and testing it to check for bacteria or anything that shouldn't be there.
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