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FELINE PSYCHO-MOTOR EPILEPSY

This forum is for cat lovers seeking everyday advice and suggestions on health-related issues. Remember, however, that advice on a public forum simply can't be a substitute for proper medical attention. Only your vet can say assuredly what is best for your cat.

  
FOREST

PET ME PLEASE =)
 
 
Purred: Sun Oct 31, '10 10:27am PST 
I NEED SOME HELP UNDERSTANDING SOMETHING PLEASE.

I JOINED THIS SITE ABOUT THREE YEARS AGO LOOKING FOR HELP FOR ONE OF MY CATS WHO APEARED TO HAVE AGRESSION ISSUES.

I WHENT TO VETS AND SPOKE WITH BEHAVIOURIST AND DID TONS OF RESEARCH ON THE NET LOOKING FOR ANY KIND OF HELP. I TRIED REINTRODUCTION (MULTIPLE TIMES) IT TRIED BEHAVIOUR MODIFICATION, I TRIED DRUGS. THE ONLY THING THAT SEAMED TO HELP WAS APPLYING CESAR MILAN'S ADVICES ABOUT BEING CALM AND ASSERTIVE AT ALL TIMES.

I RECENTLY SWITCHED VETS AS I WAS CONCERENED THAT MY LAST VET WAS NOT UP ON THE LATEST INFO AND I FELT A WALET CRUNCH. I HAD MY FIRST APPOINTMENT ON SATURDAY THIS VET HAS BEEN ESTABLISHED IN MY AREA FOR OVER 130N YEARS AND HAS AN EXCELLENT REPUTATION.

I WHENT IN FOR AN ANNUAL FOR FOREST WHERE I BROUGHT UP MY CONCERN WITH HIS WEIGHT GAIN (PROBABLY DUE TO STRESS) AS WELL AS MY CONCERN WITH ARTHRITIS IN HIS PAW. THE VET SIMPLY SUGGESTED OMEGA THREE FISH OIL ADDED TO HIS FOOD (DID MAKE A NOISE AS TO WHAT I WAS FEEDING MY CATS) TO HELP WITH BOTH THESE ISSUES.

WHEN I EXPLAINED THAT THE STRESS WAS CAUSED BY AGGRESSION FROM MY OTHER CAT SHE IMMEDIATLY SUGGESTED FELIWAY (WHICH I'M NOT AGAINST I JUST CANT AFFORD)BUT I ALSO EXPRESSED HOW I FEEL THAT IT IS MORE THAN A BEHAVOUR ISSUE AND DESCRIBED JUST ON OTHER BIZZAR SIMPTOM(I HAVE DESCRIBED THIS TO OTHER VET AND BEHAVOURISTS) THAT IS HE WILL GO FROM A DEAD SLEEP AND LEAP UP AND ATTACH THE COUCH.

WITH JUST THAT DESCRIPTION SHE IMMEDIATLY ASKED ME IF HE HAD OTHER SYMPTOMS AND DESCRIBED HIM TO A TEE. THEN EXPAINED TO ME ABOUT THIS FELINE PSYCHO-MOTOR EPILEPSY. AS DESCRIBED BELOW.

"Feline hyperesthesia syndrome

This disease goes by a great number of names – as well as feline hyperesthesia syndrome, it may also be referred to as rolling skin disease, neurodermatitis, neuritis, feline psychomotor epilepsy and pruritic dermatitis of Siamese cats. Despite the last name, the condition has been reported in a number of different purebreds as well as domestic long and shorthaired cats. The condition usually first appears when cats are between 1 and 5 years of age, and occurs equally in both sexes. Attacks may occur more often in the evening and morning, but are not seasonal. In some cats the condition can be induced by petting or stroking them along the spine - hence the term hyperesthesia. The observed behaviors occur in all cats, but are taken to extremes in the cat with feline hyperesthesia. The skin over the lumbar region ripples, the cat looks at its tail, which may be held stiffly erect. The cat then starts to growl and attack its tail so aggressively that it may require amputation. (This is not curative, and the cat may proceed to attack the stump or tail head.) Cats may also attack the flanks or pelvis. They are often very restless and vocal. Attacks and pacing may be interspersed with periods of violent licking of the forelegs, base of the tail and chewing of the claws. Cats may rush around attacking objects and people indiscriminately. In contrast, cats that are normally aggressive may become unusually affectionate during bouts of hyperesthesia. Pupils are dilated and the eyes are glassy. Owners often describe their cats as being bewitched or hallucinating. A similarity to human schizophrenia has also been noted. Less commonly, definite prodromal signs may precede frank seizures, and some cats exhibit uncontrolled urination and defecation. Between attacks cats generally appear to be normal. Attacks can range in frequency from almost constant to relatively rare. Cats may become hyperthermic, probably as a result of increased muscular activity during and right after episodes, but there are no associated abnormalities on blood work. EEGs may show abnormal slow waves, dysrhythmias and spike discharges.

The cause of feline hyperesthesia syndrome is unclear. It has been treated successfully in some cases as a partial seizure disorder with phenobarbital (1-3mg/kg q 8h or 2-5mg/kg q12h) or primidone (0.5-3.0mg/kg q 8, q 12 or q 24h as needed). In other cats, this approach has had no effect. Some cases that had either failed to respond to phenobarbital or for which no other treatment had been attempted have been controlled using serotonin reuptake inhibitors (clomipramine 0.5 - 1 mg/kg q 24h or fluoxetine 0.5mg/kg q 24h).

The primary rule out for feline hyperesthesia is pansteatitis resulting from Vitamin E deficiency. This condition results in the deposition of a yellow pigment in fat cells that become inflamed and undergo necrosis. This process occurring in the subcutaneous fat layer causes skin hypersensitivity. Cats fed primarily canned red-meat tuna or small amounts of other types of fish may exhibit this syndrome.

Case: Oscar was a 4.5year old, 13lb, castrated male, domestic short hair, inside-outside cat. He had been spraying urine in the house for about a year. For a few months prior to presentation he had begun to attack the tip of his tail viciously and had bitten through to the bone. Skin rippling preceded tail chasing. Oscar held his tail stiff, twitching the end, he would then start to hiss at the tail before he launched his attack. Sometimes he would also attack his flanks and or he would chew hard on his claws. Sometimes he would attack the owner, particularly if she tried to stop his self-mutilation. Oscar was receiving 5mg of buspirone q 24h. This might have reduced his urine spraying a little. However, it is far less than the 10-20mg q 12h usually recommended for treating a cat of Oscar’s size. Buspirone was withdrawn and Oscar was started on a seventh of a 20mg capsule of fluoxetine q 24h. I felt that the new therapy would address both his spraying and feline hyperesthesia. Initially, Oscar’s spraying seemed to increase; this was attributed to withdrawal of the buspirone while fluoxetine levels were being established. Spraying then rapidly diminished and was eliminated when his dose of fluoxetine was increased to 5mg q 24h one month after treatment was initiated. Tail chasing became more playful and less vicious. The owner noticed that Oscar was more likely to engage in this behavior if it was too wet or snowy for him to go outside. Introducing a cat dancer toy also reduced aggressive attacks on the tail. After the dose of fluoxetine was increased, tail chasing virtually disappeared. When it did occur it was not preceded by skin rippling and seemed to represent grooming or playful behavior only. The cat never displayed aggression to his owner again after treatment had been initiated."

http://petshrink.com/articles/compulsive_cat.html

SO MY QUESTION IS WHY DID IT TAKE SO LONG TO GET THE DIAGNOSIS? WHY DID OTHER VETS NOT KNOW ABOUT THIS? WHY DID THE BEHAVOURIST NOT KNOW ABOUT THIS? WHY DID THEY NOT KNOW THE QUESTIONS TO ASK?

I'M JUST FRUSTREATED AND RELEIVED WITH THIS WHOLE SITUATION AND WOULD LIKE TO KNOW WHY IT HAS TAKEN SO LONG.
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Silver

Loners can be- loved too.
 
 
Purred: Mon Nov 1, '10 1:37pm PST 
Honestly, mom and I have never heard of this either. Maybe the other vet really just did not know about it. It can be very hard for them to focus on all issues until a case appears in their clients. Unless they are specialists that is. Mom knew of a feline only vet once but they are too far away for us to go see. If there were one near by she would go there for sure. I hope you find a way to cope with his illness. Good luck!
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FOREST

PET ME PLEASE =)
 
 
Purred: Tue Nov 2, '10 7:50am PST 
Hi Silver,

Thank you for your response.

Yes I will be brining Desert (the cat with feline psyco-mortor epilepsy) in to have an official visit with the vet in two weeks, I have spoken with her again and she had already spoke with a neurologist friend who told her about the latest treatment (gabapentin) how to administer it and the reasons it was not the medication of choice.

So I do have a plan of attack for this which is a great releif. I would like to point out that I had tried my local feline specialist and was NOT pleased with the service or treatment recieved as well she did not even indicate this condition as a possiblity.


I'm starting to more and more feel that it is genuinly hard to find a really good vet. But I do think experiance helps, as my new vet is older she has a greater experiance pool to pull from I'm thinking that is why she figured it out where the other ones did not. She may have prior experiance or because she has a friend that is a neurologist then through discussion she may have heard about it.

What ever the case may be We can now start to move forward and my enigmatic young man will hopefully be shortly freed from these (for him) terrifying experiances.
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♥- Tasha- ♥

Cat; I'm a kitty- cat!
 
 
Purred: Tue Nov 2, '10 8:18am PST 
I am thrilled you found a diagnosis for your baby!

I believe it is difficult to find a good vet. Second opinions and doing research yourself is a must when something is wrong. Always ask questions. Experience is great, but some vets think they already know everything and refuse to consider anything new~ it can be very frustrating! It sounds like you found a great vet!
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Member Since
10/26/2013
 
 
Purred: Sat Oct 26, '13 9:08pm PST 
I want to respond to your post on FHS which my little 6 mo. Old siamese suffers from also. I won't go in to the horror she went through or my insisting on med for her after doing my open research. I will just say her life is so much better now with1 ml of gabapenten 2x a day. she weighs about 4 and 1/2 lbs. She no longer attacks herself and is doing great with only minor twitches .. She had her tail amputated but due to her meds she no longer attacks it and at least it is a fluffy bob! I hope this helps other kitties and stressed out owners! She had to wear a cone Twenty four seven and I could not relax for fear she would have to be put down if she bit thru the stump of her tail again. she's a great little but I'm dreading having her spayed bc of anxiety.
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