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Any comments on DeClawing

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Coco

King of the- house
 
 
Purred: Wed Dec 6, '06 6:04pm PST 
Declawing is a horrible thing. My mom taught me to use a scratching post when I was very young and I am very good about using it. By the time my mom brought my sister home she got lazy and wasn't quite as strict with her, therefore my sister has ruined the couch. It's not Bailey's fault that her instincts tell her to scratch and mom knew that when she adopted us. Our good health and well being are far more important than some stupid furniture ,and mom wouldn't even think of doing something as cruel as declawing us. Our mom sees it this way...she would never cut the fingers off (in essence, that's what declawing does) of a human child because he or she ruined the furniture. We are her furry children. Mom is looking at new couches this week and has resigned herself to having to buy a new couch every couple of years. Expensive, yes, but the love we give and the joy we bring is worth every penny!
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Fluffy

Someone needs a- hug!
 
 
Purred: Wed Dec 6, '06 8:06pm PST 
Just a question for those who think they can't have a cat without declawing it...suppose it was illegal in this country? Would you go to some "underground" vet (assuming those exist) and have it done illegally anyway? Would you opt not to get a cat? Would you make the effort to try alternatives? Just curious.
For the one who said the soft paws came off one or two at a time over a couple of weeks--that is not abnormal. They are NOT meant to be a one-time permanent thing, and you do have to replace them as they come off. They should last longer than a couple of weeks, but I've occasionally had to replace them more often than the "instructions" say. I didn't find that a problem--it took a whole minute or so to slap another one or two on.
If you're willing to make it work, you can in the vast majority of cases.

Fluffy's mom
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Fluffy

Someone needs a- hug!
 
 
Purred: Wed Dec 6, '06 8:16pm PST 
"Would I ever say that no one should care for a cat who is not able or willing to take it to get spayed/neutered or pay for regular vet care if something is wrong? No. "


I would. If you know you can't afford to have your cat fixed and can't afford vet care, you have no business owning a cat. Same goes for dogs, or any pets.
I've seen pets die or be euthanized because they were taken in by people who were not financially prepared for the responsibility of a pet. We have saved a few by having staff members adopt them, but we can't take them all on.
I sympathize with anyone who has unexpected hard times (despite trying to plan ahead) and needs help with a pet's medical emergency, but if you know ahead of time you can't pay for that spay, or that broken leg or chronic health problem, wait to get a pet until you CAN afford it.

My story and I'm sticking to it,
Fluff's mom
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Graymalkin

I come,- Graymalkin
 
 
Purred: Sun Dec 31, '06 1:18pm PST 
Graymalkin was fairly young when he was declawed. My parents tolerated his carpet shredding but when I moved my partner was not pleased. We decided to look into soft paws and declawing. We decided on the latter. Graymalkin had the operation on his two front paws and recovered nicely with lots of care and love. He is an indoor cat so there is no worry about him not being able to defend himself outside. He is well adjusted and has a sweet temperment. Things are much smoother in my household. I am glad I went through with the process
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Member Since
01/26/2010
 
 
Purred: Fri Nov 9, '12 9:08pm PST 
DON'T DO IT! It totally takes all their defense away. Its mean and the cat won't like you or the crazy vet (I think any vet that performs this cruel operation, should lose their license) that does this to them. I was given a de-clawed cat about 1 year ago. The person that gave him to me, had him outside/inside. She said the person that gave him to her had de-clawed him. I could not comprehend the stupidity of having a cat de-clawed and then giving him away to someone that was going to keep him outside. He is a wonderful addition to our family. He can not climb up the cat trees we have inside. So, he just lies on the sofa or anywhere he wants that is low enough for him to get in or on. DON'T DO IT! Get furniture covers if you are worried about your furniture.
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Pequena- (Sasha's- sister)

1210304
 
 
Purred: Mon Nov 26, '12 2:15pm PST 
Soft Paws are TERRIBLE!!!! I tried several times to get them on my cat. Lets just say to be able to properly get them on all her paws and keep them on there so the glue can dry I would have to tranquilize her!

Everytime I tried I was only successful at getting them on about 6 or 7 claws. And half of those ones I did get off would come off within a day or two, if not hours. And once the soft paw was so successful, that it would NOT come off! After two weeks of it being on I kept trying to get this one off (the only one still remaining on) I tried and tried for two weeks to get it off to no success. The claw grew too long and it was starting to dig into my cat's padding on her paw, so I had to take her to a groomer to get it off.

SoftPaws are awful, anyone who can successfully get them on all the claws and get them to stay on longer than a day is a miracle worker.

I gave up on that. I have double sided tape on parts of my couch, but I cant tape up my entire couch because then I couldnt use it. So my cat still scratches some parts of the couch.

My cat Pequena I have no declawed and I just live with her scratching up my stuff sometimes, and she is good about keeping her claws in when I am holding her and such so she never scratches me hardly at all.

But my cat Sasha I had to get declawed. All my efforts failed and I tried everything. And she never put her claws in, she would keep them out all the time so not only was she scratching up my couch and such but she was destroying my clothes and I had scratches all over me. I did the laser declaw which only removes the nail and the nail bed. It is much safer and more humane and she never had any behavorial problems from not having her claws, never had any problems jumping up on anything and she didnt seem to miss them at all. She still would "scratch" on my couch but that was her way of telling me that she wanted me to play with her.

I wish I didnt have to get her declawed and that some of the alternatives had worked but they didnt so I dont regret declawing her with the laser method and I gave her a very loving life.
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Kyubey

PLAY!!! Play- play play play- pl...zzzzzzz
 
 
Purred: Mon Nov 26, '12 6:05pm PST 
When I worked as a vet tech, I assisted in one declaw, on a cat who had a congenital disorder which made his skin extremely fragile. He would tear himself open and need stitches just from normal kitty scratching. His people made the sad decision to declaw his rear feet, since he was coming in for stitches almost every week, and his fragile skin healed slowly.

I can't think of any other situation in which I would have been OK assisting with the procedure, and indeed the vet I worked for had never done a declaw procedure and never intended to, until we came across this special needs boy.
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Amber

Georgian Blue
 
 
Purred: Sat Dec 1, '12 8:32am PST 
I would not do it to my cats, but it is your decision. A lot of people declaw their cats. Just remember that cats need special care after being declawed. Only have a licensed vet do the surgery. You will bring your cat home the next day. Give him/her a quite place to recover. Check the paws twice a day for signs of swelling. Make sure your cat continues to eat. Don't allow him to jump up on furniture while he is healing. Watch for excessive licking of the paws. Don't wash the paws while they are healing, either. It will be weeks before your cat will be able to walk normally again. Your cat will need a lot of tender loving care after the surgery. Remember not to pick at the stitches. Also, you can't use clay cat litter for at least a week following a declawing. Never, ever give a cat pain medication meant for humans.
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Paula

Guinea Pigs are- Food - Not Pets
 
 
Purred: Sat Dec 1, '12 11:27am PST 
America is probably the only place that would allow somebody to declaw their cat. Do you really want your cat to suffer pain? A cat was designed with claws for a reason! Once declawed, a cat's personality will often change. There are nail caps called soft paws, which are a more humane solution. Only use these on indoor cats, as outdoor cats need their claws for protection. In English, France, Wales, Scotland, Italy, France, Germany, Bosnia, and many other countries, declawing is illegal. Declawing is nothing short of mutilation. There is no reversing it. It can also cause the tendons in the feet to contract. Cats that are declawed have extremely poor balance. Claws are a normal part of a cat's body. A declawed cat is going to be very insecure. They may not even want to use the litterbox because of the pain in their poor paws!
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Amber

Georgian Blue
 
 
Purred: Sat Dec 1, '12 12:53pm PST 
I think it is best to try Softpaws before deciding to declaw your cat. I wish people would educate themselves before declawing their cat. Most people who decide on declawing are very young. In my honest opinion, people who support declawing are seriously delusional. I've had cats all my life and would never declaw any of them. It's very sad when someone puts their furniture above the life and health of their cat. Declawing is actually a form of amputation. Declawing is only common in North America, Kora and China (cats are also eaten in these countries). The only time I think claws should be removed is if there is a serious medical reason, like chronic inflammation. Over 30% of cats that are declawed will experience serious discomfort. 50% of cats will have post-surgical complications.

I provided information earlier on how to care for a cat that had been declawed, if someone chooses to do so. However, I don't believe it is right. However, you still have the right to in this country and it is ultimately your choice.
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