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Falling over when vomiting

This forum is for cat lovers seeking everyday advice and suggestions on health-related issues. Remember, however, that advice on a public forum simply can't be a substitute for proper medical attention. Only your vet can say assuredly what is best for your cat.

  
Sophie

139008
 
 
Purred: Mon Mar 24, '08 7:21am PST 
Sophie occasionally vomits, but sometimes when she goes to vomit and heave she starts staggering and literally will just fall on her side. Has anyone experienced this with thier kitty? It's very disturbing to watch and I try to hold her while she does this. She doesn't always vomit that way but yesterday she did it twice. She's fine aftwards. It just looks so scary, like she has a head injury or something and isn't even able to stand. shrug
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Pepper

Please Save a- Life, Adopt a- Cat!
 
 
Purred: Mon Mar 24, '08 7:49am PST 
I would consult a vet immediately, call them and describe her symptoms. It may be a serious condition... and any time a cat regularly vomits you need to be concerned about weight loss and other problems... It is worth a phone call, and probably a vet visit.
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Dulci (In- Loving- Memory - you

Kitty's final- rest in a grove- of trees
 
 
Purred: Mon Mar 24, '08 7:59am PST 
I don't know if you know this definition or not, so if this is "common sense" to you, then sorry. smile

When a cat "upchucks' there are two distinct types. The first is "regurgitation" which happens from the throat. Usually, this is from eating too fast, or from hairballs. it is a normal healthy way for predators to get rid of "bad" prey. It's safe and you generally do not need to contact a vet, though you may want to try over the counter things like hair ball remedies, or something to slow the cat down when it eats.

Regurgitation is basically gentle, the product is usually tubular and solid, and you can see the chunks of un-chewed food. the cat will easily puke then move on, or it might even eat what it just threw up.

VOMIT, however, is from teh stomach. Just like in humans, it is violent, the cat shakes, and exerts serious pressure, may cry out, and will often hide when she is done. The product is usually wet, even just liquid, smells like bile rather than just food.

Vomiting is virtually always serious. If this is what your cat is doing, you should call your vet. But adding the fact that she is extremely weakened by the vomiting, i'd take her straight in.
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Sophie

139008
 
 
Purred: Mon Mar 24, '08 9:00am PST 
Thank you for your replies. She has been vomiting from the stomach then because it's a yellowish color and it's liquid and it's only a teaspoon full. Sometimes my cats throw up undigested food and I think it's because they woof their food down to fast. I will contact the vet and see what's going on. She doesn't throw up a lot at a time and it's not an everday thing either. She acts normally, even playing and has an appetite so it's strange. Her brother was doing this last year so bad and was losing weight. I took him and they ran all of these tests. Turns out it was food allergies. I have them on a holistic cat food maybe I need to switch it up again.
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Sophie

139008
 
 
Purred: Mon Mar 24, '08 9:03am PST 
My cats are on Natural Balance right now. I want to try something else...any suggestions? One that has an allergy formula?
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Pepper

Please Save a- Life, Adopt a- Cat!
 
 
Purred: Mon Mar 24, '08 9:26am PST 
I always recommend Orijen just because I am so pleased with it... Pepper has some food sensitivities... especially to beef.

Don't look for "allergy" formulas per say... Often this is just marketing thing, especially for the grocery store type brands. Find a high quality pet feed store and ask if they have samples available... That is how we picked Orijen, Pepper gobbled it, no beef, and no food coming back up. If there are allergies it can be trial and error.

I would still contact the vet ASAP.
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Hunter

Lazy, Lazy, Lazy
 
 
Purred: Mon Mar 24, '08 1:41pm PST 
It is not normal for cat to vomit and certainly not normal behavior to collapse while doing so. you should definitely contact your vet and have them do a full physical including blood tests to rule out any potential problems. If it is an allergy to food...may be but check with vet first...then trying a food with only one protein and one carb source (preferably something they have never eaten before) for a minimum of 8 weeks may prove beneficial. You must adhere to a strict diet of the food and NOTHING else. If the vomiting continues it is likely not a food allergy.

To help cats that eat too quickly, place their food on a cookie sheet or a plate. Even placing a small ball (ping pong sized) in their dish will help them slow down their eating. this forces them to pick up one piece of food at a time rather than a whole mouthful.
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