Gideon


Snowshoe
Picture of Gideon, a male Snowshoe

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Home:Western, IL  [I have a diary!]  
Age: 19 Years   Sex: Male   Weight: 12 lbs.

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   Leave a treat for Gideon

Nicknames:
Gibson for those baby blues just like Mel Gibson, Bing, and "Giddy-Kitty" sadly enough:)

Kitty Complexion:
 Activeness 
sleepyvery active
 
 Intelligence 
sillygenius
 
 Curiosity 
not curiousvery curious
 
 Friendliness 
timidaffectionate
 
 Vocal 
not vocalvery vocal
 

Quick Bio:
-purebred-pound cat-cat rescue

Birthday:
March 13th 1995

Coloration:
Seal Point

Likes:
Playing, Games, and fun, fun, fun!

Pet-Peeves:
Too-short play sessions and the day the Christmas tree gets packed away:(

Favorite Toy:
Pretty much anything of interest, but particularly the "homemade" toys like foil balls, milk rings, q-tips, and socks.

Favorite Nap Spot:
Wherever he happens to be when he near-limitless energy goes kaput.

Favorite Food:
Catnip cookies.

Skills:
He can leap six feet in the air from a dead stop, bounce off the wall and race to the other side of the dining room in less than 15 seconds.

Dwells:
indoors

Arrival Story:
Gideon was picked up as a stray in West Virginia. Through rescue connections, we took him in planning to find him a good home once he was vetted-- and we thought we had, twice. Gideon has gone home with "wonderful" families twice already and been brought back by nasty complainers . . . it seems he just doesn't want to live with them!

Bio:
Gideon is a sweet affectionate charmer, but if he even thinks someone might be thinking of adopting him, he disappears. More than once he has made his preference known, and he chose us! When placed in another home Gideon has been known to bite, not use his litter box, play sick, randomly attack, and keep the house awake calling for . . . (perhaps me?). But here with me, he's an angel. Except for the occasional broken object due to his obsessively playful nature, Gideon is wonderful, and we're happy to have him!

Lives Remaining:
5 of 9

Forums Motto:
Don't pick me! I like it here!

I've Been On Catster Since:
February 20th 2006 More than 8 years!

Rosette, Star and Special Gift History

Catster Id:
267626


Meet my family
OpheliaLibertyWalterOne-Eyed Jack
SophieOliverMasatoCarlie
PennyIvanMaggie JuneDaphne

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Living with the God of Cats


The Truth About FIV+ Cats

February 21st 2006 8:50 pm
[ Leave A Comment ]

FIV is a cat-only disease. This immunodeficiency virus (like all immunodeficiency viruses) is very species specific - so specific, in fact, that the virus domestic cats have is different from the kind the big cats have.
You cannot catch FIV from your pet.

FIV is spread between cats by bite wounds and blood transfusions, and sometimes mating. Unless and FIV+ cat bites another cat, the virus cannot spread. FIV can never be spread casually. Casual meaning sharing litter boxes, water and food bowls or snuggling and playing. It is even unlikely for an FIV+ mother to give FIV to her kittens. Unless your cats get into a SERIOUS cat fight, or mate with one another, they cannot spread FIV - no exception, no way.

With the truth about FIV in hand, there is no reason that more people cannot adopt FIV+ cats, who most often vanquish in shelters due to poor education. FIV cats can live quite long and quite normal lives. Cats seem to live a long time with this virus often with no symptoms at all. Our eight FIV+ cats (two of whom are now FIV-) are completely asymptomatic, healthy, happy and in great condition.

Of course, there is no guarantee that an FIV cat will not develop clinical disease; but there's no guarantee that any cat won't get sick from something sooner or later! And in our research and experience, our FIV+ cats are no more likely to get ill than anyone else. The only difference? If an FIV+ cat comes down with an upper-respiratory-infection, we make sure they get strong antibiotics right away. A compromised immune system can make recovering from simple illnesses a longer process, but FIV+ cats can and will recover!

Something else not a lot of people know about FIV is that it is not necessarily permanent! Three cats we have owned/cared for shed the FIV virus at some point. All it takes is good vet care, great food, and an indoor-only home. Just like some people battle cancer without medications or chemo-therapy your cat can battle FIV with proper care!

Meanwhile, it seems to me that the life span of FIV+ cats, even one who was never able to shed the virus, is quite long and that they have a lot to give us. FIV should not be a sentence or a stigma that prevents a delightful feline from coming into your home. It's time to end the fear and misinformation about this virus and to spread the truth about FIV so that these healthy cats can find the homes and the love they deserve.

 
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